Dirty chimney?

Dirty chimney?

PostBy: rberq On: Tue Dec 04, 2007 8:47 am

This is my first year with a coal stove after many years burning wood and frequent chimney cleanings to fight creosote. My stove is a Harman Mark I. I have read that my metal chimney should be cleaned in the Spring so sulfur residues won't combine with moist summer air and dissolve the metal. How about during the burning season? Is a dangerous level of soot likely to collect anywhere, that could cause a chimney fire? How about fly ash? Is there anywhere the ash will collect either in the stove or the chimney and block the flue? My chimney configuration is just a single ninety-degree elbow at the stove and then a straight shot up through stovepipe and chimney.
rberq
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine 1300
Coal Size/Type: Nut -- Kimmel/Blaschak/Reading
Other Heating: Oil hot water radiators, propane

Re: Dirty chimney?

PostBy: WNY On: Tue Dec 04, 2007 9:03 am

That's the beauty of coal, there is no flamable afterburn materials, just the fly ash and maybe a bit of dirt/soot. It will mostly collect on horizontal runs of pipe and/or the clean-out of the chimney (if equiped). Yes, it should be cleaned as soon as possible after you shutdown, I believe there is a solution (like baking soda/water?) to neutrilize the ash.

I ran my one stove for almost 3 months and only had 1/4-1/2" of ash in the horizontal run before the chimney.
WNY
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90K, Leisure Line Hyfire I
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker, LL & CoalTrol
Stove/Furnace Model: 90K, Hyfire I, VF3000 Soon

Re: Dirty chimney?

PostBy: LsFarm On: Tue Dec 04, 2007 10:06 am

If you change that 90* to a TEE with a cap closing the opening facing the room, then you can just remove the cap, look into the flue, inspect for flyash accumulation on the horizontal stretch of pipe. Vacuum it out if needed and close up, all in about 5 minutes...

a lot of forum members use this settup, and some install a barometric damper instead of the cap.

Greg L
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland


Re: Dirty chimney?

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Tue Dec 04, 2007 10:24 am

Replace the 90* at the back of the stove with a Tee and place a cap on the open end with a few screws. The Mark series stoves tend to accumulate ash behind the baffle plate, also in the bottom of the elbow. You can just remove the cap and vacuum it all out, although you will have to use your hand to get the ash out from behind the plate on either side of the vent opening. I usually clean mine about every month or so.

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The tee will also extend cleaning intervals, the 90 will fill up faster. Also the tee & cap eliminates the problem of the ash dumping out onto the floor when you remove the elbow.
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Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

Re: Dirty chimney?

PostBy: rberq On: Tue Dec 04, 2007 10:54 am

The tee is a great idea. Thanks. Is it really OK to install the barometric damper on the end of the tee, rather than a cap? I am visualizing the momentum of the hot gases carrying small amounts past the vertical and out into the room. There's got to be a lot of turbulence right there where the flue gases change direction.
rberq
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine 1300
Coal Size/Type: Nut -- Kimmel/Blaschak/Reading
Other Heating: Oil hot water radiators, propane

Re: Dirty chimney?

PostBy: Matthaus On: Tue Dec 04, 2007 10:57 am

It works fine but is not the manufacturers recommended location. You will need a manometer or draft gauge to measure the draft since the weight positions will not be accurate in horizontal or vertical in this position.

IMO I would not install the baro in this position unless you have a way to monitor the draft. :)
Matthaus
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Leisure Line WL110 Dual Fuel, natural gas
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Leisure Line Lil' Heater (rental house)
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Buckwheat Anthracite

Re: Dirty chimney?

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Tue Dec 04, 2007 9:34 pm

I've set the damper up with a manometer, it maintains a steady -.05 " WC. I know a lot of people don't think this position is right for the baro, but it works well, with no leakage into the room. I have found that the chimney drafts a lot more then I thought, the baro stays open at least half way with a full fire burning.

I feel the only way to insure that the draft is set properly is with a manometer, it's just an approximation otherwise, and the manometers are not that costly.
Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

Re: Dirty chimney?

PostBy: rberq On: Tue Dec 04, 2007 10:29 pm

How much does a reasonable manometer cost? Can you recommend a brand and a source?
rberq
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine 1300
Coal Size/Type: Nut -- Kimmel/Blaschak/Reading
Other Heating: Oil hot water radiators, propane

Re: Dirty chimney?

PostBy: Matthaus On: Wed Dec 05, 2007 12:53 am

You should be able to find a Dwyer MkII Model 25 for around $25 to $35 with shipping on ebay. This model is 0 to 3" WC so you will be using it at the lower end of the scale (-.02" to -.06" WC). I have a few Model 40 (measure in 0 to 30 MM instead of inches) for $15 each plus shipping (I bought 9 of them on ebay awhile back). PM me if you want one. :)
Matthaus
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Leisure Line WL110 Dual Fuel, natural gas
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Leisure Line Lil' Heater (rental house)
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Buckwheat Anthracite

Re: Dirty chimney?

PostBy: rberq On: Wed Dec 05, 2007 4:01 pm

Thanks for the recommendation. So, from looking at the MkII Model 25 on Dwyer's web site, and having watched my furnace guy, I am guessing that I would
(1) Make a small hole in my stove pipe, near the outlet of the stove
(2) Get a bit of copper or other metal tubing that will tolerate flue gas temperatures
(3) Connect the flexible manometer tubing to my metal tubing
(4) Level the manometer and zero-adjust the fluid
(5) Shove my copper tubing into the stove pipe hole, to the center of the pipe, and take a reading
(6) Adjust the barometric damper weight
(7) Take additional readings and continue to adjust the baro unti I get the .06 called for by Harman
All the above while the stove is operating "normally" at a steady state.

Does the manometer come with its own metal probe, or do I have to make something heat-tolerant as described above? And if I do make my own probe, is the inside diameter of the tubing critical or not? (I DID pay attention in high school physics, but it's been a long time....)
rberq
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine 1300
Coal Size/Type: Nut -- Kimmel/Blaschak/Reading
Other Heating: Oil hot water radiators, propane

Re: Dirty chimney?

PostBy: Matthaus On: Wed Dec 05, 2007 6:01 pm

The manometer doesn't come with a piece of metal tubing. The probe can be a piece of brake line or any other metal tubing that will fit the tube on the manometer. Once you have the piece of metal tubing then you drill the hole, it needs to be snug so as to measure the negative pressure. Only has to be inserted far enough to measure the draft, it is not measuring velocity.

Have fun. :D
Matthaus
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Leisure Line WL110 Dual Fuel, natural gas
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Leisure Line Lil' Heater (rental house)
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Buckwheat Anthracite

Re: Dirty chimney?

PostBy: spc On: Wed Dec 05, 2007 6:22 pm

The Dwyer Model 25 comes with the fittings to bolt into the flue pipe. Just buy a length of brake line & you are all set. Don't even use the supplied tubing. You will only be using one side of the manometer.
spc
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Pioneer