Initial firing of new stove - Coal or Wood?

Initial firing of new stove - Coal or Wood?

PostBy: LDPosse On: Mon Sep 24, 2012 10:22 pm

I am planning to finish hooking up my new DS1500 Circulator this weekend.

I want to fire the stove a couple of times to cure the paint, while it's still warm enough to keep the window-stats open. I was thinking of just burning a few wood fires in the stove for the curing process. I feel like starting, then stopping the stove with coal is just wasting good coal. Anyone else have thoughts on this? Will the DS stove burn wood effectively enough to cure the paint?

Thanks!
LDPosse
 
Stove/Furnace Make: DS Machine, Warm Morning
Stove/Furnace Model: DS1500, WM 400-A, 523

Re: Initial firing of new stove - Coal or Wood?

PostBy: nortcan On: Mon Sep 24, 2012 11:50 pm

One thing about what you said is that: burning wood at the beginning and at the end of the season coat the parts of the stove, stove pipe, chimney with soot.
That coat is more alkaline( less acidic) than coal deposits so it could probably be a good thing to do as a ""free" protection :?:
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Initial firing of new stove - Coal or Wood?

PostBy: oppirs On: Mon Sep 24, 2012 11:52 pm

I want to use coal... but first time may be wood as I have 7 cords.

Still not to cold to fire a stove yet.
Last edited by oppirs on Tue Sep 25, 2012 12:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
oppirs
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Russo / Lopi
Stove/Furnace Model: CW #2 / Liberty

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Re: Initial firing of new stove - Coal or Wood?

PostBy: nortcan On: Tue Sep 25, 2012 12:04 am

oppirs wrote:I want to use coal... but first time may be wood as I have 7 cords


You will certainly get a real nice soot protective coat inside the equipment :D
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Initial firing of new stove - Coal or Wood?

PostBy: oppirs On: Tue Sep 25, 2012 12:08 am

nortcan wrote:
oppirs wrote:I want to use coal... but first time may be wood as I have 7 cords


You will certainly get a real nice soot protective coat inside the equipment :D


What are you saying... I like creosote?
oppirs
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Russo / Lopi
Stove/Furnace Model: CW #2 / Liberty

Re: Initial firing of new stove - Coal or Wood?

PostBy: oppirs On: Tue Sep 25, 2012 12:17 am

I have brushes to remove it.
Last edited by oppirs on Tue Sep 25, 2012 8:59 am, edited 1 time in total.
oppirs
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Russo / Lopi
Stove/Furnace Model: CW #2 / Liberty

Re: Initial firing of new stove - Coal or Wood?

PostBy: nortcan On: Tue Sep 25, 2012 12:18 am

oppirs wrote:
nortcan wrote:
oppirs wrote:I want to use coal... but first time may be wood as I have 7 cords


You will certainly get a real nice soot protective coat inside the equipment :D


What are you saying... I like creosote?


Well if you burn all that wood, you will have no acidic deposit but maybe creosote if the stove is not a good gasses burner :?:
I thought you were going to burn just a few wood then switch to anthracite?
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Initial firing of new stove - Coal or Wood?

PostBy: Body Hammer On: Tue Sep 25, 2012 7:53 am

Yes, thats what I would do Posse. It would be wasting coal, and a lot of mess just to get the stove hot. To get the same results with coal; you would have to have at least half a load, and that would give you a long burning fire. So I would go with a couple of wood fires. But bring it up to temp slowly.
LDPosse wrote:I am planning to finish hooking up my new DS1500 Circulator this weekend.

I want to fire the stove a couple of times to cure the paint, while it's still warm enough to keep the window-stats open. I was thinking of just burning a few wood fires in the stove for the curing process. I feel like starting, then stopping the stove with coal is just wasting good coal. Anyone else have thoughts on this? Will the DS stove burn wood effectively enough to cure the paint?

Thanks!
Body Hammer
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman TLC 2000

Re: Initial firing of new stove - Coal or Wood?

PostBy: oppirs On: Tue Sep 25, 2012 8:52 am

Well if you burn all that wood, you will have no acidic deposit but maybe creosote if the stove is not a good gasses burner :?:
I thought you were going to burn just a few wood then switch to anthracite?


OK got admit I like to cut & split wood! We have shaggy Hickory too + others in the Walnut family, great for the smoker. One thing I miss is the oily smell of coal. I don't know if anthracite would do the trick. I'm not getting rid of my Lopi Liberty (wood only), this Russo is the new kid.
oppirs
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Russo / Lopi
Stove/Furnace Model: CW #2 / Liberty

Re: Initial firing of new stove - Coal or Wood?

PostBy: SteveZee On: Tue Sep 25, 2012 10:49 am

I'd go with the wood fires initially not just to "cure" the new stove but like the others said, you don't need a 24hr fire yet. Wood is easy and you got some. I always have some maple laying around that I split up and store for spring and fall chilly nights or whatever. Once I light the coal fire I want to let it go and get into the rhythms of shake and fill. It's to messy to keep refiring a coal fire.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

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