Picked up a 1928 Oakland #6 Baseheater! Heres my plan

Re: Picked up a 1928 Oakland #6 Baseheater! Heres my plan

PostBy: franco b On: Sun Jan 06, 2013 10:34 pm

ez2remember wrote:This machine really is purrrty! I am not sure how many BTU's this can put out, but I hope its 90k+ I really couldn't get any sort of figures from my research.

What you really should be interested in is what SteveZee calls the sweet spot which is that rate of burning which does not overheat the stove and makes tending easy. My guess is that would be about 50 to 60 pounds a day for an output of about 25,000 to 30,000 BTU per hour using 12,000 net BTU per pound. Pushing the stove a bit could most likely double those figures.

Steve or William could give you a better idea of what the stove burns when pushed. From that you can get a pretty good idea of output in BTU. Just forget the fantasy figures that manufacturers put on their stoves.

Your present heating system and what it averages in fuel consumed per day should tell you what your house needs.

Congratulations on a beautiful stove and one which is at the top of its class.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Picked up a 1928 Oakland #6 Baseheater! Heres my plan

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Sun Jan 06, 2013 10:35 pm

joeq wrote:Hey lightning, were'ld you find those sloppy little guys? Don't tell me this site carries them all the time! never even looked. Good find, and point taken.


Click quote and remember the code that comes up for them if you don't find them on the list ;)

Lightning wrote:
joeq wrote:Steve, if there was an "emoticon" for drooling, I'ld put about 10 of them up.

:drool: :drool: :drool:
They only let you use 5 in one message....


:drool:
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Anthracite Nut

Re: Picked up a 1928 Oakland #6 Baseheater! Heres my plan

PostBy: Lightning On: Sun Jan 06, 2013 11:23 pm

joeq wrote:Hey lightning, were'ld you find those sloppy little guys? Don't tell me this site carries them all the time! never even looked. Good find, and point taken.


When I write a post, there is a link under the Smilies
"View more smilies"

http://nepacrossroads.com/posting.php?mode=smilies&f=55
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Stove Size Mix

Visit Hitzer Stoves

Re: Picked up a 1928 Oakland #6 Baseheater! Heres my plan

PostBy: ez2remember On: Sun Jan 06, 2013 11:39 pm

Thanks for the compliments guys. This is my first coal stove and Im nervous about the functionality of it. I know it should do pretty well, but I justified the investment to myself and my wife by thinking that the heat output will heat the whole house without the use of my primary heat (oil burner). Im just nervous is all. Can't wait to see how she does.
-Steve
ez2remember
 

Re: Picked up a 1928 Oakland #6 Baseheater! Heres my plan

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Sun Jan 06, 2013 11:48 pm

ez2remember wrote:Thanks for the compliments guys. This is my first coal stove and Im nervous about the functionality of it. I know it should do pretty well, but I justified the investment to myself and my wife by thinking that the heat output will heat the whole house without the use of my primary heat (oil burner). Im just nervous is all. Can't wait to see how she does.
-Steve



If I can heat my house with a warm morning 414a (40lbs coal stove) direct draft , then that heater will Definatly heat your house! :)

Have you watched Williams YouTube videos on the Glenwood baseheater .
http://youtu.be/mWL5DuMWw4U
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Anthracite Nut

Re: Picked up a 1928 Oakland #6 Baseheater! Heres my plan

PostBy: ez2remember On: Sun Jan 06, 2013 11:57 pm

Smokeyja wrote:
ez2remember wrote:Thanks for the compliments guys. This is my first coal stove and Im nervous about the functionality of it. I know it should do pretty well, but I justified the investment to myself and my wife by thinking that the heat output will heat the whole house without the use of my primary heat (oil burner). Im just nervous is all. Can't wait to see how she does.
-Steve



If I can heat my house with a warm morning 414a (40lbs coal stove) direct draft , then that heater will Definatly heat your house! :)

Have you watched Williams YouTube videos on the Glenwood baseheater .
http://youtu.be/mWL5DuMWw4U



I have seen those videos and that is partially the reason I got mine.
ez2remember
 

Re: Picked up a 1928 Oakland #6 Baseheater! Heres my plan

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Mon Jan 07, 2013 12:11 am

franco b wrote:
ez2remember wrote:This machine really is purrrty! I am not sure how many BTU's this can put out, but I hope its 90k+ I really couldn't get any sort of figures from my research.

What you really should be interested in is what SteveZee calls the sweet spot which is that rate of burning which does not overheat the stove and makes tending easy. My guess is that would be about 50 to 60 pounds a day for an output of about 25,000 to 30,000 BTU per hour using 12,000 net BTU per pound. Pushing the stove a bit could most likely double those figures.

Steve or William could give you a better idea of what the stove burns when pushed. From that you can get a pretty good idea of output in BTU. Just forget the fantasy figures that manufacturers put on their stoves.

Your present heating system and what it averages in fuel consumed per day should tell you what your house needs.

Congratulations on a beautiful stove and one which is at the top of its class.



It has to be way more than that because of the efficiency of that stove. If my kerosene heater puts out 22,600 btu/hr and my WM I believe puts out 40,000btu/hr then that base heater should put out more... But I could be wrong . That stove will transfer those BTUs a lot more efficiently though and the area being heated wil hold the heat for longer .
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Anthracite Nut

Re: Picked up a 1928 Oakland #6 Baseheater! Heres my plan

PostBy: wsherrick On: Mon Jan 07, 2013 3:50 am

Congratulations on a magnificent stove. Put all of your worries aside. This stove will do nothing except amaze you once you learn how to operate it. You have made two correct choices, 1. is to burn coal, 2. is to get a base heater. You now own one of the most advanced, efficient coal heaters ever made.
And you also have all of us here to help you with any questions you may have. Don't forget to show us plenty of pictures and keep us informed as you progress along.
Oh, I almost forgot. You don't need a barometric damper, in fact it may hamper the performance of your stove.

You can operate these stoves safely to around 600 degrees as a constant. Since I have the other small base heater upstairs I never need to run the No 6 above 400 or so. If I didn't use the small stove I would operate the big stove up around 500. My stove likes to run around 450. A 50 pound load of coal at that temperature will last a whole day.
The thing is every house and every chimney is different. Your set up will have its own unique characteristics.
Coal burning is learned only one way, by actually doing it. Again don't worry we've got you covered.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Picked up a 1928 Oakland #6 Baseheater! Heres my plan

PostBy: SteveZee On: Mon Jan 07, 2013 6:51 am

ez2remember wrote:Thanks for the compliments guys. This is my first coal stove and Im nervous about the functionality of it. I know it should do pretty well, but I justified the investment to myself and my wife by thinking that the heat output will heat the whole house without the use of my primary heat (oil burner). Im just nervous is all. Can't wait to see how she does.
-Steve

This depends on where the stove is located and how big your house is, plus getting the heat circulated. Your description of hook up sounds like allot of pipe before getting to the chimney? Can you explain this a little better or a drawing?
Thus far this winter, I have not used my oil burner at all. Due to the layout of my house and it's size, I use two stoves. Both Glenwoods, a heater and cookstove.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: Picked up a 1928 Oakland #6 Baseheater! Heres my plan

PostBy: franco b On: Mon Jan 07, 2013 2:40 pm

Smokeyja wrote:It has to be way more than that because of the efficiency of that stove. If my kerosene heater puts out 22,600 btu/hr and my WM I believe puts out 40,000btu/hr then that base heater should put out more... But I could be wrong . That stove will transfer those BTUs a lot more efficiently though and the area being heated wil hold the heat for longer .

No stove can put out more heat than the BTU content of the fuel it burns. Knowing the pounds of coal burned and its BTU content minus a percentage for heat lost up the chimney and unburned gasses a pretty close approximation can be made of net output.

For your Warm Morning to put out 40,000 BTU you would have to burn about 92
pounds of coal a day. Probably more.

Kerosene heater makers were also guilty of inflating output. This was proven when Consumer Reports tested them. Your heater would have to burn about 4 gallons in 24 hours to have that output if it was 100 percent efficient, which it is not.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Picked up a 1928 Oakland #6 Baseheater! Heres my plan

PostBy: ez2remember On: Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:38 pm

wsherrick wrote:Congratulations on a magnificent stove. Put all of your worries aside. This stove will do nothing except amaze you once you learn how to operate it. You have made two correct choices, 1. is to burn coal, 2. is to get a base heater. You now own one of the most advanced, efficient coal heaters ever made.
And you also have all of us here to help you with any questions you may have. Don't forget to show us plenty of pictures and keep us informed as you progress along.
Oh, I almost forgot. You don't need a barometric damper, in fact it may hamper the performance of your stove.

You can operate these stoves safely to around 600 degrees as a constant. Since I have the other small base heater upstairs I never need to run the No 6 above 400 or so. If I didn't use the small stove I would operate the big stove up around 500. My stove likes to run around 450. A 50 pound load of coal at that temperature will last a whole day.
The thing is every house and every chimney is different. Your set up will have its own unique characteristics.
Coal burning is learned only one way, by actually doing it. Again don't worry we've got you covered.


I will scrap the Baro then. Should the damper on the elbow be closed mostly then?

Thanks and once it is up and running I will definately post a few pics. William, would you mind giving me some details about your stove pipe and chimney? It's a through wall right? Are there any critical dimensions for chimney and stove pipe installs that I need to know about? (Ie- does the vertical stove pipe coming off the stove need to be a certain length, or does the horizontal pipe that penetrates the wall have to have an upward angle, or could it be level?)
Thanks again for all the advice
-Steve
ez2remember
 

Re: Picked up a 1928 Oakland #6 Baseheater! Heres my plan

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Mon Jan 07, 2013 6:58 pm

franco b wrote:
Smokeyja wrote:It has to be way more than that because of the efficiency of that stove. If my kerosene heater puts out 22,600 btu/hr and my WM I believe puts out 40,000btu/hr then that base heater should put out more... But I could be wrong . That stove will transfer those BTUs a lot more efficiently though and the area being heated wil hold the heat for longer .

No stove can put out more heat than the BTU content of the fuel it burns. Knowing the pounds of coal burned and its BTU content minus a percentage for heat lost up the chimney and unburned gasses a pretty close approximation can be made of net output.

For your Warm Morning to put out 40,000 BTU you would have to burn about 92
pounds of coal a day. Probably more.

Kerosene heater makers were also guilty of inflating output. This was proven when Consumer Reports tested them. Your heater would have to burn about 4 gallons in 24 hours to have that output if it was 100 percent efficient, which it is not.


So the blaschak anthracite is 13,000btu/lbs and the bituminous I burn is 13,131btu/lbs

Im easily burning 40lbs in a day so I'm burning up close to 520,000btus of course some is lost out the house and Its give or take.

I don't know what the efficiency rating is for a WM but it would be interesting to figure out wha it really can be approximately rated for.

So just guessing here but I could divide the 520,000 by 24 (and I'm widely estimating here ) and get about 21,666/hr and then calculate the heat loss and that would be a more realistic range right?

Now the kerosene heater loses no heat up a chimney so the 22,600btu /hr seems to be correct for the size heater it is.

Of course these are guesses and originally when I posted why I posted I was thinking of it in a whole different way! This brings it much more into prospective.

That kerosene heater holds 1.8 gallons and on low can burn an easy 16 hours without refill . But anyways I know there is a lot more to it than these simple numbers. But I will save all that for another thread. This has struck my interest.
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Anthracite Nut

Re: Picked up a 1928 Oakland #6 Baseheater! Heres my plan

PostBy: franco b On: Mon Jan 07, 2013 7:42 pm

Smokeyja wrote:So the blaschak anthracite is 13,000btu/lbs and the bituminous I burn is 13,131btu/lbs

Im easily burning 40lbs in a day so I'm burning up close to 520,000btus of course some is lost out the house and Its give or take.

I don't know what the efficiency rating is for a WM but it would be interesting to figure out wha it really can be approximately rated for.

So just guessing here but I could divide the 520,000 by 24 (and I'm widely estimating here ) and get about 21,666/hr and then calculate the heat loss and that would be a more realistic range right?

Your Warm Morning is probably about 80 percent efficient so you would have to subtract 20 percent from your figure to get the net output figure. More like 17,000 BTU. The losses come from unabsorbed heat plus unburned gasses both initial volitiles and carbon monoxide.

Part of the reason the base heaters we are discussing are more efficient is the round lined fire pot. Gasses rise in a cylinder in a spiral pattern. The round fire box sets up a vortex pattern for the air that mixes it more evenly through the fire pot lessening the formation of CO. The inverted funnel design should also increase the velocity of the air at the bottom in the burning zone and gradually lose velocity as it travel upward into a wider zone which helps to burn initial volatiles.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Picked up a 1928 Oakland #6 Baseheater! Heres my plan

PostBy: echos67 On: Mon Jan 07, 2013 7:46 pm

Very nice Richard, never thought of the round fire pots having that effect but I can visualize it from your description.
echos67
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood No. 6.

Re: Picked up a 1928 Oakland #6 Baseheater! Heres my plan

PostBy: franco b On: Mon Jan 07, 2013 8:03 pm

echos67 wrote:Very nice Richard, never thought of the round fire pots having that effect but I can visualize it from your description.

You can see that vortex pattern when re loading and have a brisk fire. The flames go clockwise looked at from above.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Visit Hitzer Stoves