My new Glenwood Oak 30 - pics attached - I need advice!

Re: My new Glenwood Oak 30 - pics attached - I need advice!

PostBy: Tim On: Fri Feb 01, 2013 3:58 pm

Marty,
your liner came out great!...you get your manual damper installed you should be good to go....I run a Baro on mine along with the manual ...but I am not gonna get in the debate of WHY on using both ...some use one or the other or both mine just works best with both but I think that the end result is based on where u live and your weather conditions... GET HER FIRED UP and let us know how she WORKS! :D
Tim
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Oak #30

Re: My new Glenwood Oak 30 - pics attached - I need advice!

PostBy: glenwoodoak On: Fri Feb 01, 2013 10:23 pm

My damper finally arrived by UPS this evening! I just started a fire with lump charcoal per William's YouTube video. The only stuff I could find was at Lowe's - Cowboy Hardwood Lump Charcoal. I didn't have Kerosene so I gave it a little lighter fluid. It's been burning now for about 20 minutes. It's been pretty sparky at times, I'm guessing that's the charcoal. I don't have an ash pan so the cleanout bin is wide open and it's sporadicly shooting sparks out the primary vents.

30 minute update: The temperature at the top of the barrel is 400 . Primary vents wide open. Second vent 1/3 open. Damper wide open and in direct draft mode. The sparking has stopped.
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glenwoodoak
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Oak 30

Re: My new Glenwood Oak 30 - pics attached - I need advice!

PostBy: glenwoodoak On: Sat Feb 02, 2013 12:28 am

2.5 hour update: I added some coal slowly over time (about a coal hod full in total), but didn't want to fill the firebox as this is my first coal fire and I don't know the ins and outs yet. I put the stove in indirect, closed the damper to 45 and kept the primaries open about 1/2 inch. The top of the barrel got up to 550. When that happened I closed the damper fully as well with all the primary and secondary vents, but it's been holding at 550-600. Is this normal? From what I've been reading it sounds like people burn in the 350-400 range. I've got everything shut tight and it's not dropping over the last 30+ minutes.
glenwoodoak
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Oak 30

Visit Hitzer Stoves

Re: My new Glenwood Oak 30 - pics attached - I need advice!

PostBy: wsherrick On: Sat Feb 02, 2013 4:30 am

glenwoodoak wrote:2.5 hour update: I added some coal slowly over time (about a coal hod full in total), but didn't want to fill the firebox as this is my first coal fire and I don't know the ins and outs yet. I put the stove in indirect, closed the damper to 45 and kept the primaries open about 1/2 inch. The top of the barrel got up to 550. When that happened I closed the damper fully as well with all the primary and secondary vents, but it's been holding at 550-600. Is this normal? From what I've been reading it sounds like people burn in the 350-400 range. I've got everything shut tight and it's not dropping over the last 30+ minutes.


Don't worry these stoves are fine at 600 degrees. You need another thermometer for the stove pipe. Put it about two feet up from the top of the stove. When you do that then you can monitor efficiency the more difference between the one on the stove and the one on the stove pipe gives you how well your stove is running.
You have a lot to learn.
Be patient and remember we are always here to help you as you learn.
wsherrick
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: None
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: None
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: None
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: My new Glenwood Oak 30 - pics attached - I need advice!

PostBy: glenwoodoak On: Sat Feb 02, 2013 8:40 am

wsherrick wrote:
glenwoodoak wrote:2.5 hour update: I added some coal slowly over time (about a coal hod full in total), but didn't want to fill the firebox as this is my first coal fire and I don't know the ins and outs yet. I put the stove in indirect, closed the damper to 45 and kept the primaries open about 1/2 inch. The top of the barrel got up to 550. When that happened I closed the damper fully as well with all the primary and secondary vents, but it's been holding at 550-600. Is this normal? From what I've been reading it sounds like people burn in the 350-400 range. I've got everything shut tight and it's not dropping over the last 30+ minutes.


Don't worry these stoves are fine at 600 degrees. You need another thermometer for the stove pipe. Put it about two feet up from the top of the stove. When you do that then you can monitor efficiency the more difference between the one on the stove and the one on the stove pipe gives you how well your stove is running.
You have a lot to learn.
Be patient and remember we are always here to help you as you learn.



Thank you William. Shouldn't I be able to damper it down so the temperature is 300 on the barrel? I didn't want to add more than a few inches of coal because I was afraid it would keep going up and I wouldn't be able to control it. I have double wall pipe coming out of the stove then it T's into class a so a thermometer wouldn't get an accurate reading. I couldn't touch the double wall and even the class a was hot. I guess it's possible my thermometer is off. It's reading 100 now and the stove is cold, but they may all be like that? I'll check one at the hardware store and see.

I could also hear the air being pulled through the stove pipe (I believe) when it was stuck at 550-600.

Do you think I have an air leak somewhere? When I would burn bio bricks it would go really high too until I blocked the ashpan with a solid piece of steel I fabricated in the shape of a wood burning plate. I looked a little last night for cracks but it was so hot I couldn't stay close. I just looked now and don't see any stress cracks.

There's a 1/8 inch gap seam where the collar on the backpipe slides into the collar on the stove barrel (picture attached). Should I cement there? Are there any spots which should get cement? I've done the areas around the collars, but that's it.

Here's the damper I installed (picture attached). I noticed the damper wasn't really centered, but maybe that's normal?

My primary vents look tight (picture attached).

I'm definintely missing something. I'm going to hold off on the second fire until I hear from the forum...

Thanks again
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glenwoodoak
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Oak 30

Re: My new Glenwood Oak 30 - pics attached - I need advice!

PostBy: SteveZee On: Sat Feb 02, 2013 11:07 am

Marty, You are thinking like a wood burner. Coal is a different animal.

Once the cowboy coal is going and you have some coal in there also (I start with coal surrounding the charcoal) and you add more to say a half pot and it's lit and going well with blue flames, you then need to top it right up. It will not get hotter as you are thinking it will actually drop the stove in temp until it (the full pot) begins to ignite. Whenever my stove is hotter then I like it, I just top it up with fresh coal to "reduce" the temp and control how far I let it come back from there. I know this sounds counter intuitive but it's true! When you had 550-600 temps, if you had filled the pot right up, the temp would have dropped back to 300 or so. I would wait about 15 min then set your backpipe indirect, MPD to 45° closed and the primaries to maybe a 1/4" open and see what that gave you after an hour or two. It's always hot when you initially fire it up. When you add fresh coal it always drops the temp and you control how hot you want it from there. Hope this makes sense.
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: My new Glenwood Oak 30 - pics attached - I need advice!

PostBy: glenwoodoak On: Sat Feb 02, 2013 11:22 am

SteveZee wrote:Marty, You are thinking like a wood burner. Coal is a different animal.

Once the cowboy coal is going and you have some coal in there also (I start with coal surrounding the charcoal) and you add more to say a half pot and it's lit and going well with blue flames, you then need to top it right up. It will not get hotter as you are thinking it will actually drop the stove in temp until it (the full pot) begins to ignite. Whenever my stove is hotter then I like it, I just top it up with fresh coal to "reduce" the temp and control how far I let it come back from there. I know this sounds counter intuitive but it's true! When you had 550-600 temps, if you had filled the pot right up, the temp would have dropped back to 300 or so. I would wait about 15 min then set your backpipe indirect, MPD to 45° closed and the primaries to maybe a 1/4" open and see what that gave you after an hour or two. It's always hot when you initially fire it up. When you add fresh coal it always drops the temp and you control how hot you want it from there. Hope this makes sense.



Thanks Steve. I'll try it again. I had the ring of coal around the charcoal. Once that was going I added 4 shovel fulls. I did that a few times, but stopped when I couldn't get the temperature to drop. I only filled up maybe 1/4 of the pot.

If I have the primaries fully closed as well as the damper shouldn't I be able to choke out the fire?
glenwoodoak
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Oak 30

Re: My new Glenwood Oak 30 - pics attached - I need advice!

PostBy: franco b On: Sat Feb 02, 2013 11:30 am

glenwoodoak wrote:Shouldn't I be able to damper it down so the temperature is 300 on the barrel?

Yes you should. These stoves with the vertical round construction are very easy drafting. As a result are very sensitive to intake air adjustment, meaning it is more important than ever that the ash door fit tightly and the air adjustments as well.

Time to do the dollar bill test on that door and also open the door and shine a flashlight on the back side of the rotary air adjusters to check for leaks. If you ever have what you regard as over fire conditions you can always tame it with a shovel full of ash.

As Steve has pointed out though by adding coal it will rapidly lower temps. as the new coal absorbs heat. Add the coal in several layers and do it when you will be around to monitor the fire so you get a feel for its operation. When fully loaded the air controls should be barely open for a long burn and probably 350 to 400 degrees on the upper barrel.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: My new Glenwood Oak 30 - pics attached - I need advice!

PostBy: glenwoodoak On: Sat Feb 02, 2013 11:55 am

franco b wrote:
glenwoodoak wrote:Shouldn't I be able to damper it down so the temperature is 300 on the barrel?

Yes you should. These stoves with the vertical round construction are very easy drafting. As a result are very sensitive to intake air adjustment, meaning it is more important than ever that the ash door fit tightly and the air adjustments as well.

Time to do the dollar bill test on that door and also open the door and shine a flashlight on the back side of the rotary air adjusters to check for leaks. If you ever have what you regard as over fire conditions you can always tame it with a shovel full of ash.

As Steve has pointed out though by adding coal it will rapidly lower temps. as the new coal absorbs heat. Add the coal in several layers and do it when you will be around to monitor the fire so you get a feel for its operation. When fully loaded the air controls should be barely open for a long burn and probably 350 to 400 degrees on the upper barrel.


Hi Franco, I tried the dollar bill in the door again. On the bottom of the door I can't pull the dollar out without ripping it. I can pull it out on top and left side near the top, but it doesn't fall out or anything. If the door is closed I can work the dollar bill into the top and if I open the door the bill is slid into the shaker cover. Is that normal? By looking at is I can see the bottom definitely fits tight. 3/4 of the way up on the left side door and on the top I can start to see a very small gap. The last picture shows it best.

I didn't see any light coming out of the dampers.

I talked to Steve and I was going to try to fully load it and see if that made a difference.
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Last edited by glenwoodoak on Sat Feb 02, 2013 12:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
glenwoodoak
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Oak 30

Re: My new Glenwood Oak 30 - pics attached - I need advice!

PostBy: franco b On: Sat Feb 02, 2013 12:19 pm

It is very easy to put a strip of gasket in the top of the door where it is not tight. Be sure to check around the hinge area too. The bill should at least require some tension to pull it out. There is a type of gasket meant for wrapping around the glass doors of stoves. It is two narrow strips with a sticky backing. All you need is one of the narrow strips to stick on where needed. Any stove shop should have it. I would stick it on the stove body where the gap is.

Another way is to use Permatex high temp silicone. Put a bead on the door and then close the door with a piece of waxed paper placed on the stove body so it does not stick there. Wipe off any excess squeezed out and let set overnight. You could place the silicone just where there is a gap or around the entire door.

Will make a night and day difference in controlling the stove. The leak you have would probably work all right with the air shutters completely closed but I would prefer to seal the door perfectly. Amazing how little air is needed. I am using A Glenwood Modern
Oak 114 and had to seal the bottom of the door. Normally one air shutter open about 1/16 to 1/8 inch open. Smaller stove than yours so less air.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: My new Glenwood Oak 30 - pics attached - I need advice!

PostBy: LsFarm On: Sat Feb 02, 2013 1:05 pm

Don't neglect to seal the joint between the fire pot and the stove base or ashpan box.. just a small gap, even .010"wide, and an inch long would be enough to feed the fire if you have strong draft. I'd go all around the inside if you can, and if not around the outside of the joint with furnace cement. You can buy it in caulking tubes.
You must seal up the base and the door so that YOU control the air to the underside of the fire.. an air leak above the fire is not critical, it will
only act like a check damper and reduce the draft through the coalbed.

Greg L.
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

Re: My new Glenwood Oak 30 - pics attached - I need advice!

PostBy: glenwoodoak On: Sat Feb 02, 2013 2:50 pm

Thanks Franco and Greg, I will take a look.

I started a new fire and once it got going filled the pot to about 1.5 inches from the top. It's been about 40 minutes since I filled it and the temp has creeped up to 600. The damper and the primaries have been shut completely since I filled it. I can't get it any lower so I'm guessing I definitely have an air leak?

I'll check into caulking the inside of the ash door tomorrow once this goes out. Are there other places I should be caulking as well? Greg, you mentioned where the firebox meets the base? Where you referring to the area I highlighted in red?
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glenwoodoak
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Oak 30

Re: My new Glenwood Oak 30 - pics attached - I need advice!

PostBy: glenwoodoak On: Sat Feb 02, 2013 2:55 pm

LsFarm wrote:Don't neglect to seal the joint between the fire pot and the stove base or ashpan box.. just a small gap, even .010"wide, and an inch long would be enough to feed the fire if you have strong draft. I'd go all around the inside if you can, and if not around the outside of the joint with furnace cement. You can buy it in caulking tubes.
You must seal up the base and the door so that YOU control the air to the underside of the fire.. an air leak above the fire is not critical, it will
only act like a check damper and reduce the draft through the coalbed.

Greg L.


Thanks Greg, I'll take a look.
glenwoodoak
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Oak 30

Re: My new Glenwood Oak 30 - pics attached - I need advice!

PostBy: LsFarm On: Sat Feb 02, 2013 4:40 pm

With your second fire going, and the chimney draft stron, take a candle or a long match, light it and rin it by the edge of your door, the flam should be scuked into the air gap by the draft inside the stove..

Yes, tha area in red, any gap UNDER the firepot. so that spot whare the firepot mates to the base, is there a 'floor' to the ashpan box or base?? is it sealed well so that air cannot get to the fire uncontroled??

take some aluminum foil, folt a couple of layers to make a ribbon about the width of a pencil, open the ashpan door, and put the flattened strip of foil along the top of the door/seal area.. close the door, see if this make-shift gasket slows the fire..

Greg L.

I'd use the candle or incense stick to check all the joints and sealed areas for leaks.

Greg
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland

Re: My new Glenwood Oak 30 - pics attached - I need advice!

PostBy: glenwoodoak On: Sat Feb 02, 2013 5:00 pm

LsFarm wrote:With your second fire going, and the chimney draft stron, take a candle or a long match, light it and rin it by the edge of your door, the flam should be scuked into the air gap by the draft inside the stove..

Yes, tha area in red, any gap UNDER the firepot. so that spot whare the firepot mates to the base, is there a 'floor' to the ashpan box or base?? is it sealed well so that air cannot get to the fire uncontroled??

take some aluminum foil, folt a couple of layers to make a ribbon about the width of a pencil, open the ashpan door, and put the flattened strip of foil along the top of the door/seal area.. close the door, see if this make-shift gasket slows the fire..

Greg L.

I'd use the candle or incense stick to check all the joints and sealed areas for leaks.

Greg



Hi Greg,

I used a candle. I didn't really get any movement on the lower part of the stove. The placed where the flame danced was where my damper pipe connected to the stove and 6 inches up where my damper connects to the stove pipe. They are on really tight, but I guess there's leakage? I guess I can seal it, but it's going to have to be anually as I'll need to take the pipe off to clean it.

I got a little movement between the two loading doors, but I assume this is normal.

Do you think it's probable the stove pipe is the primary problem? I'm going to seal every seam I can see.
glenwoodoak
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Oak 30

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