Mini split systems

Mini split systems

PostBy: boatsnhoes On: Fri Mar 22, 2013 2:35 pm

Does anyone have a mini split system to supplement their coal heat.I hear the ones with the higher seer rating are a lot more efficient.Do they need to be installed by a qualified hvac tech. or can you install yourself?
boatsnhoes
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: pioneer

Re: Mini split systems

PostBy: Freddy On: Fri Mar 22, 2013 3:40 pm

I installed my own, BUT, I hired a licensed AC guy to do the evac & pressure test. Yes, they are quite efficient, but don't get all excited about the actual numbers. ALL new units must meet government specs & the actual difference between a 14 SEER and a (pick a higher number) SEER may not be much different at all. It used to be the SEER was the SEER, but all the new ones are variable speed. Now the SEER number is the number measured jusssssst when the temperature is satisfied and the unit is jusssst about to shut off. So although you may be getting an accurate rating, it might be accurate for only seconds during the entire cycle. MY AC guy says the bottom line as far as he's concerned is : Buy a brand name. The cheapies are just that....cheap.
Freddy
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 130 (pea)
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Reading piece o' junk in the barn (rice)
Coal Size/Type: Pea size, Superior, deep mined

Re: Mini split systems

PostBy: boatsnhoes On: Fri Mar 22, 2013 5:36 pm

Thank you freddy ,your input is greatly appreciated.I am expecting that these systems work way better than those(room to room)quartz heaters that they claim operate on pennies a day!!! I have been doing some research on the mini splits and probably gunna go with a dual or tri zone system.Again this is only supplement my
coal stove and I can also get rid of all those window ac units !!!!!!!!!!!
boatsnhoes
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: pioneer


Re: Mini split systems

PostBy: Yanche On: Sat Mar 23, 2013 5:29 pm

I installed my own Sanyo mini-split inverter style system two years ago. It was primarily installed for cooling a previous open porch that was converted to living space. The condenser unit is connected to two, wall mounted air handlers. I'm very pleased with the unit, very very quiet both inside in out. Fan speeds vary, depending on demand.

Installation had two distinct parts. The home improvement part and the HVAC part. I did both. It was a challenge getting the air handler's mounted and the electrical, HVAC and drain lines installed. The porch was easy because it was new construction. The existing master bedroom was much more difficult. Drywall removal, new electric lines, etc. The big concern is the flare fittings and their seal. In my case they are covered by drywall. It's got to be done right or repair gets you back to step one. The master bedroom unit allows us to not operate the central A/C when sleeping in all but the hottest of nights. A considerable savings.

HVAC interests me and I have taken all the courses offered at my local public tech school/community college. I have a MD apprentice HVAC license and the EPA certificates for handling refrigerants. I bought all the needed tools and equipment. In my opinion the line sets should be pressure tested with nitrogen as the installation goes along. This precludes closing up something with a leak. I did this. Some will tell you vacuum is good enough. I don't think so. R410 pressures are quite high and you need a robust test. The most a vacuum test can do is 15 psi. A nitrogen test can do 100-200 psi.

Evacuating the lines requires a vacuum pump and a micron gauge. Some cheat and just let the pump run extra long. I think this is taking a chance. My line runs were within the factory charge limits and i didn't have to add additional refrigerant. I was prepared to do this by weighing in refrigerant with a scale. This was my first install and I learned a lot. There were lots of back tracks along the way but in the end the operation and satisfaction is outstanding.

My recommendation for homeowner would be not to attempt the HVAC part of the install. There are just too many expensive tools to own and more importantly knowledge you don't have. Concentrate on proper equipment selection and physical installation. I'd own a nitrogen pressure regulator and rent or borrow a tank for testing.
Yanche
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Alternate Heating Systems S-130
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Pea

Re: Mini split systems

PostBy: oilman On: Mon Mar 25, 2013 12:03 pm

Yanche has the know-how to do it by his training, etc, but I would not recommend this as a DIY job.
Freddy is right, do not shop this by price, there is a reason certain brands are higher priced. I have had good results with Mistubishi, Panasonic (formally Sanyo) and Fujitsu.
Yes,mini splits are very efficient.Biggest advantage is how quiet they are.
oilman
 

Re: Mini split systems

PostBy: Scottaw On: Sat Feb 15, 2014 12:20 pm

I have a pair of Fujitsu 9RLS2 in my house, and they're amazing. I just installed my coal this year, and had 2 years of the mini splits doing all the heating. In the coldest months they cost about $100-125 each to run, and together they're heating around 2000sf. They're super quiet, and really move a ton of air. They're so efficient the AC is basically free.

That said, they are still more of a space heating appliance. Luckily my house has an open floor plan and moves air easily. They're not the easiest things to clean either.

Now with the coal in the basement, I let the heat rise and the heat pumps move the air around, it's a great combination.

I plan to stop burning coal once it's consistently around 40, the pumps will be the only heat for the shoulder seasons since it's so much easier to control.

I did a ton of research before buying and if you're considering one I'll be glad to answer anything I can.
Scottaw
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Hitzer
Stove/Furnace Model: 50-93

Re: Mini split systems

PostBy: coalkirk On: Sun Feb 23, 2014 9:19 am

One thing to consider about the mini split system heat pumps. They do not have any backup electric resistance like a typical h/p system does. That may or may not be a concern depending on how you plan to use it. If its the only heat for an area such as an additon and it breaks there is no backup. Otherwise these systems are nice.
coalkirk
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Harman VF3000
Coal Size/Type: antrhcite/rice coal

Re: Mini split systems

PostBy: McGiever On: Sun Feb 23, 2014 11:36 am

coalkirk wrote:One thing to consider about the mini split system heat pumps. They do not have any backup electric resistance like a typical h/p system does. That may or may not be a concern depending on how you plan to use it. If its the only heat for an area such as an additon and it breaks there is no backup. Otherwise these systems are nice.



Are you sure about this? Is maybe it an option?
I was pretty sure I had been around units w/ electric resistance B/U heaters built in at one time.
McGiever
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AXEMAN-ANDERSON 130 "1959"
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: HARMAN MAGNUM
Hand Fed Coal Stove: RADIANT HOME AIR BLAST
Baseburners & Antiques: OUR GLENWOOD 111 BASEBURNER "1908"
Coal Size/Type: PEA / ANTHRACITE, NUT-STOVE / ANTHRACITE
Other Heating: Ground Source Heat Pump
Stove/Furnace Make: Hydro Heat /Mega Tek

Re: Mini split systems

PostBy: Scottaw On: Sun Feb 23, 2014 1:22 pm

I can confirm the fujitsu units do not have a strip backup. That said, mine were still putting out heat at -10, with no other backup (pre coal stove)
Scottaw
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Hitzer
Stove/Furnace Model: 50-93

Re: Mini split systems

PostBy: Freddy On: Sun Feb 23, 2014 1:38 pm

Scottaw wrote:mine were still putting out heat at -10,


Yup, yup, I've heard tell they will make heat when it's somewhere near stupid cold outside, BUT... as the temp drops they become less and less efficient. I'm thinking my AC guy said they approach zero....meaning, at some very low outside temperature, they are very close, or the same as, a resistance heater.

For those units that don't have a resistance heater built in.... Go buy a $39 oil filled electric heater. Not cheap to use, but cheaper than frozen pipes.
Freddy
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 130 (pea)
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Reading piece o' junk in the barn (rice)
Coal Size/Type: Pea size, Superior, deep mined

Re: Mini split systems

PostBy: plumberman On: Fri Mar 07, 2014 7:05 pm

samsung has super quiet units, their single units vary speed the compressor and indoor fan unit to match loads. i personaly have 2 units in my house and installed a bunch of others and every one loves theires. if you don't have youre own vaccum pump and gauges i would hire some one for install. the right person can do a nice install for years of trouble free service in a few hours! verses cobb job/problems.
plumberman
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: coal gun 130
Coal Size/Type: pea
Other Heating: solar dhw