Protecting Trailer tires

Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: NWBuilder On: Wed Jan 23, 2013 10:12 am

I have 2 trailers, one that gets used with some regularity and another that sits most of the time. Does anyone have a good way of protecting the tires from sun cracks? I had one set of tires go bad and the tread was practically new. Thanks for your thoughts.
NWBuilder
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Ahs 130
Coal Size/Type: Burning Pea anthracite

Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: Dennis On: Wed Jan 23, 2013 10:27 am

try putting on tire protecting liquid and cover them with the uv resistant covers and lift them off the ground
Dennis
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: AHS/WOC55-multi-fuel/wood,oil,coal
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/stove size

Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: RAYJAY On: Wed Jan 23, 2013 10:42 am

Dennis wrote:try putting on tire protecting liquid and cover them with the uv resistant covers and lift them off the ground



like he said above, keep them clean and spray with tire protector i use the cheap silver tarps and back up on to a junk piece of plywood to keep it off of the ground ,
RAYJAY
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: VAN WERT - 600 VA HOT WATER
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: HARMAN- MAGUM STOKER
Coal Size/Type: BUCKWHEAT ON BOTH
Other Heating: NG BOILER


Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: VigIIPeaBurner On: Wed Jan 23, 2013 10:47 am

Dennis wrote:try putting on tire protecting liquid and cover them with the uv resistant covers and lift them off the ground

... supporting the trailer on jack stands or blocks so that the axles hang free of the weight of the trailer. This will help keep the springs in top shape as well. Before you cover the tires, drop the air pressure down.
VigIIPeaBurner
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Keystoker Koker
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Casting Vigilant II 2310
Other Heating: #2 Oil Furnace

Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: NWBuilder On: Wed Jan 23, 2013 10:56 am

Thanks guys, why do you drop the air pressure down?
NWBuilder
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Ahs 130
Coal Size/Type: Burning Pea anthracite

Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: VigIIPeaBurner On: Wed Jan 23, 2013 1:39 pm

NWBuilder wrote:Thanks guys, why do you drop the air pressure down?

There's a couple of reasons but mainly, I had an old boss (very smart dairy farmer, one of my lifetime mentors) that was an antique car owner and that's what he said was the right thing to do. Lower pressure puts less stress on the carcass of the tire which should keep the cords in better shape over a long period of time.

Another reason is air contains a good deal of oxygen. Oxygen can affect a rim bead contact point on the trailer tire or any tire rim. That is why nitrogen is such a popular newfangled way to fill tires. No oxygen no oxidation. I've seen it more on the aluminum alloy rims then I have steel rims but they rust just the same. On the aluminum rims you get a white powdery deposit right at the bead seal. That weak seal caused by the powder (oxidized aluminum) allows the air to leak out. All of this applies to the rubber stems too, same principles.
VigIIPeaBurner
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Keystoker Koker
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Casting Vigilant II 2310
Other Heating: #2 Oil Furnace

Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: NWBuilder On: Wed Jan 23, 2013 1:44 pm

VigIIPeaBurner wrote:
NWBuilder wrote:Thanks guys, why do you drop the air pressure down?

There's a couple of reasons but mainly, I had an old boss (very smart dairy farmer, one of my lifetime mentors) that was an antique car owner and that's what he said was the right thing to do. Lower pressure puts less stress on the carcass of the tire which should keep the cords in better shape over a long period of time.

Another reason is air contains a good deal of oxygen. Oxygen can affect a rim bead contact point on the trailer tire or any tire rim. That is why nitrogen is such a popular newfangled way to fill tires. No oxygen no oxidation. I've seen it more on the aluminum alloy rims then I have steel rims but they rust just the same. On the aluminum rims you get a white powdery deposit right at the bead seal. That weak seal caused by the powder (oxidized aluminum) allows the air to leak out. All of this applies to the rubber stems too, same principles.


Thanks, so drop it down a little or cut it in half? How much do you actually take out? Thanks.
NWBuilder
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Ahs 130
Coal Size/Type: Burning Pea anthracite

Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: VigIIPeaBurner On: Wed Jan 23, 2013 2:11 pm

I don't know if there's a rule for this other than a rule of thumb. When I've done it, I've held just south of 20 psi..

I don't know if there's much of a return from airing down if you only store for a few months. I'd imagine there's more of a return for long term storage but short term returns on tire life add up given how expensive tires have become. The fellow I learned this from had a collection of antique cars, JD and Farmall tractors. Nothing I have sits around that long.
VigIIPeaBurner
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Keystoker Koker
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Casting Vigilant II 2310
Other Heating: #2 Oil Furnace

Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: NWBuilder On: Wed Jan 23, 2013 2:49 pm

VigIIPeaBurner wrote:I don't know if there's a rule for this other than a rule of thumb. When I've done it, I've held just south of 20 psi..

I don't know if there's much of a return from airing down if you only store for a few months. I'd imagine there's more of a return for long term storage but short term returns on tire life add up given how expensive tires have become. The fellow I learned this from had a collection of antique cars, JD and Farmall tractors. Nothing I have sits around that long.


One of my trailers is a construction job trailer. It gets moved from job to job so it does move several times a year. The other is a small flat bed that gets moved maybe quarterly. Adding and subtracting air is no big deal as the compressor is right in the garage but maybe I will let the construction trailer be and just adjust the other one. Thanks for your input. Ken
NWBuilder
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Ahs 130
Coal Size/Type: Burning Pea anthracite

Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: dtzackus On: Wed Jan 23, 2013 11:59 pm

I'd becareful with the tire spray.

I have a RV, travel trailer, and I read once that those tire sprays are not the best thing for tires that just sit there such as travel trailers, campers, boats, etc... Over time it will increase tire cracks.

I bought a nice set of tire covers on Ebay and faithfully put them on all the time.
dtzackus
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Gibraltar LCC
Stove/Furnace Make: Gibraltar
Stove/Furnace Model: LCC

Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: Paulie On: Thu Jan 24, 2013 12:18 pm

I put trash bags over the wheels of trailers I have that don't get much use. I have a 10 year old travel trailer that is on a seasonal
site. I replace the bags every couple of years. Tires look new, no cracks or warping of any kind.
Paulie
 
Stove/Furnace Make: leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Pioneer

Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: SMITTY On: Thu Jan 24, 2013 12:29 pm

Yeah I steer clear of any sprays or magic in a can for tires - they end up pulling the oils out of the tire and accelerating the decay process. That's what I was told back in the day by a Dunlop rep.

I try to park the trailer as much in the shade as possible. Black trash bags are a good idea too. I don't do anything with mine as far as covers or pressure. Main thing is to keep the sun off them. Sun & heat are rubber killers. If your ever in Phoenix, check out weatherstripping on a 30 year old car. It won't be there. ;)

If it's going to be sitting a few years, then jack it up off the ground. If just for a few months, don't worry about it. Tires today have pretty strong construction inside. Takes alot to change their shape.
SMITTY
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Patriot Coal - custom built by Jim Dorsey
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III (not currently in use)
Coal Size/Type: Rice / Blaschak anthracite
Other Heating: Oil fired Burnham boiler

Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: Freddy On: Thu Jan 24, 2013 1:51 pm

This liquid crap they are putting on the roads to melt ice is hell on tires. I'd suggest washing them & keeping the sun off them. I'm not big on spray on stuff. I do use nitrogen in my tires. It's nice to only check pressure twice a year...and often not have to add!
Freddy
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 130 (pea)
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Reading piece o' junk in the barn (rice)
Coal Size/Type: Pea size, Superior, deep mined

Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: SMITTY On: Thu Jan 24, 2013 5:11 pm

I don't buy into the nitrogen hype either. It's great in that it's unaffected by temperature (same reason it's used in motorcycle suspension, namely rear shocks), but to me the extra cost to have it in a tire that's leak prone by nature is not worth it.

Just my .02 ...
SMITTY
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Patriot Coal - custom built by Jim Dorsey
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III (not currently in use)
Coal Size/Type: Rice / Blaschak anthracite
Other Heating: Oil fired Burnham boiler

Re: Protecting Trailer tires

PostBy: CoaLen On: Thu Jan 24, 2013 5:25 pm

The air we breathe and pump into our tires is 78% nitrogen. When you mount a tire it contains this same air at about 14 psi (atmospheric pressure). The "industrial nitrogen" pumped into the tire is actually 85-90% nitrogen. So I don't see how the usual nitrogen fill on our tires can make much of a difference.
I agree with Smitty, it's not worth it.
CoaLen
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Keystoker Koker
Coal Size/Type: rice