Baler rebuild

Baler rebuild

PostBy: wilder11354 On: Sun Jan 06, 2013 3:45 pm

officially started today. Took advantage of warm weather,35*, took off the feeder pickup assembly. All tines are worn out, need a few berings for mainshaft, and tine bar follower cam bearings. Order parts, sand blast,paint, then reassemble assembly and set aside , then feeder screw will be gone be thru and rebuilt. Got to hurry spring is coming.
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wilder11354
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Harman SF260
Coal Size/Type: nut or pea, anthracite
Other Heating: crown oil boiler, backup.if needed

Re: Baler rebuild

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Sun Jan 06, 2013 4:22 pm

wilder11354 wrote:officially started today. Took advantage of warm weather,35*, took off the feeder pickup assembly. All tines are worn out, need a few berings for mainshaft, and tine bar follower cam bearings. Order parts, sand blast,paint, then reassemble assembly and set aside , then feeder screw will be gone be thru and rebuilt. Got to hurry spring is coming.
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You've got a project ahead of you there but I'd you keep at it you will get it done by spring ... Just dont sit down by the coal stove because that's when it gets hard to do any work ;)
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Nut / Anthracite

Re: Baler rebuild

PostBy: freetown fred On: Sun Jan 06, 2013 5:57 pm

Oh yeah, you opened that can of worms---no used ones in your area??? Scrap prices are doing real good up this way. ;) BUTTTT, have fun, it'll sure help pass the winter.
freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut/Stove mix


Re: Baler rebuild

PostBy: waldo lemieux On: Sun Jan 06, 2013 8:45 pm

Find out from the previous owner if the knotter worked and if it did dont get within a foot of the damn thing. I did this project and figured Id clean the parts of the knotter :cry2: :doh: :bang: it took me about a week on the phone with farmers to find someone that could put poor Humptey Dumpty together again and he died.


Best luck
waldo
waldo lemieux
 
Stove/Furnace Make: efm
Stove/Furnace Model: s-20

Re: Baler rebuild

PostBy: freetown fred On: Sun Jan 06, 2013 9:31 pm

real good point w l----I messed w/ one ONCE---never again :mad:
freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut/Stove mix

Re: Baler rebuild

PostBy: wilder11354 On: Mon Jan 07, 2013 8:01 pm

Not worried about knotters, at the present. They're not all that bad to get adjusted. Biggest thing is wiper on birdsfoot, rest is worm gears drives, twine plates timing to needle location while passing thru knotter frame that you can adust easily enough. Definitely won't use poly twine, its too finiky. Sisal is a bit larger in diamter(bulk) and is best for wiper arm to slide over foot, and cut.
This is in good shape, just needs its 20 year tune up.
wilder11354
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Harman SF260
Coal Size/Type: nut or pea, anthracite
Other Heating: crown oil boiler, backup.if needed

Re: Baler rebuild

PostBy: mikey55 On: Tue Jan 08, 2013 9:06 am

Hey Wilder what model ? 336? We have a 24t Deere and new holland 68 super that we use for our beef/pork operation. Better known as Triple H Acres. You know Homer, Homer and Homer. I am Homer by they way lol. Bought both balers for less than 1500.00 baled with both the day we brought them home. New Holland is down right now. Have to work on knotters. May sell that this year we just bought a old New Holland round baler. Never seen one like this instead of belts it has chains with metal bars to make the bale. Works for us. One of those barn finds. Just had some bacon from the farm. mmmm thats what makes it worth it. Nothing like home grown, hormone free meat.
mikey55
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: key stoker ka6
Stove/Furnace Model: ka6

Re: Baler rebuild

PostBy: wilder11354 On: Tue Jan 08, 2013 7:41 pm

mikey55 wrote:Hey Wilder what model ? 336? We have a 24t Deere and new holland 68 super that we use for our beef/pork operation. Better known as Triple H Acres. You know Homer, Homer and Homer. I am Homer by they way lol. Bought both balers for less than 1500.00 baled with both the day we brought them home. New Holland is down right now. Have to work on knotters. May sell that this year we just bought a old New Holland round baler. Never seen one like this instead of belts it has chains with metal bars to make the bale. Works for us. One of those barn finds. Just had some bacon from the farm. mmmm thats what makes it worth it. Nothing like home grown, hormone free meat.



Homer... easy enough to remember. Yea its a 336 with pan kicker setup. this is last piece that needs a good going over to get years of worry free service. My intention is to get beefers for own consumption(sell possibly) to start, see how it goes. fences for pastures are in place, but need some mending, gates relocated, and side building on barn worked on for winter shelter. this year will be fence year, and set some sonic tube in side building for new roof supports of exsisting structure. Lot of work, but want food, barter if this country does go to crap in future.
wilder11354
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Harman SF260
Coal Size/Type: nut or pea, anthracite
Other Heating: crown oil boiler, backup.if needed

Re: Baler rebuild

PostBy: NoSmoke On: Tue Jan 08, 2013 7:54 pm

That is quite the baler project, but it is nice to see someone get the older equipment working again.

We had a kid start off in Dairy Farming a few years ago and broke the PTO shaft on his mower. Cost for a replacement was $2700 and his wife and him had 3 kids and she was about to lamb out her fourth any day; needless to say, he had very little money. So he heard we had one sitting on the rock wall and came up to see if he could get the PTO shaft out of it. Ours was fine and since we were mowing with a bigger mower, he went home with it...

This year was our year to be up against it. Everything had broke, corn needed to be chopped and we had no tractor to haul the trucks through the mud that Sandy Storm had brought. This kid hears of our trouble and offers his tractor, a 200 hp Magnum and while it is too small to lug trucks through the mud, it had a blade that could knock down the silage so that the tractor that typically does that job, could be used to pull trucks instead. That worked so he really helped us out.

All in all...no money exchanged hands and both farms are putting milk on the national food chain. That is just what it takes today to farm. If you can help any farm out today, you really should because you never know when they are going to be able to help you out.
NoSmoke
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: New Yoker WC90
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vogelzang Pot Bellied Stove
Coal Size/Type: Stove/Nut/Pea Anthracite
Other Heating: Munchkin LP Boiler (Back-up)

Re: Baler rebuild

PostBy: NoSmoke On: Tue Jan 08, 2013 8:01 pm

A few years ago we had the Amish move in here and they had a lot to learn about farming in Maine and Maine farmers...

They borrowed this old farmers tractor to get their hay in during a rare October day of haying weather. As they came down a hill, something let go in the transmission and the tractor went down the hill, busted through a rock wall, ran out into a swamp and hit a tree and literally broke in half.

So the Amish went home, put on their Sunday best and getting multiple Amish as witnesses, went to the farmers house and told him what happened. They said, "as we speak, we are getting teams of horses together to pull the tractor out of the mud and just as soon as we get the parts, we will get that tractor fixed for you."

The old farmer shakes his head and says, "If I was you, I would borrow my other tractor and get your haying done while you can. That tractor is not going anywhere, we got all winter to fix it."

The Amish said right then that they knew they had moved into a good place to farm.
NoSmoke
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: New Yoker WC90
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vogelzang Pot Bellied Stove
Coal Size/Type: Stove/Nut/Pea Anthracite
Other Heating: Munchkin LP Boiler (Back-up)

Re: Baler rebuild

PostBy: wilder11354 On: Wed Jan 09, 2013 12:10 am

Nosmoke... i don't have money enough to buy, top of the line...used(?) machinery. So i ask around, look around at what i can find, Got a decent mower(CIH8340)for $800 put same amount back into it going thru it fixing all that it needed. Market has these in the 3-5K range used. It works perfect. Again someones run it till it breaks, and park it attitude was my fortunate find. As my friend(old farmer/mentor) down the road says to me about restarting this farm" do what you do the best you can, don't bite off too much to start, and grow when what you have is working right".
wilder11354
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Harman SF260
Coal Size/Type: nut or pea, anthracite
Other Heating: crown oil boiler, backup.if needed

Re: Baler rebuild

PostBy: mikey55 On: Wed Jan 09, 2013 9:36 am

Nsmoke, great stories, bartering at its best. Wilder your plans sound just like ours. We are just a few years ahead of you. We started with 1 bred sow to have piglets. Just to split 3 ways. We now have 3 sows, 1 boar, 11 beefers (just sent 3 that we sold). Beefers are varying age. 3 bred 2 ready to go to the butcher 1-20-13.Three bred the rest yearlings. Not sure about the breeding and calveing. We will see. Its hard to be around enough all three of us H's have full time jobs that are far more than 40 hours a week. I say good luck and go for it. You will be glad when you grill that first steak I promise. Quick note on selling it. I was out at dinner last night and a lady comes up to me and says are you the one my son got the beef from? I told her yes I was. She said it was great even the hamburg has flavor now. It feels good to hear your work pays off. That being said I hope your not looking to get rich doing this. Really about all we get is a feezer full of free meat. Which I love.
mikey55
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: key stoker ka6
Stove/Furnace Model: ka6

Re: Baler rebuild

PostBy: NoSmoke On: Wed Jan 09, 2013 7:05 pm

wilder11354 wrote:Nosmoke... i don't have money enough to buy, top of the line...used(?) machinery. So i ask around, look around at what i can find, Got a decent mower(CIH8340)for $800 put same amount back into it going thru it fixing all that it needed. Market has these in the 3-5K range used. It works perfect. Again someones run it till it breaks, and park it attitude was my fortunate find. As my friend(old farmer/mentor) down the road says to me about restarting this farm" do what you do the best you can, don't bite off too much to start, and grow when what you have is working right".


I hear you.

I get a little help from the dairy farm, but I would like to wean myself off from them and start putting up my own feed. It won't be hay for me though...too much equipment and work. I am feeding hay this year (round bales) due to a three way trade, but typically I feed my sheep silage. I think they do better on hay, but it is so much work compared to silage...just fire up the tractor and do everything from the seat!

Like you guys, I took over the family Farm in 2008 and decided that if we were going to continue to pay the taxes on this place, we had to have some real farming income and not just letting the dairy farm have it for nothing. I thought about beef cows, but the price was low at the time and it just did not seem right. Our barn burned in 1994 and so housing was an issue with beef as well. That is when I realized since the Mayflower Days, this farm has always done well with sheep, and that we grow grass well, and sheep are very hardy and don't require much for barns. I spent 10 months making a farm plan, then in late 2008 I bought some sheep.

It has not always been easy...I have lost a lot of sheep since 2008 due to a variety of issues, but always learned from it, kept my flock growing and do okay. I guess it depends how you look at it. I see lots of improvements since 2008; a new access road, fencing, manure pits and lots of land clearing. I have cleared 12 acres of forest so far and put it back into active farm land, and really like where this farm is headed right now. It is a lot of work, but I will never be without sheep.

BTW: I am looking at what you are doing now, but on the hunt for a cheap flail chopper.
NoSmoke
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: New Yoker WC90
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vogelzang Pot Bellied Stove
Coal Size/Type: Stove/Nut/Pea Anthracite
Other Heating: Munchkin LP Boiler (Back-up)

Re: Baler rebuild

PostBy: wilder11354 On: Wed Jan 09, 2013 9:13 pm

NoSmoke... been thinkin about sorghum, and a pit to store it in(silage). Yes would need a chopper and wagon for harvesting it and off loading. It would be good feed in winter for beefers, along with quality hay. I think. also theres other fields right next to me(60-80A) not used, i thought about doing a lease arrangement on for corn, or other type hays/grains to silage and /or bale. All thoughts right now till fields/pastures /barn are ready for animals, then i will look at options as needed.
i work full time now, but if i go full active with livestock, would work P/T. fluctuate hours depending on seasons, feeding schedules, etc. Plus i think i can get work for myself doing repairs to other peoples machinery. Thats all i've done is mechanics work, aviation technician, auto technician. not the best at everything but damn good at anything that is a mechanical.
wilder11354
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Harman SF260
Coal Size/Type: nut or pea, anthracite
Other Heating: crown oil boiler, backup.if needed

Re: Baler rebuild

PostBy: NoSmoke On: Thu Jan 10, 2013 7:13 am

Kind of the same story with me. I am a welder/machinist by trade and work at a Shipyard building US Navy Destroyers on third shift, then farm all day. Once in awhile I sleep, but thankfully this year I got laid off, and while I expect to go back to work any day, I got a lot of things done over the last 6 months. My plan is to get my fields in order which I am very close to completing, then build a nice barn for winter lambing and finally bring in a lot of sheep. But there is no sense in having sheep if they have no place to lamb and no feed for them to eat.

Part of the problem for me was getting around my years of dairy farming experience. With dairy cows everything is high tech, and heavy cash flow since you get a nice check every two weeks, but with sheep (and beef cows) it does not work that way. Keeping things low tech and working with one or two sales a year means you must have a SHARP pencil.I spent a lot of time on my Farm Plan, and while I got slack for it, it really has paid off. It seems as if every time I get away from my plan, things go bad. Like fencing, cheap fencing for sheep just does not work.

I plan to go silage but am not sure which way will work best. Equipment wise, a flail chopper and wagon will work to put my feed up, but some claim the long cut will not pack good in the horizontal silo, while others say it will. I tend to be a minimalist on everything so the idea of one machine getting my feed for the year is appealing.

My only suggestion to you is to KEEP GOOD RECORDS! When you go for your farm grants and farm loans, they require good record keeping and if it is in place, really helps smooth the path for fiscal help. I have done pretty well with some grants and some low interest loans which has really helped my farm produce well these last 5 years.
NoSmoke
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: New Yoker WC90
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vogelzang Pot Bellied Stove
Coal Size/Type: Stove/Nut/Pea Anthracite
Other Heating: Munchkin LP Boiler (Back-up)