Glenwood 6 Restoration

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: wsherrick On: Sun Oct 28, 2012 5:12 pm

dlj wrote:Looks like you are doing an awesome job on the restoration! The seal on the back of the stove where the back smoke shelf and the sheet metal join is particularly problematic. I imagine you are going to put some rope gasket there also when you put that together. I'll be very interested in hearing how it works for you. Last year I pulled mine apart there and put furnace cement all around that join and then bolted it back together. Looks good for this year at this point. I don't know how long it will last though. I thought about putting rope gasket in there but there is not much to hold it so opted just for the cement. Let us know how you do that joint.

Another question, did you take the dampers off the doors? If so how do they come off? I've been thinking about taking mine off but don't know how to remove them.

dj


I asked Emery about gasketing around the exit seal and he about had a coronary. He was adamant that it wouldn't be good.
Remember what I did with mine. I used fender washers on the inside and flat washers on the out side. That seal has not budged. The fender washers distribute the pulling force of the bolts over the area of the back plate, yet allows for the barrel and the plate to expand and contract without breaking the seal.
To take off the dampers is an involved process. You have to heat the peen on the inside of the door and drive out the pin from the inside. Then you can replace the springs under the caps, clamp the whole thing back together and repeen the pin on the back.
Maybe someone else has thought of an easier way to do it. If so I hope they share.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: dlj On: Sun Oct 28, 2012 5:25 pm

wsherrick wrote:
I asked Emery about gasketing around the exit seal and he about had a coronary. He was adamant that it wouldn't be good.
Remember what I did with mine. I used fender washers on the inside and flat washers on the out side. That seal has not budged. The fender washers distribute the pulling force of the bolts over the area of the back plate, yet allows for the barrel and the plate to expand and contract without breaking the seal.
To take off the dampers is an involved process. You have to heat the peen on the inside of the door and drive out the pin from the inside. Then you can replace the springs under the caps, clamp the whole thing back together and repeen the pin on the back.
Maybe someone else has thought of an easier way to do it. If so I hope they share.


Glad I brought the question up... I didn't use washers on the outside, the bolts sit in the cast iron part, that spreads the load out nicely. I did use fender washers on the inside though, as the cast iron piece in there is a lot thinner and it seemed like a good idea. That seal on mine looks very good right now also, but it's only gone through one heating season so far. It's not that big of a deal to take it apart and re-seal it, I just would like to see lower and lower maintenance...

I've been looking at those dampers and was hoping there was an easier way... That does not sound easy to do... I'd really like to replace the spring on my top door damper. One of the bottom door dampers is a bit loose also, but not too bad. I'd also like to re-nickel my dampers, they originally were nickel plated...

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: SteveZee On: Sun Oct 28, 2012 5:46 pm

William had a trick with a 1/4" washer with a slot cut that can be slipped under the spring knob, lifted slightly with a screw driver, that will tighten up a weak spring on the dampers.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

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Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: echos67 On: Sun Oct 28, 2012 7:06 pm

dlj wrote:Looks like you are doing an awesome job on the restoration! The seal on the back of the stove where the back smoke shelf and the sheet metal join is particularly problematic. I imagine you are going to put some rope gasket there also when you put that together. I'll be very interested in hearing how it works for you. Last year I pulled mine apart there and put furnace cement all around that join and then bolted it back together. Looks good for this year at this point. I don't know how long it will last though. I thought about putting rope gasket in there but there is not much to hold it so opted just for the cement. Let us know how you do that joint.

Another question, did you take the dampers off the doors? If so how do they come off? I've been thinking about taking mine off but don't know how to remove them.

dj


Thanks DJ,
Maybe you could tell the story about buying your 6 sometime :D ?

I have already attached flat gasket to the inside bracket but only putting the cement between the bracket and gasket, I am doing the same on the smoke shelf as well i just havent gotten it installed yet. I will end up with the bracket then cement, then gasket, then barrel, then gasket, then cement, then smoke shelf with the gaskets not being cemented to the barrel but instead sandwiched to the barrel. I hope this allows me a maintenance free seal while still allowing expansion and contraction between the 2 different metals at different rates and enough flexability to give a leak free seal.

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As for the dampers, I got the area that is peened over glowing hot and got it straight to allow it to slide through the door, I then took a punch and very gently tapped it against the rod that holds the damper on (the peened part) and it cracked the door itself behind the damper so I immediately stopped. Those 2 parts have became joined well enough over the years that they can stay that way on this door since I wont chance breaking out the entire center hub. With the damper loose I stiffened it up by putting a few wraps of wire around the pin by using a pick to compress the spring and she works as it should again.
Last edited by echos67 on Sun Oct 28, 2012 7:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: echos67 On: Sun Oct 28, 2012 7:07 pm

SteveZee wrote:William had a trick with a 1/4" washer with a slot cut that can be slipped under the spring knob, lifted slightly with a screw driver, that will tighten up a weak spring on the dampers.


I forgot about that :oops: , that may have been easier then the wire wraps and last longer too :x
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: wsherrick On: Sun Oct 28, 2012 7:40 pm

The washer works very well to fix a weak spring. It is very easy to do and is effective. The dampers on the Glenwood 9 are perfectly air tight and they move quite smoothly.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: dlj On: Sun Oct 28, 2012 10:07 pm

echos67 wrote:
Thanks DJ,
Maybe you could tell the story about buying your 6 sometime :D ?


Try this thread...

The Rolls Royce Of Stoves-The Base Burner

echos67 wrote:I have already attached flat gasket to the inside bracket but only putting the cement between the bracket and gasket, I am doing the same on the smoke shelf as well i just havent gotten it installed yet. I will end up with the bracket then cement, then gasket, then barrel, then gasket, then cement, then smoke shelf with the gaskets not being cemented to the barrel but instead sandwiched to the barrel. I hope this allows me a maintenance free seal while still allowing expansion and contraction between the 2 different metals at different rates and enough flexability to give a leak free seal.


No gasket on the inside is needed at all. Read the posts above on putting a gasket on this joint... You may wish to reconsider. No real difference in expansion and contraction on the two metals...

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: echos67 On: Sun Nov 04, 2012 7:57 pm

Hey William, I forgot to say thanks for the info on the chair :oops: .

Update as to the state of the Glenwood is that I called the plating guy Friday and was hoping to send my pieces off for replating of the nickel, but he still isn't up and running just yet. I believe he has to finish the wiring for the equipment and it should be done this coming week if everything goes well for them.

I will send of the pieces once he is up and running again, and I want to make one more addition before finishing the final assembly and then it is on to making the hearth. Anyone with experience building a hearth want to come help ? :D
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: nortcan On: Sun Nov 04, 2012 9:54 pm

Keith, do you have some beers :?: :lol:
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: echos67 On: Sun Nov 04, 2012 10:00 pm

nortcan wrote:Keith, do you have some beers :?: :lol:


Pierre I stopped drinking 12 years ago but for you and anyone else that would like to help I will supply the beer and drive to go Smitty dishwasher looking :lol: !

I may need the plating company you used if you still have the contact for them I could see what it may cost to send to them to do the plating.
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: echos67 On: Mon Nov 12, 2012 7:45 pm

One of the great members of NEPA recently sold and shipped me some of the ram type liner material for linning my fire pot, Thank You SteveZee !

I put it to use and added a 1/2" layer to the Fire Pot. There is a total liner thickness of 3/4" as now my 16" Firepot is at 14 1/2". I think I removed an 1 1/2" this year of the old original bricks and cement or whatever was used to fix them. I should be able to hold more volume of coal now and still be safe in keeping my liner from cracking. I like this product, easy to work with and I am thinking it will last a very long time.

Now I can finish the stove assembly minus the Nickel.

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echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: dlj On: Mon Nov 12, 2012 8:51 pm

echos67 wrote:One of the great members of NEPA recently sold and shipped me some of the ram type liner material for linning my fire pot, Thank You SteveZee !

I put it to use and added a 1/2" layer to the Fire Pot. There is a total liner thickness of 3/4" as now my 16" Firepot is at 14 1/2". I think I removed an 1 1/2" this year of the old original bricks and cement or whatever was used to fix them. I should be able to hold more volume of coal now and still be safe in keeping my liner from cracking. I like this product, easy to work with and I am thinking it will last a very long time.

Now I can finish the stove assembly minus the Nickel.


Fire pot won't crack (usually), just burn out over time. the ceramic liner keeps that from happening, as it takes the beating, not the cast iron. That said, if your cast iron fire pot is in good shape, you would probably have to run for 100 years or so to burn it out ;) - I ran my stove for a couple decades with no liner and when I brought it to Emery to restore it (for other reasons) he told me it was one of the best condition fire pots he'd seen on a #6 ....

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: echos67 On: Mon Nov 12, 2012 9:48 pm

dlj wrote:
echos67 wrote:One of the great members of NEPA recently sold and shipped me some of the ram type liner material for linning my fire pot, Thank You SteveZee !

I put it to use and added a 1/2" layer to the Fire Pot. There is a total liner thickness of 3/4" as now my 16" Firepot is at 14 1/2". I think I removed an 1 1/2" this year of the old original bricks and cement or whatever was used to fix them. I should be able to hold more volume of coal now and still be safe in keeping my liner from cracking. I like this product, easy to work with and I am thinking it will last a very long time.

Now I can finish the stove assembly minus the Nickel.


Fire pot won't crack (usually), just burn out over time. the ceramic liner keeps that from happening, as it takes the beating, not the cast iron. That said, if your cast iron fire pot is in good shape, you would probably have to run for 100 years or so to burn it out ;) - I ran my stove for a couple decades with no liner and when I brought it to Emery to restore it (for other reasons) he told me it was one of the best condition fire pots he'd seen on a #6 ....

dj


DJ, I did not know that these fire pots were that stout although they are very heavy. Mine appears to be in very good shape but I figure why not keep it that way.

Just curious,
When you were using yours without a liner in it did you notice more heat at the same temps you run now with a liner ?
What is the thickness of the liner in your fire pot ?
Last year when I ran the Summit without a liner the fire pot actually started to glow, did your glen wood ever do that and at what temp ?
Last edited by echos67 on Tue Nov 13, 2012 7:00 am, edited 1 time in total.
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: dlj On: Mon Nov 12, 2012 10:14 pm

echos67 wrote:
DJ, I did not know that these fire pots were that stout although they are very heavy. Mine appears to be in very good shape but I figure why not keep it that way.

Just curious,
When you were using yours without a liner in it did you notice more heat at the same temps you run now with a liner ?
What is the thickness of the liner in your fire pot ?
Last year when I ran the Summit without a liner the fire pot actually started to glow, did your glue wood ever do that and at what temp ?


Yes, best to keep it in as good a shape as you can. The ceramic liner is a really good way to go.

I'm not sure how thick the liner in my fire pot is, 3/8" would be a guess?

I used to run my Glenwood quite hot when I was in the house tending the fire. Many nights I ran with the whole fire pot running a dull red, or a bit more. Can't tell you what the temperature was, I never ran a thermometer on my stove until about 4 years ago. Then I got one and put it on my stove. It was just a few weeks ago that I actually bought a second thermometer and put it on my chimney. Now I'm starting to see just how low I run my stack temperature compared to my stove temperature. Right now my Glenwood is running about 350 on the side of my stove and barely 100 on the stack. When it was colder last week, I was running my stove temp at about 550 and my stack temp was hitting about 130. I'm going to start keeping notes on it.

These temperatures are pretty low. I wish I had thermometer readings from before. My gut feeling is there is a slight decrease in the temperature output with the ceramic liner in place compared to without. But I don't have any numbers. From the past few years when I've been running the thermometer, I'd say the stove must have been running up around 800 to 900 on the side wall up top to have the base running the dull red color. I find it difficult to run those high temperatures with coal, you need to be burning wood to get up that high. The Glenwood is hard to push over about 725 on the side wall with coal. When it gets real cold here, I will have the stove running 650 to close to 700 with coal, but it's hard to go above that in what I'd call steady state burning with coal. I don't think I'd have any problem running a 100 to 200 degrees hotter with wood, would just have to feed it every 3 or 4 hours.

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: nortcan On: Mon Nov 12, 2012 10:43 pm

Very good job on the fire pot liner. Will last forever!
Chrome Black Lake,
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Fax. 1.418.423.6911
P/S, sorry for the long delay, I didn't see this before today :oops:
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

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