So I started my hearth area demo

So I started my hearth area demo

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Mon Dec 24, 2012 5:35 am

Ok so the wife has been bugging me about organizing the house so I did and while I was at it I decided to start demoing the wall where the chimney is. .... Good and bad news. Good news is all the wood is dry and in good condition running vertical. Bad news is that a large horizontal beam that the studs are sitting on which used to be the outside of the oldest part of the house is rotted through on the end where it was supported by the chimney... So I don't know what to do really . It looks like it has been sitting that way for years so do I just patch it up or attempt to do patch work or replacement? Replacement means the hearth area has too wait and major work needs to be done. Moving on and leaving it means I can continue but I'm inclined to fix it ... I don't think I can make it under the house either . It's too small under there.

Anyways aside from that what should I do for this wall? I planned on hardie board for part of the wall to expand the masonry out . I have never done any tile work or masonry other than lime mortar and brick. I'm looking for some ideas really . Whatever I do on the left I will do on the right by the window as well. What do you guys think would give me the most protection and least amount of weight? I am also building the hearth to except a larger stove larger than the WM . Whatever I do I want to finish most of it in the next two weeks .

I also found the original flooring under the existing hardwood. So my floor is diagnol subflooring (boards) , original hand cut flooring and then another said of machine cut flooring. Interesting way that they just slapped the floors on top of the floors .

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Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Nut / Anthracite

Re: So I started my hearth area demo

PostBy: Boots On: Mon Dec 24, 2012 7:48 am

that looks like it may have been at one time or is now damp. you need to verify that there is no moisture there. it could be from the roof leaking or leaking pipes. If that is wet and you make the repair but do not find the source of the water it will end up rotting completely. I recently had a pipe start leaking in my wall, between 2 bathtubs. I had almost no access to the leak. i found out it was leaking because the under side of the floor was wet (in the basement). had i not had a basement i never would have known about the leak untill something rotted through, or the leak got big enough that i could hear it run.
Boots
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Burnham SFB 101 (sold)

Re: So I started my hearth area demo

PostBy: Poconoeagle On: Mon Dec 24, 2012 7:53 am

If there is some support and strength , I would look into using the penetrant stuff that will harden the wood. old wooden boat restorers use it.
if theres a way to get under and support by all means...
Poconoeagle
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Buckwalter & Co. , EFM520
Stove/Furnace Model: No. 28 Glenwood 1880, Alaska

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Re: So I started my hearth area demo

PostBy: freetown fred On: Mon Dec 24, 2012 8:15 am

Patch it, old school theory--do NOT try to replace, it's been there forever & won't get worse, or it woulda by now--I've never used it but the stuff PE mentioned sounds worth the effort. Hardie board???? concrete bd? Good idea. On the tile--what type--NOT design--TYPE-- size, thickness??? when doing walls, it's more about tyhe mastic then anything else. When you get to the tile part---we'll talk--I think I was pretty helpful to LS Farm when he got into his tile projects--it's one of the many things my Dad taught me.
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freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut/Stove mix

Re: So I started my hearth area demo

PostBy: Poconoeagle On: Mon Dec 24, 2012 9:27 am

Gee fred looks like you been "Re-Tiled" for a while :D :lol: 8-)
Poconoeagle
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Buckwalter & Co. , EFM520
Stove/Furnace Model: No. 28 Glenwood 1880, Alaska

Re: So I started my hearth area demo

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Mon Dec 24, 2012 9:42 am

Boots wrote:that looks like it may have been at one time or is now damp. you need to verify that there is no moisture there. it could be from the roof leaking or leaking pipes. If that is wet and you make the repair but do not find the source of the water it will end up rotting completely. I recently had a pipe start leaking in my wall, between 2 bathtubs. I had almost no access to the leak. i found out it was leaking because the under side of the floor was wet (in the basement). had i not had a basement i never would have known about the leak untill something rotted through, or the leak got big enough that i could hear it run.


It had been leaking before I bought the house. Using a moisture meter it was determined dry when I bought the house. The roof was put in a year before I bought the place. This is the oldest part of the house and it was the outside wall but beind that side of the wall is a bathroom now that was added in the 20's so right above was where a roof met the wall .

freetown fred wrote:Patch it, old school theory--do NOT try to replace, it's been there forever & won't get worse, or it woulda by now--I've never used it but the stuff PE mentioned sounds worth the effort. Hardie board???? concrete bd? Good idea. On the tile--what type--NOT design--TYPE-- size, thickness??? when doing walls, it's more about tyhe mastic then anything else. When you get to the tile part---we'll talk--I think I was pretty helpful to LS Farm when he got into his tile projects--it's one of the many things my Dad taught me.


Fred I'm going to go with you you on this one . I really don't think it's a good idea to try replace anything. I just am afraid that I can't get under the house to do what I need to do. Not to mention it freeks me out but I'm not thin enough I don't think ! If I was going to replace I would have to rip out all of the oak flooring which is not going to happen !

I will talk to you when it comes to tile. What would be the most abrasive friendly tile btw? What is better recess the tile/masonry or build up on top of the floor? Hmmm I guess if I recessed the hearth I could pull up a certain amount of flooring and have access to the support beams .

Poconoeagle wrote:If there is some support and strength , I would look into using the penetrant stuff that will harden the wood. old wooden boat restorers use it.
if theres a way to get under and support by all means...


Great idea I will try and pick up some soon. Any local hardware store or special order you think?
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Nut / Anthracite

Re: So I started my hearth area demo

PostBy: freetown fred On: Mon Dec 24, 2012 9:43 am

It's damn sure not cut out to be all I was thinking. PS---CUTE :clap: toothy
freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut/Stove mix

Re: So I started my hearth area demo

PostBy: Poconoeagle On: Mon Dec 24, 2012 9:51 am

west marine..."get rot" or cpes or min wax makes a product..... drill small holes to let it penetrate ;)
Poconoeagle
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Buckwalter & Co. , EFM520
Stove/Furnace Model: No. 28 Glenwood 1880, Alaska

Re: So I started my hearth area demo

PostBy: coalkirk On: Mon Dec 24, 2012 10:17 am

Fred...what's up with that section of black smoke pipe in your picture? It's all wrinkled which suggests its paper thin. Or is my vision still impaired from last nights malted beverages?
coalkirk
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Harman VF3000
Coal Size/Type: antrhcite/rice coal

Re: So I started my hearth area demo

PostBy: echos67 On: Mon Dec 24, 2012 10:26 am

Glad to see I'm not the only one working on a hearth, what's the old saying "misery loves company" :lol:

It may be the pictures but since you said it was originally the outside wall isn't it just the band board that's bad ?
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: So I started my hearth area demo

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Mon Dec 24, 2012 10:57 am

echos67 wrote:Glad to see I'm not the only one working on a hearth, what's the old saying "misery loves company" :lol:

It may be the pictures but since you said it was originally the outside wall isn't it just the band board that's bad ?


It's a rather large beam but I did some digging up under there and it looks like another beam is a few inches behind it . Maybe the previous owner did the fix.

Haha Keith! Actually see your progress and the wife irritating me I decided to stay up all night and work . I'll have questions for you in sure since you have already been through a lot of this
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Nut / Anthracite

Re: So I started my hearth area demo

PostBy: joeq On: Mon Dec 24, 2012 11:50 am

I'm assuming that wall isn't load bearing, due to the way the sub-floor is run. but it looks like some-one did some serious bracing with the sistered studs. Is there a new addition up-stairs? Is that chimney wall on a gable end? If it's a non-load bearing wall, I wouldn't replace it either. Nice looking mop boards. don't see the big stuff too much anymore. Keep us posted on your progress and good luck with it.
joeq
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Surdiac Gotha 513
Stove/Furnace Make: Oil fired
Stove/Furnace Model: Thermopride

Re: So I started my hearth area demo

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:25 pm

joeq wrote:I'm assuming that wall isn't load bearing, due to the way the sub-floor is run. but it looks like some-one did some serious bracing with the sistered studs. Is there a new addition up-stairs? Is that chimney wall on a gable end? If it's a non-load bearing wall, I wouldn't replace it either. Nice looking mop boards. don't see the big stuff too much anymore. Keep us posted on your progress and good luck with it.


It was originally the outside of the house so I guess it wasn't load bearing . What you see there isn't subflooring it's the original tongue and groove flooring . I have the same stuff up stairs . The subflooring is large boards run on a diagonal over top of beams . They put oak flooring over top the old tongue and groove . There is not a new addition upstairs . It looks like in 1923 they converted the covered porch into a bathroom and kitchen which is on the other side of that wall. That small section of wall is the end of the addition but the rest of the wall is a gable end. Btw I have no idea by that pipe is for ... Maybe a washer drain pipe vent? I'm going to pick up some penatrant today . The original part of the house is around 18 century .
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Nut / Anthracite

Re: So I started my hearth area demo

PostBy: VigIIPeaBurner On: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:50 pm

Josh, it's a little hard to see but your picture seems to show little pinholes in the surface of the "rotted" part of the plate. I know you stated it was previously exposed on one side, but a lot of times in old houses you can find powder post betel damage to plates and beams. They come and go and are likely no longer there but their calling card is those little pinholes. If you poke at the surface, underneath there's usually a little cavern filled with frass that looks like powdered wood, almost talc like powder. I've seen it often in old houses and even lumber and boards that were stored outdoors in sheds and air drying stacks of rough-cut. Give it a poke and a scratch with a nail to see if anything is under the surface.
VigIIPeaBurner
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Keystoker Koker
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Casting Vigilant II 2310
Other Heating: #2 Oil Furnace

Re: So I started my hearth area demo

PostBy: joeq On: Mon Dec 24, 2012 2:04 pm

If the ridge beam of your roof is running parallel to that wall, and your roof rafters are sitting on the sill of that wall, then it would be considered load bearing. If so, you may want to get a professional opinion just to be safe. Got any construction buddies?
joeq
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Surdiac Gotha 513
Stove/Furnace Make: Oil fired
Stove/Furnace Model: Thermopride

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