hard vs soft coal

hard vs soft coal

PostBy: Paulie On: Thu Mar 14, 2013 9:02 am

Studying for my engineers license, and was surprised to learn that soft coal actually had a higher btu value than hard? Who knew?
Paulie
 
Stove/Furnace Make: leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Pioneer

Re: hard vs soft coal

PostBy: dcrane On: Thu Mar 14, 2013 9:29 am

that can be very deceiving because of all the volatiles in soft coal its swiftly produces higher BTU's and then all those unburned gasses flow right out your chimney :cry: Im sure someone can explain it better and has some more "real"
values as they apply to heating your home... just dont assume soft coal will produce more usable heat for you vs. hard coal.
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: hard vs soft coal

PostBy: LsFarm On: Thu Mar 14, 2013 9:32 am

In the correclty designed appliance, the volitiles are burnt in the stove, and the BTU's are recovered.

A Hotblast designed antique stove is pretty good, for a hand feed, and the stokermatics and Combustioneers are very good too.

Greg L
LsFarm
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland


Re: hard vs soft coal

PostBy: McGiever On: Thu Mar 14, 2013 9:33 am

Yes, some are higher, some are not. There are a lot of variables depending on the source of any coal. :)
McGiever
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AXEMAN-ANDERSON 130 "1959"
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: HARMAN MAGNUM
Hand Fed Coal Stove: RADIANT HOME AIR BLAST
Baseburners & Antiques: OUR GLENWOOD 111 BASEBURNER "1908"
Coal Size/Type: PEA / ANTHRACITE, NUT-STOVE / ANTHRACITE
Other Heating: Ground Source Heat Pump
Stove/Furnace Make: Hydro Heat /Mega Tek

Re: hard vs soft coal

PostBy: dcrane On: Thu Mar 14, 2013 11:44 am

McGiever wrote:Yes, some are higher, some are not. There are a lot of variables depending on the source of any coal.


:mad: :mad: our good friend McGiever happens to be sitting on some of the best stoves for both hard N soft so everything is just roses N cherries to him :mad: :mad:

Teasin' McG :lol:
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: hard vs soft coal

PostBy: Lightning On: Thu Mar 14, 2013 2:53 pm

I've read that some bit coals have up to 15000 btus per pound. Which I thought was pretty impressive. I'm currently dabbling with some bit coal. It's like trying to tame a wild animal lol. It seems to me that it has a two phase burn. The first few hours while the volatile gases are burning off, it's pretty unstable and can rage with the slightest change of combustion air. The rest of the burn it seems to behave like ant coal. This is my experience so far.
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Stove Size Mix

Re: hard vs soft coal

PostBy: carlherrnstein On: Thu Mar 14, 2013 3:53 pm

The soft coal I get from new lexington ohio has about 12,500 btus a pound. The thing you need to remember is that soft coal has hydrocarbons in it along with fixed carbon which turns to coke. A underfed stoker will burn just about all of the hydrocarbons up.
carlherrnstein
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: combustioneer model 77B
Coal Size/Type: pea stoker/Ohio bituminous

Re: hard vs soft coal

PostBy: Scottscoaled On: Thu Mar 14, 2013 3:59 pm

What I would like to know, is the volume of a ton of Bit pretty much the same as a ton of Anthracite?
Scottscoaled
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM 520x3, 700 Van Wert 800
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: EFM 150, Keystoker 150
Coal Size/Type: Lots of buck

Re: hard vs soft coal

PostBy: Lightning On: Thu Mar 14, 2013 4:08 pm

It would depend on what form its in size wise. Nut rice or stove size. I would think the ant coal has a higher density.
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Stove Size Mix

Re: hard vs soft coal

PostBy: LDPosse On: Thu Mar 14, 2013 4:45 pm

Lightning wrote:It would depend on what form its in size wise. Nut rice or stove size. I would think the ant coal has a higher density.


The bit coals I've tried so far (PA and MD coals) seem to be about the same, volume-wise as ant.
LDPosse
 
Stove/Furnace Make: DS Machine
Stove/Furnace Model: DS1500, Kozy King 100

Re: hard vs soft coal

PostBy: Lightning On: Thu Mar 14, 2013 6:20 pm

I would think they would be so close in volume that if you are sizing a bin to build, it wouldn't matter. Coal size would be a more important factor since a ton of rice would take up less volume than a ton of stove size.
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Stove Size Mix

Re: hard vs soft coal

PostBy: steamup On: Thu Mar 14, 2013 6:34 pm

Paulie wrote:Studying for my engineers license, and was surprised to learn that soft coal actually had a higher btu value than hard? Who knew?



The dead men knew. At the turn of the century, the US navy would specify only Pocahantas coal because it was the best and almost smokeless.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pocahontas_Coalfield
steamup
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman-Anderson AA-130, Keystoker K-6
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: HS Tarm 502 Wood/Coal/Oil
Coal Size/Type: pea, buck, rice

Re: hard vs soft coal

PostBy: Scottscoaled On: Thu Mar 14, 2013 7:50 pm

Lightning wrote:I would think they would be so close in volume that if you are sizing a bin to build, it wouldn't matter. Coal size would be a more important factor since a ton of rice would take up less volume than a ton of stove size.

Why would a ton of stove take up more space than a ton of rice? Shouldn't it be the other way around? I was wondering if a ton of Bit takes up somewhere in the neighborhood of 40cubic feet?
Scottscoaled
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM 520x3, 700 Van Wert 800
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: EFM 150, Keystoker 150
Coal Size/Type: Lots of buck

Re: hard vs soft coal

PostBy: Lightning On: Thu Mar 14, 2013 8:12 pm

The rice coal is packed more tightly together. There is less space between the pieces. Where as with stove size, especially since the pieces are shaped irregularly, there is much more space between the pieces. The difference in volume isn't "huge" but there is some.
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Stove Size Mix

Re: hard vs soft coal

PostBy: Scottscoaled On: Thu Mar 14, 2013 9:36 pm

I don't think that is the case. A perfect ton of coal would be a square block. As soon as it is broken in half it takes up more room. That keeps going. As the pieces get smaller, they weigh less, have more surface area, and take up more volume. I know a ton of nut in a pickup bed takes up considerably less space than a ton of rice.
Scottscoaled
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM 520x3, 700 Van Wert 800
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: EFM 150, Keystoker 150
Coal Size/Type: Lots of buck