Lightning Protection

Re: Lightning Protection

PostBy: Rick 386 On: Tue Feb 25, 2014 11:34 am

Sting,

You sir are SCREWED !!!!!!


Just make sure you have adequate homeowners insurance. Perhaps it is time to talk to your agent and see if they offer riders or something additional to protect that new smart TV.




Rick
Rick 386
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AA 260 heating both sides of twin farmhouse
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: LL Hyfire II w/ coaltrol in garage
Coal Size/Type: Pea in AA 260, Rice in LL Hyfire II
Other Heating: Gas fired infared at work

Re: Lightning Protection

PostBy: Sting On: Tue Feb 25, 2014 11:48 am

Rick 386 wrote:Sting,

You sir are SCREWED !!!!!!

Rick


That used to happen a lot -- in a far better way

But thanks for reminding me :D You say "Memories" I say mamories -

There should be a fix for all this drama but my pipe wrench isn't forthcoming with the answer
Sting
 
Other Heating: BurnHAM=NG-gas

Re: Lightning Protection

PostBy: titleist1 On: Tue Feb 25, 2014 12:11 pm

Just unplug all the wires going to the smart TV when not in use and don't watch it during storms!

That would be easier than running #6 copper all around your house to all those connections!! ;)
titleist1
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman Mag Stoker (old style) one in basement, one in workshop
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III on standby for long power outages
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite; Nut/Anthracite


Re: Lightning Protection

PostBy: Sting On: Tue Feb 25, 2014 12:22 pm

titleist1 wrote: running #6 copper all around your house to all those connections!! ;)


Sort of like the example to protect the cows in the barn ????

Well if it would work... what would I ground all that wire to? Is that wire buried under the soil or hung under the siding? BTW the dwelling siding is old STEEL laped
Sting
 
Other Heating: BurnHAM=NG-gas

Re: Lightning Protection

PostBy: titleist1 On: Tue Feb 25, 2014 12:35 pm

Sting wrote:Sort of like the example to protect the cows in the barn ????


no...i meant using the #6 to tie all the separate ground points together as described in Yanches post. That would keep all the volt / amp levels at each ground rod the same and keep it from traveling through your house / electronic equipment to get from one ground 'rod' to the other as it seeks equilibrium.
titleist1
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman Mag Stoker (old style) one in basement, one in workshop
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III on standby for long power outages
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite; Nut/Anthracite

Re: Lightning Protection

PostBy: Sting On: Tue Feb 25, 2014 2:21 pm

OK I get it

thinking --- I have miles of old wire in the junk yard -- Stuff removed from the hi lines of the old township rural electrification. Its not copper but it is quite large uninsulated line.

Its not #6 maybe 10?? so like others have asked about running two smaller pipes to replace the correct size for flow -

Would two or may three strands sort of woven in line - do the job of tiding all these points together?
Sting
 
Other Heating: BurnHAM=NG-gas

Re: Lightning Protection

PostBy: Freddy On: Tue Feb 25, 2014 2:33 pm

[quote="coalnewbie"] I am down in Ocala, Florida .... here is the question... lightning protection. /quote]

I had never in my life seen lightning strike with my own eyes until I was in Florida. In 1976 I spent 3 months there & I personally witnessed lightning strike several times....I lost count! More than 4 times, less then 6 or 7, but the point being, Florida has lightning a LOT!
Freddy
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 130 (pea)
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Reading piece o' junk in the barn (rice)
Coal Size/Type: Pea size, Superior, deep mined

Re: Lightning Protection

PostBy: westom On: Tue Feb 25, 2014 10:57 pm

Sting wrote: OMG that's 4 or more now and as Yanchee points out-- just the tip of the iceberg ---> such as: ground wires ( trace wire) on the NG gas lines that enter vie two meters attached to the various buildings - sub panels and ground rods in at least three other locations


Earth ground must provide equipotential and conductivity. In your case, conductivity exists. By implementing preferred or right solutions from this utility, then equipotential (single point earth ground) is created. Interconnecting wires are outside and buried. Buried wire gauge and minimum depth is defined by local electric codes for human safety. A tech tip demonstrates good, bad, and ugly (preferred, wrong, and right) solutions:
http://www.duke-energy.com/indiana-busi ... tip-08.asp

Unplugging is a least reliable solution since most surges occur before anyone even thinks about unplugging. And since so many household devices cannot be unplugged. A useful solution means everythng is protected without depending on something that is unreliable. By manually disconnecting everything (including all clocks and smoke detectors) in a building.
westom
 
Stove/Furnace Make: custom
Stove/Furnace Model: none

Re: Lightning Protection

PostBy: Sting On: Wed Feb 26, 2014 8:39 am

The place has been subject to many "electrical" events in my life time. Some worse than others. I finally know a good reason why!

Thank- you everyone that contributed [ and will contribute ] to this thread
Sting
 
Other Heating: BurnHAM=NG-gas

Re: Lightning Protection

PostBy: Yanche On: Thu Feb 27, 2014 3:05 pm

Freddy wrote:
coalnewbie wrote: I am down in Ocala, Florida .... here is the question... lightning protection. /quote]

I had never in my life seen lightning strike with my own eyes until I was in Florida. In 1976 I spent 3 months there & I personally witnessed lightning strike several times....I lost count! More than 4 times, less then 6 or 7, but the point being, Florida has lightning a LOT!

In my working career I spent considerable time in FL on spacecraft launches. The joke was that the local power company supplying the cape, FL Power and Light, was called Flicker and Flash Power. Lightning is a very serious issue there and during launch countdown we ran our ground support equipment on generators with utility power being the backup. It was determined to be more reliable that way. The thinking changed after a second power company feed was installed bring power down from Titusville, FL as a second path.
Yanche
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Alternate Heating Systems S-130
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Pea

Re: Lightning Protection

PostBy: grumpy On: Thu Feb 27, 2014 3:26 pm

Orlando is the lighting capital of the usa.. Yanche what did you do ?
grumpy
 

Re: Lightning Protection

PostBy: Flyer5 On: Sun Mar 16, 2014 9:16 pm

Not sure if you can fully protect against lightning. It travels 20miles through air so if it thinks your electronics are the easiest path to earth well there gone. :blowup: I was never really nervous about lightning till I saw someone hit at the beach. Not pretty. now it scares the *censored* out of me
Flyer5
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Leisure Line WL110
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Leisure Line Pioneer

Re: Lightning Protection

PostBy: Sting On: Mon Mar 17, 2014 7:54 am

OH - Thanks for that in my head for the rest of the day!
Sting
 
Other Heating: BurnHAM=NG-gas


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