Glenwood 6 Restoration

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: wsherrick On: Tue Nov 13, 2012 3:49 am

Very nice Nephew. If you don't bang the liner with a poker, it will last for many years. Remember to cure it first with a few small fires.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: echos67 On: Tue Nov 13, 2012 7:46 am

dlj wrote:
echos67 wrote:
DJ, I did not know that these fire pots were that stout although they are very heavy. Mine appears to be in very good shape but I figure why not keep it that way.

Just curious,
When you were using yours without a liner in it did you notice more heat at the same temps you run now with a liner ?
What is the thickness of the liner in your fire pot ?
Last year when I ran the Summit without a liner the fire pot actually started to glow, did your glue wood ever do that and at what temp ?


Yes, best to keep it in as good a shape as you can. The ceramic liner is a really good way to go.

I'm not sure how thick the liner in my fire pot is, 3/8" would be a guess?

I used to run my Glenwood quite hot when I was in the house tending the fire. Many nights I ran with the whole fire pot running a dull red, or a bit more. Can't tell you what the temperature was, I never ran a thermometer on my stove until about 4 years ago. Then I got one and put it on my stove. It was just a few weeks ago that I actually bought a second thermometer and put it on my chimney. Now I'm starting to see just how low I run my stack temperature compared to my stove temperature. Right now my Glenwood is running about 350 on the side of my stove and barely 100 on the stack. When it was colder last week, I was running my stove temp at about 550 and my stack temp was hitting about 130. I'm going to start keeping notes on it.

These temperatures are pretty low. I wish I had thermometer readings from before. My gut feeling is there is a slight decrease in the temperature output with the ceramic liner in place compared to without. But I don't have any numbers. From the past few years when I've been running the thermometer, I'd say the stove must have been running up around 800 to 900 on the side wall up top to have the base running the dull red color. I find it difficult to run those high temperatures with coal, you need to be burning wood to get up that high. The Glenwood is hard to push over about 725 on the side wall with coal. When it gets real cold here, I will have the stove running 650 to close to 700 with coal, but it's hard to go above that in what I'd call steady state burning with coal. I don't think I'd have any problem running a 100 to 200 degrees hotter with wood, would just have to feed it every 3 or 4 hours.

dj


That is seriously cranking out some heat at those temps, I bet you had a hard time getting within 3' of the stove when it ran those temps :lol:, still another first hand experience of what these base heaters are capable of.

Those thermometer readings are very impressive on the flue in relation to the stove temp, it sure shows the amount of heat going into the house as opposed to out the flue.
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: echos67 On: Tue Nov 13, 2012 7:52 am

nortcan wrote:Very good job on the fire pot liner. Will last forever!
Chrome Black Lake,
Tel. 1.418.423.5057
Fax. 1.418.423.6911
P/S, sorry for the long delay, I didn't see this before today :oops:


Thanks Pierre I will call NuChrome again today if I get a chance and see if he is up and running yet, if not I will call your guys. Your plating looked really great on the Bride from the pictures, still no issues and your very happy with it ?
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Visit Hitzer Stoves

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: echos67 On: Tue Nov 13, 2012 7:58 am

wsherrick wrote:Very nice Nephew. If you don't bang the liner with a poker, it will last for many years. Remember to cure it first with a few small fires.


Thank you Uncle William, good point about the poker I will be mindful of that.

Small fires it is for curing, of course at the rate I'm going (need hearth) it may air dry by the time I get around to lighting it off :lol: . I need to make time and get busy on this hearth install ! With all the polish this thing has inside and out I'm sure it will smell up the house for a few fires :lol:.
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: SteveZee On: Tue Nov 13, 2012 10:35 am

Keith, No thanks needed my Brother in coal. I know well enough that you and many other of our friends here would do the same and have done. Paying it forward is our motto. :D

Now to the liner: You did an outstanding job! That looks to have come out allot better then mine did! :oops: We learn as we go but I can tell you that the next time I have the stove apart, I may "reline" mine over again and go thinner this time. Mine is a full inch and could have been a bit smoother too. If and when I redo it, I'll go half of that (1/2") and get some of that coal capacity back too. ;) On the other hand I know my pot is well protected and insulated and the stove seems to have plenty of output for my space. Great job and the sides look very smooth and even. Did you use the wet sponge/scotchbright technique?
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: nortcan On: Tue Nov 13, 2012 11:20 am

echos67 wrote:
nortcan wrote:Very good job on the fire pot liner. Will last forever!
Chrome Black Lake,
Tel. 1.418.423.5057
Fax. 1.418.423.6911
P/S, sorry for the long delay, I didn't see this before today :oops:


Thanks Pierre I will call NuChrome again today if I get a chance and see if he is up and running yet, if not I will call your guys. Your plating looked really great on the Bride from the pictures, still no issues and your very happy with it ?


Keith, the nickel is ""show Grade"" from that shop. Plus they made some works on parts on the Bride and also on the Sunnyside to restore them as day one. They just do the job as YOU want it to be done...they make many jobs for peoples in USA.
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nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: echos67 On: Tue Nov 13, 2012 8:03 pm

SteveZee wrote:Keith, No thanks needed my Brother in coal. I know well enough that you and many other of our friends here would do the same and have done. Paying it forward is our motto. :D

Now to the liner: You did an outstanding job! That looks to have come out allot better then mine did! :oops: We learn as we go but I can tell you that the next time I have the stove apart, I may "reline" mine over again and go thinner this time. Mine is a full inch and could have been a bit smoother too. If and when I redo it, I'll go half of that (1/2") and get some of that coal capacity back too. ;) On the other hand I know my pot is well protected and insulated and the stove seems to have plenty of output for my space. Great job and the sides look very smooth and even. Did you use the wet sponge/scotchbright technique?


Steve, I did use a wet sponge pretty liberally and it ended up pretty much useless very quickly, the course liner material ate it up so I went down to the garage and grabbed one of those pads for putting wax on a car and it worked very well. It held enough water to do the job but not so much that the water dripped all over the grates and down into the base which made clean up easy.

This evening I put the barrel onto the fire pot (with a gasket) and bolted them together, then I was able to finish the install of the fire rings. Tomorrow will be the smoke shelf and back pipe final assembly then the top will be the last item left. Work gets in the way but if it cooperates I should have the 6 finished this week :D !
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: echos67 On: Tue Nov 13, 2012 8:12 pm

nortcan wrote:
echos67 wrote:
nortcan wrote:Very good job on the fire pot liner. Will last forever!
Chrome Black Lake,
Tel. 1.418.423.5057
Fax. 1.418.423.6911
P/S, sorry for the long delay, I didn't see this before today :oops:


Thanks Pierre I will call NuChrome again today if I get a chance and see if he is up and running yet, if not I will call your guys. Your plating looked really great on the Bride from the pictures, still no issues and your very happy with it ?


Keith, the nickel is ""show Grade"" from that shop. Plus they made some works on parts on the Bride and also on the Sunnyside to restore them as day one. They just do the job as YOU want it to be done...they make many jobs for peoples in USA.


I called Chrome Black Lake today Pierre, the guy I spoke to was very helpful. He said I could take pictures of my nickel pieces and send them to the website and they would give me a estimate of the price based on the pictures as best they could. That is a great idea for me because I can have an estimate of the replating and figure the costs of shipping by the weight to Quebec and have a very close idea of the total costs. He also explained the repair process you spoke of, overall a very good call and I will be sending them pictures very soon. Your Nickel looks outstanding and that is what I am after at this point since all the work and time that has been put into this stove.

Thanks for the reference Pierre.
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: dlj On: Tue Nov 13, 2012 11:17 pm

echos67 wrote:
That is seriously cranking out some heat at those temps, I bet you had a hard time getting within 3' of the stove when it ran those temps :lol:, still another first hand experience of what these base heaters are capable of.

Those thermometer readings are very impressive on the flue in relation to the stove temp, it sure shows the amount of heat going into the house as opposed to out the flue.


I used to sit on my sofa that was in front of the stove but on the other side of the room and bask in the heat... Back then I never even thought about things like "longevity of the stove" or "don't over heat the metal"... I could get that stove cooking and get real toasty... Was living in an old Victorian house with what must have been 10 foot ceilings... And no insulation...

It's been really interesting to watch the flue temps with my newly installed thermometer. I'll open up the back valve when stoking the fire up and the flue temp will climb up to 300 - 400 degrees or so. Flip the lever with the fire how I want back to base burner mode and watch the flue temp just drop right down...

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: wsherrick On: Wed Nov 14, 2012 1:36 am

dlj wrote:
echos67 wrote:
That is seriously cranking out some heat at those temps, I bet you had a hard time getting within 3' of the stove when it ran those temps :lol:, still another first hand experience of what these base heaters are capable of.

Those thermometer readings are very impressive on the flue in relation to the stove temp, it sure shows the amount of heat going into the house as opposed to out the flue.


I used to sit on my sofa that was in front of the stove but on the other side of the room and bask in the heat... Back then I never even thought about things like "longevity of the stove" or "don't over heat the metal"... I could get that stove cooking and get real toasty... Was living in an old Victorian house with what must have been 10 foot ceilings... And no insulation...

It's been really interesting to watch the flue temps with my newly installed thermometer. I'll open up the back valve when stoking the fire up and the flue temp will climb up to 300 - 400 degrees or so. Flip the lever with the fire how I want back to base burner mode and watch the flue temp just drop right down...

dj


It's simply amazing isn't it. To have a stove cooking along at 600 degrees and the stack temp. be 120-130.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: nortcan On: Wed Nov 14, 2012 10:00 pm

Keith, what product did you used for the liner? Your liner looks very good. If you have some photos showing the product's container so it could help to find the same, if possible for you to do so.
Thanks
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: nortcan On: Wed Nov 14, 2012 10:05 pm

SteveZee wrote:Keith, No thanks needed my Brother in coal. I know well enough that you and many other of our friends here would do the same and have done. Paying it forward is our motto. :D

Now to the liner: You did an outstanding job! That looks to have come out allot better then mine did! :oops: We learn as we go but I can tell you that the next time I have the stove apart, I may "reline" mine over again and go thinner this time. Mine is a full inch and could have been a bit smoother too. If and when I redo it, I'll go half of that (1/2") and get some of that coal capacity back too. ;) On the other hand I know my pot is well protected and insulated and the stove seems to have plenty of output for my space. Great job and the sides look very smooth and even. Did you use the wet sponge/scotchbright technique?


Steve you restoration job and the fire pot liner are excellent. A good thing about this forum is that we can learn so much from each other one.
If I never saw this forum, I probably would still be burning wood :mad: If an info can helps one person it is a win.
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: dlj On: Wed Nov 14, 2012 11:06 pm

wsherrick wrote:
It's simply amazing isn't it. To have a stove cooking along at 600 degrees and the stack temp. be 120-130.


Amazing is the right word!

I haven't been up in the 600 range yet, not cold enough out, but right now I'm up in the 400s as it is a bit chilly tonight. I just stoked up for the night, so right now it doesn't make sense to look, but a couple hours ago the stove was running in the mid-400s and the stack temp was about 130 IIRC. When it gets colder, I'll start taking notes. How far from your stove is your flue thermometer? My stove has the damper 6 inches from the back of the stove and the thermometer is 6 inches further back from that, so it's 12 inches from the back of my stove.

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: wsherrick On: Thu Nov 15, 2012 1:37 am

The thermometer is about 3 feet or so from the stove collar. It's at the point where the pipe elbows into the thimble. The pipe damper is about 1,1/2 feet from the collar. Even with the pipe damper wide open, and the stove running at 450-500, the thermometer stands at about 115 degrees at that point. I can touch it with my bare hand as long as I want to. On warmer days (50 degrees plus) I run the stove in direct draft because the flue is not provided enough heat to maintain any semblance of draft. In direct draft and the stove at 400-450, the pipe never exceeds 200-250 degrees.
I get similar results from the Glenwood No 9. The only difference is that the No 9 will burn a very small amount of coal constantly without fear of it going out. The fire pot design maintains a very high temperature in the fire bed, well over the amount needed to maintain combustion. Even with an extremely small amount of coal.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Glenwood 6 Restoration

PostBy: SteveZee On: Thu Nov 15, 2012 9:58 am

nortcan wrote:
SteveZee wrote:Keith, No thanks needed my Brother in coal. I know well enough that you and many other of our friends here would do the same and have done. Paying it forward is our motto. :D

Now to the liner: You did an outstanding job! That looks to have come out allot better then mine did! :oops: We learn as we go but I can tell you that the next time I have the stove apart, I may "reline" mine over again and go thinner this time. Mine is a full inch and could have been a bit smoother too. If and when I redo it, I'll go half of that (1/2") and get some of that coal capacity back too. ;) On the other hand I know my pot is well protected and insulated and the stove seems to have plenty of output for my space. Great job and the sides look very smooth and even. Did you use the wet sponge/scotchbright technique?


Steve you restoration job and the fire pot liner are excellent. A good thing about this forum is that we can learn so much from each other one.
If I never saw this forum, I probably would still be burning wood :mad: If an info can helps one person it is a win.


That is exactly right Pierre! We all learn together and share our findings. I too might still be "on wood" had I not stumbled to this great site.

The liner material Keith used was the Noxram refractory material that I had left over. :D
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Visit Hitzer Stoves