Stove Pipe Corrosion

Re: Stove Pipe Corrosion

PostBy: gerry_g On: Sun Oct 07, 2012 2:09 am

I've looked into black pipe replacements but found two problems.

I can't find a galvanized or SS barometric damper and the expensive adapter from my SS chimney to standard stove pipe only comes in steel, not galvanized or SS.

This summer I ran a humidifier in the family room and a very small "personal" desk fan to constantly force a little of dehumidified air through the system. I placed the fan to blow into the combustion blower.

Worked pretty well this past summer.

gerry
gerry_g
 
Coal Size/Type: rice
Other Heating: Electric, Propane
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Pioneer LE Top Vent

Re: Stove Pipe Corrosion

PostBy: jeff216410 On: Wed Nov 07, 2012 4:21 pm

The stainless pipe rusting issues seem to be a poor grade or mislabeled stainless. Any seam welds of pipe coule be an issue as well (weldors don't often use the right welding rod on stainless pipe). I've got 304 pipe and there no single mark of rust staining anywhere inside or out. If I wipe the inside of the pipe with a rag it is shiny new. I think it's time to find a new stainless vendor.
jeff216410
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Liesure Line Hearth

Re: Stove Pipe Corrosion

PostBy: Berlin On: Wed Nov 07, 2012 8:22 pm

jeff216410 wrote:The stainless pipe rusting issues seem to be a poor grade or mislabeled stainless. Any seam welds of pipe coule be an issue as well (weldors don't often use the right welding rod on stainless pipe). I've got 304 pipe and there no single mark of rust staining anywhere inside or out. If I wipe the inside of the pipe with a rag it is shiny new. I think it's time to find a new stainless vendor.


Jeff, time, moisture, and coal differences change luck with stainless dramatically. Stainless, be it 304 or 316 won't last long with coal and moisture doesn't help, if your pipe isn't pinholed yet, wait a few years, perhaps a few more if you're in a dry location.

There are four things that lead to rapid deterioration of stainless. Iron pitting corrosion from iron particles in coal flyash leading to a compromised passivation layer, low oxygen levels in coal exhaust leading to an inability to replenish the passivation layer, chlorine (HCL and other chemicals) attack, and acid attack from the sulfur in the coal. These four things combine to form a very aggressive corrosion against stainless steel. Yes, moisture does need to be present to allow stainless to deteriorate, however, the moisture in the air is often enough to initiate the corrosion and once it starts it's only a matter of time.
Berlin
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Will-Burt Combustioneer 77B
Coal Size/Type: Ohio BITUMINOUS pea stoker coal

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