Leaking underground

Re: Leaking underground

PostBy: waldo lemieux On: Mon Mar 11, 2013 8:23 pm

if your moving your boiler like Rob suggested , dont worry about it . If your leaving alone then you need to dig the thing up , This time make sure there is a place for water to drain from the ditch. It kinda looks like there is a little bit of grade to the side of the trench, dig a few laterals off the ditch to daylight . Next figure out what you want for pipe and insulation . Finally , fill the trench to 6" over the pipe with #2 washed stone(round golfball size) not sand or dirt. the stone will have air pockets which will keep the ground from stealing your heat. Wet sand or earth around your pipe is'nt any better than water. no water, no worries :)
Im shure it hurts but, you'll just have to burn coal a little longer to offset the cost. And if your gonna use a conduit it needs to be watertight till your above grade and Id still use the stone for fill.

waldo
waldo lemieux
 
Stove/Furnace Make: efm
Stove/Furnace Model: s-20

Re: Leaking underground

PostBy: katman On: Fri Mar 29, 2013 8:15 am

Just looked at your picture. You said you went pretty deep with your pipe so you have a lot of heat loss to melt the snow like that. It is expensive, but I used 1 1/4 inch thermapex for my line. Ran about 100 feet between the barn and the house. Sandy soil (like masonry sand) and only about 30 inches down in some spots. Absolutely no snow melt. My IR gun is a cheapo but shows little or no loss at the transition to copper when measured at house entry and barn exit points. I also have heat pumps at the house to use when I'm not home or in Spring and Fall. Harman boiler and electric water heater. If I had the option to locate in the house I would consider either one of the Harman (or other brand) furnaces and electric hot water heater or the boiler with DHW coil and air duct heat exchanger. The new, high efficiency hot water heaters are pretty thrifty and I don't have to worry about keeping a fire going during the summer when I'd rather be fishing and we have to deal with power outages caused by thunderstorms.
katman
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman Magnum
Other Heating: Harman PB 105 Pellet Boiler

Re: Leaking underground

PostBy: Lightning On: Sun Jun 30, 2013 9:34 am

Scottscoaled wrote:This is what I'm talking about. Major usage problems. :(



Hi partner, I was reviewing old threads and wondered what you did for this?
Did you replace the run between the house and boiler??
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash


Re: Leaking underground

PostBy: Scottscoaled On: Mon Jul 01, 2013 8:10 pm

No, I have been suffering along. Getting ready to move a boiler into the basement. Plan to have it ready before September.
Scottscoaled
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM 520x4, 350, 700. Van Wert 400 x 2, 800, 1200.
Coal Size/Type: Lots of buck

Re: Leaking underground

PostBy: Lightning On: Mon Jul 01, 2013 8:23 pm

Ah now yer talking :-) excellent plan!!
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash

Re: Leaking underground

PostBy: waldo lemieux On: Tue Jul 02, 2013 11:52 am

SC
Dont put it in the basement just because you dont think its possible to do without losing heat, it is posible. If its because of ease of use or almost any other reason its probably the right thing....

Waldo
waldo lemieux
 
Stove/Furnace Make: efm
Stove/Furnace Model: s-20

Re: Leaking underground

PostBy: Rob R. On: Tue Jul 02, 2013 6:10 pm

You can minimize heat loss to the ground and outbuilding, but you can't eliminate it. The cost of running additional circulator(s) should also be considered. If circumstances permit, a basement installation is usually the most economical on day 1 and in the long term.

I expect Scott will be grinning when he has warm floors and burns 20% less coal.
Rob R.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Coal Size/Type: Rice/buck
Other Heating: Dad's 1953 EFM Highboy

Re: Leaking underground

PostBy: Scottscoaled On: Tue Jul 02, 2013 10:30 pm

The issue that worries me the most is the additional heat in the basement during the dog days of summer. I use it for domestic all summer.
Scottscoaled
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM 520x4, 350, 700. Van Wert 400 x 2, 800, 1200.
Coal Size/Type: Lots of buck

Re: Leaking underground

PostBy: whistlenut On: Tue Jul 02, 2013 11:03 pm

The additional heat off the boiler can be an issue, however you will not need a dehumidifier anymore. Many of us who have experienced 24/7-365 for a few years have learned to love the dry basement condition. If your 'Man-Cave' is in the basement, most attendees will be in their skivvies, so you will have to adjust to that. It could make the Bellows Fall trips a thing of the past. I see that as a win, win, win!!! Even the gerbil cage will be warm!!!! :idea: :!: :eek2: :woot: :notsure:
whistlenut
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AA130's,260's, AHS130&260's,EFM900,GJ&VanWert
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Franks Boiler,Itasca415,NYer130,Van Wert
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Yellow Flame
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska-4,Keystoker-2,
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Alaska,Gibraltor,Keystone,Vc Vigilant 2
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Van Wert, NYer's, Ford,Jensen.
Coal Size/Type: Rice,Buck,Pea,Nut&Stove
Other Heating: Oil HWBB

Re: Leaking underground

PostBy: Rob R. On: Wed Jul 03, 2013 5:40 am

Scottscoaled wrote:The issue that worries me the most is the additional heat in the basement during the dog days of summer. I use it for domestic all summer.


Insulate the boiler and piping well, and don't run the boiler any warmer than necessary to keep up with your indirect water heater. My EFM stays at 140-150 degrees, and the basement is low to mid 70's.
Rob R.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Coal Size/Type: Rice/buck
Other Heating: Dad's 1953 EFM Highboy

Re: Leaking underground

PostBy: Wiz On: Wed Jul 03, 2013 5:56 am

Rob R. wrote:
Scottscoaled wrote:The issue that worries me the most is the additional heat in the basement during the dog days of summer. I use it for domestic all summer.


Insulate the boiler and piping well, and don't run the boiler any warmer than necessary to keep up with your indirect water heater. My EFM stays at 140-150 degrees, and the basement is low to mid 70's.


I did exactly what Rob is saying and my work shop temp has drop greatly. Rob as you mention about keystoker top not being insulate, I've also insulated ash pan door too. ;)
Wiz
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker Ka 6
Coal Size/Type: Casey Junk Coal :(

Re: Leaking underground

PostBy: Rob R. On: Wed Jul 03, 2013 6:00 am

Wiz wrote: I've also insulated ash pan door too.


Very thorough. 8-)
Rob R.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Coal Size/Type: Rice/buck
Other Heating: Dad's 1953 EFM Highboy

Re: Leaking underground

PostBy: waldo lemieux On: Wed Jul 03, 2013 8:11 am

SC

I guess that I assumed that you were going to heat the building your boiler is in now. If you dont want heat out there then by all means put it in the basemoosa.If on the other hand you are going to move the thing inside and then run heat back out to you current location , leave it where it is and plant new pipes. The amount of heat loss to the ground can be minimized, as Rob pointed out, and in "coal dollars" becomes a pittance. To me the two Big issues are, do you want heat in the out building, and how much of an ass ache is moving coal in and ash out of your basement .

Waldo
waldo lemieux
 
Stove/Furnace Make: efm
Stove/Furnace Model: s-20

Re: Leaking underground

PostBy: Phil May On: Thu Aug 15, 2013 10:30 am

The heat off my 700 keeps the shop warm until it gets below 45 or I have the doors open. Warm enough for the shop not warm enough for the house. You would definately want to insulate the hell out of the furnace and the pipe if you put in the house.
Phil May
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM 700
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat
Stove/Furnace Make: EFM
Stove/Furnace Model: 700