A different draft question?

A different draft question?

PostBy: Canaan coal man On: Thu Feb 07, 2013 1:55 pm

Ok I probly should have asked this earlyer in the season, but should the draft change with the different heat settings of the stove? For example I have the barro set so my draft is around .04 with the heat setting on 2. when i crank the stove to 3 for cold nights or slow it down to 1 for warm days, my draft will not stay at .04 and i will have to adjust the baro accordingly. My stove is a channing 3 top vent. I have a feald controll type m baro its about 18'' off the stove. my manometer hookup is tapped into the stove pipe right above the flue on the stove. Is this set up all right?
do you guys have to keep adjusting your baros? I hope i havent gone 3/4 of the heating season sending to much heat up the chimney!!
Thanks Brenden
Canaan coal man
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing III Top Vent

Re: A different draft question?

PostBy: I'm On Fire On: Thu Feb 07, 2013 2:03 pm

The draft will change as the outside temps warm up or cool off and when you change your temp settings.
I'm On Fire
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machines DS-1600 Hot Air Circulator

Re: A different draft question?

PostBy: Canaan coal man On: Thu Feb 07, 2013 3:41 pm

but even when i adjust the stove to burn hoter with the same out side temps my draft will rise, witch is understandable because the fire is hotter = more draft, but shouldn't the baro "self adjust" for that.
Also I know on warmer days when i turn down the stove i will get little draft .01-.02 with the baro fully closed thats not to safe is it? should i fire the stove more to hold a better draft? I havent had a co problem yet on warm days. Its nice to save coal on warm days but a little scared to have that low of a draft.
My chimny is the class A stainless and is a lttle over 12ft tall, should i add another 3ft section?
Canaan coal man
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing III Top Vent

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Re: A different draft question?

PostBy: franco b On: Thu Feb 07, 2013 4:09 pm

Canaan coal man wrote: hotter = more draft, but shouldn't the baro "self adjust"

Yes it should. It is there to prevent over draft on those days where draft is high and when you are firing hotter. If the flap is wide open and draft reading is still too high, then it is beyond the ability of the baro to correct.

Under low draft conditions all the baro can do is close the flap. It can't create draft, it can only compensate for too high draft.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
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Re: A different draft question?

PostBy: Lightning On: Thu Feb 07, 2013 9:10 pm

Canaan coal man wrote:but even when i adjust the stove to burn hoter with the same out side temps my draft will rise, witch is understandable because the fire is hotter = more draft, but shouldn't the baro "self adjust" for that.


The baro regulates to an extent.. It doesn't do a "perfect" job since the chimney is always pulling on the baro and the stove at the same time. The baro takes spikes out of the draft pressure. If you were to graph out the peaks and troughs of a chimney draft, without the baro you would see higher/sharper peaks and troughs. With the baro, the graph would be more flat and curvy with lower peaks and troughs. There is still a small variance of draft pressure.

Canaan coal man wrote:Also I know on warmer days when i turn down the stove i will get little draft .01-.02 with the baro fully closed thats not to safe is it?

Its only not safe if the chimney draft fails. As long as there is even a minute amount of negative pressure in the pipe, CO cannot escape.
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash

Re: A different draft question?

PostBy: Rigar On: Thu Feb 07, 2013 11:43 pm

Coal man...
Alot of things affect draft (measured at the breech)..
But the biggest two factors are temperature (diferential of flu gas temp and oudside temp) and chimney design.
A properly "set " baro under typical firing will actually be slightly (again-slightly) open...giving the baro the ability to close if conditions warrant- (to improve upon a poor draft)
You may actually experience better draft with a taller chimney...i would certainly consider it.
The baro will not create draft...but when properly set it will improve or help regulate it by allowing dillution air into the stack.
The adjustable weighted door works by "limiting" (for lack of a better word) the amount of pull the appliance will experience from outside influences.

The wieght determines how much negative pressure is needed to affect the damper (open to limit)
During the shoulder seasons I tend to raise mine to a higher number(slightly)...as overdrafting when its warmer out isnt the worst of problems(IMO)...
I ll take the piece of mind over the outfire do to poor draft
...hope this helps

..."Lightning" has a great way of explaing the benefits of the baro ^
Rigar
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Keystoker A 150
Coal Size/Type: anthracite rice
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Re: A different draft question?

PostBy: dcrane On: Fri Feb 08, 2013 6:05 am

I cant add much to what these guys have said... your draft should increase as your heat output increases and decrease as you tune your stove down (the baro helps regulate this draft to try and keep it at as constant/stable as possible). Once you set it according to your manufactures spec's you should not need to adjust it with changing temp's and/or changing heat output settings on your stove (this is what a baro does for you automatically). You should inspect it from time to time to make sure its functioning properly, not getting rusty, etc.

Now... the more difficult question that will surly get my good friends on this forum riled up :D .... they can smell it coming and know what im about say already :P

Many of us believe that proper use of an MPD (Manual Pipe Damper) is a more efficient way to regulate draft, save money, be safer, etc. Many who are experienced coal burners use both a baro and an MPD to get the best of both worlds! Im not going to get into the politics here about these options and methods because it can swiftly turn into a riot plus the fact that i assure you their are some very heated threads regarding this :mad: ....I just want to let you know this may be an option you wish to try or use the search function on the forum to investigate.... here is one example of a famous Nepacrossroad thread Manual pipe dampers .. how, why, when
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: A different draft question?

PostBy: Lightning On: Fri Feb 08, 2013 8:02 am

Well stated my friends :) I agree with the best of both worlds philosophy lol. There are occasions where my baro won't hold the draft under a -.05 such as during high winds or extreme cold outside, so I'll use the MPD to cut it down to a -.03 and then the baro will successfully regulate it from there.

I would be extremely cautious using a MPD on an appliance that has a combustion blower or an exhaust blower though. A situation like that could cause positive pressure in the fire box or flue pipe, and we don't want that...
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash

Re: A different draft question?

PostBy: Canaan coal man On: Fri Feb 08, 2013 10:30 am

Ok well i just wanted to make sure my system was working properly. Iv read allot of posts on here were people set and for get the baro. I was just a little confused because i was always adjusting mine depending on how i fired the stove.
Canaan coal man
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing III Top Vent

Re: A different draft question?

PostBy: baddawg On: Fri Feb 08, 2013 6:04 pm

dcrane wrote:I cant add much to what these guys have said... your draft should increase as your heat output increases and decrease as you tune your stove down (the baro helps regulate this draft to try and keep it at as constant/stable as possible). Once you set it according to your manufactures spec's you should not need to adjust it with changing temp's and/or changing heat output settings on your stove (this is what a baro does for you automatically). You should inspect it from time to time to make sure its functioning properly, not getting rusty, etc.

Now... the more difficult question that will surly get my good friends on this forum riled up :D .... they can smell it coming and know what im about say already :P

Many of us believe that proper use of an MPD (Manual Pipe Damper) is a more efficient way to regulate draft, save money, be safer, etc. Many who are experienced coal burners use both a baro and an MPD to get the best of both worlds! Im not going to get into the politics here about these options and methods because it can swiftly turn into a riot plus the fact that i assure you their are some very heated threads regarding this :mad: ....I just want to let you know this may be an option you wish to try or use the search function on the forum to investigate.... here is one example of a famous Nepacrossroad thread Manual pipe dampers .. how, why, when


So DC you just couldn't resist bringing it up to some one in their first year burning coal :wtf:
baddawg
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Pioneer BV

Re: A different draft question?

PostBy: Canaan coal man On: Mon Feb 11, 2013 10:29 am

baddawg wrote:
dcrane wrote:I cant add much to what these guys have said... your draft should increase as your heat output increases and decrease as you tune your stove down (the baro helps regulate this draft to try and keep it at as constant/stable as possible). Once you set it according to your manufactures spec's you should not need to adjust it with changing temp's and/or changing heat output settings on your stove (this is what a baro does for you automatically). You should inspect it from time to time to make sure its functioning properly, not getting rusty, etc.

Now... the more difficult question that will surly get my good friends on this forum riled up :D .... they can smell it coming and know what im about say already :P

Many of us believe that proper use of an MPD (Manual Pipe Damper) is a more efficient way to regulate draft, save money, be safer, etc. Many who are experienced coal burners use both a baro and an MPD to get the best of both worlds! Im not going to get into the politics here about these options and methods because it can swiftly turn into a riot plus the fact that i assure you their are some very heated threads regarding this :mad: ....I just want to let you know this may be an option you wish to try or use the search function on the forum to investigate.... here is one example of a famous Nepacrossroad thread Manual pipe dampers .. how, why, when


So DC you just couldn't resist bringing it up to some one in their first year burning coal :wtf:


Ya iv read some of that post and ill stick with the baro for now.
Canaan coal man
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing III Top Vent

Re: A different draft question?

PostBy: Rigar On: Mon Feb 11, 2013 10:44 am

Coalman

..have you determined if the "tee" for the liner inside the chimney is definitely capped off?
have you thoroughly sealed the opening around the stove pipe as it enters the chimney( at the thimble) ?

... if for some reason the T never got capped off inside the chimney.... you will literally have no control over your draft....( regardless if you use a baro or mpd.)
Rigar
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Keystoker A 150
Coal Size/Type: anthracite rice
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Re: A different draft question?

PostBy: Rigar On: Mon Feb 11, 2013 3:56 pm

Sorry...wrong thread ^
.....
Rigar
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Keystoker A 150
Coal Size/Type: anthracite rice
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: A 150 warm air furnace

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