Baseboard, radiator

Baseboard, radiator

PostBy: JJLL On: Thu Dec 06, 2007 11:39 am

Greyhounds post made me think - Hydronic Seminar

How many of you use this method? I'm going to hookup a water coil from my stove to the hot water tank, but now that I'm thinking, to tap into the water lines of my radiators isn't a bad idea. I've seen this product/layout - http://www.hilkoil.com/Hilkoil6.jpg this is found here under the "technical" section - http://www.hilkoil.com/

Can anyone give first hand experience on this?

Thanks
JJLL
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Harman SF-360 Boiler

Re: Baseboard, radiator

PostBy: WNY On: Thu Dec 06, 2007 12:54 pm

I dont; think the small coils would generate enough water temp to be used for your radiators. Maybe a small one for localized heating, but not enough to circulate through your house, that is what boilers are for (Volume).
WNY
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90K, Leisure Line Hyfire I
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker, LL & CoalTrol
Stove/Furnace Model: 90K, Hyfire I, VF3000 Soon

Re: Baseboard, radiator

PostBy: JiminBucks On: Thu Dec 06, 2007 1:00 pm

This might be good as a preheater to the standard furnace on the cold water return, the warmer the water is going back into the furnace = less fuel. :) With the heat from the coal stove the boiler will not fire much anyway!
JiminBucks
 
Stove/Furnace Make: EFEL \ Franco Belge
Stove/Furnace Model: Classic Lion \ Normandie


Re: Baseboard, radiator

PostBy: JJLL On: Thu Dec 06, 2007 1:24 pm

WNY wrote:I dont; think the small coils would generate enough water temp to be used for your radiators. Maybe a small one for localized heating, but not enough to circulate through your house, that is what boilers are for (Volume).


Thats what I thought. But my boiler is set at 165 degrees. Most folks don't know this but boilers don't boil :) A high temperature for a boiler is 190 degrees.

My stove runs between 400 - 500 degree 24/7

For that water/pipes not to heat up is hard for me to believe. My water tank that delivers hot water to my sinks isn't even that hot. As long as the flow of water is steady and the water coil large enough, there should be no problem.... right?
JJLL
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Harman SF-360 Boiler

Re: Baseboard, radiator

PostBy: WNY On: Thu Dec 06, 2007 1:46 pm

I thought you were going to use it stand alone to heat the water in the radiators, but as a pre-heater or hot water tank heater, that should not be a problem as long as you have the correct setup. I still call them boilers, sorry. I am not except on the coils, there are many others on here that are using the Hot Water coil setup for domestic hot water.....just do a search on "Hot water coils"...
WNY
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90K, Leisure Line Hyfire I
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker, LL & CoalTrol
Stove/Furnace Model: 90K, Hyfire I, VF3000 Soon

Re: Baseboard, radiator

PostBy: stokerstove On: Thu Dec 06, 2007 7:27 pm

I use my coil for all my domestic HW and a 4' baseboard heater in the family room. I should have went with a larger baseboard unit but it really helps heat the room. I have it set up so I can bypass the baseboard if I don't want heat to that room. Its pumping the heat out now - I figure that I might as well use some of the coils output where I want it, especially during times when we're not using any hot water, instead of letting the heat build up and possibly blow the TRV.

After returning home from work and with no one home all day, I checked the HW temp at a tap - 170degrees with the baseboard running.

I wouldn't try to heat more than 1 room with a baseboard from a stove's coil though.
stokerstove
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska Kodiak Stokerstove 1

Re: Baseboard, radiator

PostBy: Dano On: Thu Dec 06, 2007 8:49 pm

I have a hilkoil in my harman mark I and it feeds into my boiler the stove is in the basement their are two zones in my 1700 sf house built in 1872 during the heating season I open both zone valves and let the circulator run constantly on warmer days I turn the stove down (80* water) and when its cold I crank the stove up and I can get the water to 140* or 150* unless it is really cold my boiler rarely fires and the house stays between 70* and 75* verry small natural gas bill
Dano
 
Stove/Furnace Make: harman mk1

Re: Baseboard, radiator

PostBy: sandman On: Thu Dec 06, 2007 9:12 pm

Dano wrote:I have a hilkoil in my harman mark I and it feeds into my boiler the stove is in the basement their are two zones in my 1700 sf house built in 1872 during the heating season I open both zone valves and let the circulator run constantly on warmer days I turn the stove down (80* water) and when its cold I crank the stove up and I can get the water to 140* or 150* unless it is really cold my boiler rarely fires and the house stays between 70* and 75* verry small natural gas bill



what size hilkoil did you use? i want to put one in my mark III

tia

jim
sandman
 
Stove/Furnace Make: harman
Stove/Furnace Model: VF3000, mark III sf150&250

Re: Baseboard, radiator

PostBy: Dano On: Thu Dec 06, 2007 9:19 pm

sandman i used the 16" coil shaped like an M I had to shoe horn it in that little mark I but I wanted the most heat transfer if I had room I would put another single loop in their for my dm hot water maybe I just need a bigger stove
Dano
 
Stove/Furnace Make: harman mk1

Re: Baseboard, radiator

PostBy: JJLL On: Fri Dec 07, 2007 11:51 am

Hi Dano,
I've sent you a PM but I'm not sure if it was sent or not?

Thanks for the information you posted. I have a 2800 sqf house built in the 1890's. Its mostly brick and it sucks up all the heat I can make.

I'm thinking of putting two of the largest heating coils I can get into my stove.

The stove itself works great, I'm just having one heck of a time distributing the heat. Did you tap into the cold water return or the outgoing hot water line? Or doesn't it matter. I read that you should put it in the cold water return so that if your boiler needs to turn on, it doesn't need to heat up so much water.

Again, I appreciate your comments.
JJLL
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Harman SF-360 Boiler

Re: Baseboard, radiator

PostBy: George-NJ On: Sat Dec 08, 2007 10:55 am

I have my custom ss coil hooked right into the return line of the baseboard behind the stove, I have the circulator pump constantly running & the oil burner off. with my 17' of coil in my stove I generate a constant flow of 115-125 degrees. While it's not the 180 that usually would cycle through a system intermittantly, the 115-125 constant flow heats the far off rooms comfortbly where fans never worked. It's nice not having fans humming and always in the way, too.

My coil is not directly over the fire, I was afraid of too much heat. If I had it all over to do again I would've had it closer to the fire.

I have an extra 20' length of the 304 ss that I paid $120 for if anyone in the NJ/PA area wants to buy, PM if interested I'm in NJ 07860
coal coil plumbing.jpg
(30.77 KiB) Viewed 114 times
View: New PagePopup • Select:BBCode
[nepathumb]1997[/nepathumb]
[*]
Coil in coal stove.jpg
(28.92 KiB) Viewed 133 times
View: New PagePopup • Select:BBCode
[nepathumb]1998[/nepathumb]
George-NJ
 

Re: Baseboard, radiator

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Sat Dec 08, 2007 11:16 am

JJLL wrote:
WNY wrote:I dont; think the small coils would generate enough water temp to be used for your radiators. Maybe a small one for localized heating, but not enough to circulate through your house, that is what boilers are for (Volume).


Thats what I thought. But my boiler is set at 165 degrees. Most folks don't know this but boilers don't boil :) A high temperature for a boiler is 190 degrees.

My stove runs between 400 - 500 degree 24/7

For that water/pipes not to heat up is hard for me to believe. My water tank that delivers hot water to my sinks isn't even that hot. As long as the flow of water is steady and the water coil large enough, there should be no problem.... right?


We have been having the boiler/furnace/water heater debate in another thread. Boilers do boil if you have steam heat, though.
Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

Re: Baseboard, radiator

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Sat Dec 08, 2007 11:22 am

One important thing to consider is the flow rate through the coil. If the water is flowing too fast it won't have time to absorb the heat from the fire. To slow, too much heat and it will cool before it reaches it's intended destination.

That's why a car will overheat if you remove the thermostat and go for a ride at highway speeds. The water flows through the radiator too fast to give up the heat it has absorbed.
Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert

Re: Baseboard, radiator

PostBy: Dano On: Sat Dec 08, 2007 9:36 pm

George-NJ wrote:I have my custom ss coil hooked right into the return line of the baseboard behind the stove, I have the circulator pump constantly running & the oil burner off. with my 17' of coil in my stove I generate a constant flow of 115-125 degrees. While it's not the 180 that usually would cycle through a system intermittantly, the 115-125 constant flow heats the far off rooms comfortbly where fans never worked. It's nice not having fans humming and always in the way, too.

My coil is not directly over the fire, I was afraid of too much heat. If I had it all over to do again I would've had it closer to the fire.

I have an extra 20' length of the 304 ss that I paid $120 for if anyone in the NJ/PA area wants to buy, PM if interested I'm in NJ 07860
coal coil plumbing.jpg
[*]
Coil in coal stove.jpg

on average i get the same 115* to 125* temps as well i can crank the stove up and get 140* i constantly run the circulator i only have about 5' of coil but it is right above the fire we dont lose power much but i think about what i will do when the power does go out
Dano
 
Stove/Furnace Make: harman mk1