The bees' new home

Re: The bees' new home

PostBy: Sting On: Mon Mar 18, 2013 2:32 pm

At one point in the 80's I attempted to reclaim the family Hobby/legacy --- I certainly had enough equipment - so I purchased 10 packages of bees and took a stab

Major failure -- Since I was tied to a long hours day job - all I had was weekends - if the weather was poor - you don't work a large hive - so after 14 days of inattention all I had was a mess

And after several of those "events" in the season - I didn't even have enough honey to over winter

I did attempt to feed them after packing for winter - but the following spring - it was all over cept the beer at the burn pile!

All the equipment went away on ebay but even using your suggestions - I would still fail for lack of correct management time

So I buy my 5 pounds a year at the farmers market when the run is nice and light colored


THANK_YOU for being a bee keeper - Its not easy - the reward is not great - but we need bees to sustain our life
Sting
 
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Re: The bees' new home

PostBy: McGiever On: Mon Mar 18, 2013 5:55 pm

Those TBHs are very popular in the poorer developing countries. There, among other things, the climate is more tropical, and that's a good thing...flowers in abundance and for longer season. The other big factor is due to little or no money the TBH requires little materials, and basically can be constructed w/ junk. A steel drums split in half length-wise will yield 2 TBHs of very large capacity. Various Charity Organization enlist beekeepers to travel to these regions to help get these people jump-started into beekeeping/honey production for an income producing occupation.
Thought you may like to know that TBHs can also be life changer for some. :)
McGiever
 
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Re: The bees' new home

PostBy: lowfog01 On: Mon Mar 18, 2013 6:11 pm

KLook wrote:I fail to see in the pictures how it is superior. I understand all about the work as I had the extractor and all the other stuff. Time consuming and a mess.
Somehow, you remove comb and squeeze it more easily then the rectangle frames. How do you keep the queen out of the comb and what size and shapes are they to make them more manageable? I will go do a little research at Dadant as I am goingto have a hive or 2 here in Tenn. I see them all over the place.

Kevin


sent PM
lowfog01
 
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Re: The bees' new home

PostBy: lowfog01 On: Mon Mar 18, 2013 6:25 pm

McGiever wrote:Those TBHs are very popular in the poorer developing countries. There, among other things, the climate is more tropical, and that's a good thing...flowers in abundance and for longer season. The other big factor is due to little or no money the TBH requires little materials, and basically can be constructed w/ junk. A steel drums split in half length-wise will yield 2 TBHs of very large capacity. Various Charity Organization enlist beekeepers to travel to these regions to help get these people jump-started into beekeeping/honey production for an income producing occupation.
Thought you may like to know that TBHs can also be life changer for some. :)


Yes, they certainly changed my life. Beekeeping is a marketable skill which many people learn and teach in the Peace Corp. At my bee class this weekend they had TBH made out of just about everything - a huge ceramic planter, milk weed stalks and old tires. Anything goes with the State Aparist as long as it has removable combs. Lisa
lowfog01
 
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Re: The bees' new home

PostBy: coalkirk On: Tue Mar 19, 2013 12:12 pm

Very interesting indeed. You've created quite a buzz on the forum. :lol:
coalkirk
 
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Re: The bees' new home

PostBy: lowfog01 On: Tue Mar 19, 2013 8:47 pm

coalkirk wrote:Very interesting indeed. You've created quite a buzz on the forum. :lol:


Congratulations you've earned extra points for the double entendre. :D


The next few days will be very interesting indeed. The moved bees are doing well but that is only half of the operation. Up next - splitting the hive and installing a new queen in the split. Unfortunately, the weather is not cooperating . I'm picking up the new bees and queen tomorrow evening and will keep them in the garage overnight. (I'd put them inside but DK has visions of an "I love Lucy" outcome.) Thursday is the interesting part because its forecast to be the coldest all week. On top of that they are calling for spotty showers. Believe me you don’t want to be working in a bee hive on a overcast, wet, cold day. Those bees won’t see the need to proceed the same way I do… but the new bees are on the end of a long, cramped trip from GA and they have just about had it. I could lose the entire package if I wait to Friday. I guess I’ll play it by ear on a wing and a prayer. Lisa
lowfog01
 
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