stuff for reloading...

stuff for reloading...

PostBy: wilder11354 On: Fri Apr 05, 2013 8:34 pm

I still haven't gone and fine tuned scope on new rifle, but i will this weekend, sunday probably. in the mean time am getting some components to reload/load some ammo. First i am going to try some Nosler 55gr combination tech silvertip varmint bullets,
http://www.nosler.com/Bullets/Combined-Technology.aspx
This link is broken, either the page no longer exists or there is some other issue like a typo.
, using new winchester brass, cci primers, and if local sports shop down the road has it, IMR 8208 XBR powder. Looking to get about 3800FPS, flat minimal drop rounds for gophers, and turkeys in fall.

Other bullet will be a hornaday 100gr interlok BTSP http://www.hornady.com/store/6mm-.243-100-gr-BTSP/ for deer if i decide to hunt them.
wilder11354
 
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Re: stuff for reloading...

PostBy: KLook On: Fri Apr 05, 2013 11:20 pm

Good luck with accuracy over that wide of a bullet selection. The twist rate for the .243 will stabilize one or the other but not both. If memory serves me, you will have best results with bullets in between those weights. Also, anything lighter then 100 grains is not designed for deer sized game, but many have been taken with them. However, if you push light bullets to fast, they will blow up and not penetrate on a deer. I had this happen with a .250 Savage with 90 gr. bullets. I have heard of it many times from other handloaders. Components must be selected for the intended use as none of them are designed to work in all situations.
Anyhoooo, have fun and good luck dialing it in.

Kevin
KLook
 
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Re: stuff for reloading...

PostBy: grumpy On: Sat Apr 06, 2013 2:25 am

What Cal are you loading? 55 to 100 is a big spread. I would think your not going to use the same power for both those loads.. tell me more..

Here is my load at 110 yards, 22-250. Thats five rounds in the head of the dime. Not the dime, the head of the dime..
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Re: stuff for reloading...

PostBy: mozz On: Sat Apr 06, 2013 7:58 am

H-380 for the 22-250?
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Re: stuff for reloading...

PostBy: KLook On: Sat Apr 06, 2013 8:11 am

God I love this forum! Lots of people that do what I do. And very nice group grumpy. :shock: The best I ever got was .333 at 100 with a .257 Ackley Improved 40*. How about describing the setup? Action, stock, optics, rest, etc.

Kevin
KLook
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Harman VF 3000
Coal Size/Type: rice, bagged, Blaschak
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman (Back In Maine)
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Re: stuff for reloading...

PostBy: Flyer5 On: Sat Apr 06, 2013 9:17 am

KLook wrote:Good luck with accuracy over that wide of a bullet selection. The twist rate for the .243 will stabilize one or the other but not both. If memory serves me, you will have best results with bullets in between those weights. Also, anything lighter then 100 grains is not designed for deer sized game, but many have been taken with them. However, if you push light bullets to fast, they will blow up and not penetrate on a deer. I had this happen with a .250 Savage with 90 gr. bullets. I have heard of it many times from other handloaders. Components must be selected for the intended use as none of them are designed to work in all situations.
Anyhoooo, have fun and good luck dialing it in.

Kevin



I know a girl that hunts with a .223 62 grain. And she hears that often. :D Gets a deer or 2 every year. Never lost one. :P
Flyer5
 
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Re: stuff for reloading...

PostBy: wilder11354 On: Sat Apr 06, 2013 10:11 pm

well the intended use for the 55Gr bullet is varmints(whilstle pigs, wild turkeys), out to 300 yds. the 100Gr bullet will be for whitetail out to 100 yards, and will be using a different powder.
wilder11354
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Harman SF260
Coal Size/Type: nut or pea, anthracite
Other Heating: crown oil boiler, backup.if needed

Re: stuff for reloading...

PostBy: Flyer5 On: Sat Apr 06, 2013 10:35 pm

Well I was able fire off a few rounds today to celebrate the first day it felt like spring. I picked up some hollow points for my carry gun and wanted to see how they shoot. At 25yds much bigger pattern about 10" diameter with 5 rounds compared to 4" pattern with the FMJ. I also fired off 20 rounds with the 223 black rifle. Not bad I just swapped scopes from one rifle to the other I was surprised how close the picatinny rails can be from 2 different Mfrs I was about 2" low but nice group. Nice day.
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Re: stuff for reloading...

PostBy: KLook On: Sun Apr 07, 2013 12:55 am

I know a girl that hunts with a .223 62 grain. And she hears that often. :D Gets a deer or 2 every year. Never lost one. :P


Then I will open a can of worms. :P There is not 1 hunter in a 1000 that is qualified to use a caliber that small and a bullet that small on deer. Having said that opening statement, I will go on to say that there are deer and then there are big deer. My ancestors used anything they could get, they were not worried about losing one or ethics of a clean kill. They needed to eat. However, they were superb marksmen and woodsmen, they could track a deer across a hot top parking lot. My uncle's killed a bear with a .22 long rifle. Many of the hunters in the early part of the last century used cartridges that are very inferior to modern examples. My family moved on to the best they could buy as soon as they could. I remember well my father talking about his uncles back in the 40's using the Winchester .351 cartridge in a semi-auto. It was like shooting them with a bad handgun round. And contrary to the "thick" woods of Maine, they hunted meadows and blueberry fields by driving the game. Anyhow, a .223 will not penetrate a deer and come out. It is very rare that a .270 with a 130 or 150 bullet will do that. Next is the fact that the entry wound is so small that the animal will not bleed. I have shot a deer with a .35 Rem and had an entry wound big enough to stick my thumb in, and had it plug with a string of fat that hung out of the deer 6 inches. I found the deer through diligence and practice with real woodsmen, and plenty of my own time in the woods. That 217 lb. buck went over 100 yards without a sign of being hit or bleeding. And he was in a thicket.
Yes, small calibers can kill and are great for light weight people that may not handle recoil. But there is more to getting the animal then punching his skin with a needle. I have many more stories about trophy size bucks taking a shellacking with a large powerful round and heading for the next county.
Now, as I said, there are deer and there are big deer. You guys live in areas where there are gobs of deer and probably don't care much about losing one. I know people that will not even look if the deer runs out of sight. I am a light caliber guy myself, using a .250 Savage, a .270 Win, and a .308 Win. the heaviest bullets I use are 150 gr. Having said that, I have killed all bucks in my life, never a doe. I have 4 over 200lbs. and most of the others were in the 175 range or above. My brother has at least 8 over 200 and has taken many more then me. He would not even consider a bullet under 150grs. and I would not consider one under 100grs. And at that weight, the shot placement would have to be careful and solid. AND that is from 2 guys that have been called in to track wounded game for other hunters. Not bragging, just saying that we are rare birds in today's heater hunting crowd. Read, read, read, there are many theories on what is killing power. Some want an exit wound. Some think it is more important for the energy to be retained in the animal. Some think high velocity is "shocking power". My experience and my families generational experience tells me that an exit wound is great, but placement is paramount, with any cartridge that will penetrate to the heart/lungs of the intended game from the angle of the shot taken. And the unexpected will happen and you had better be able to follow up. That is where the skill comes in, anyone can shoot a gun.
It is still legal in Maine to use a .22 caliber gun, not the .22 Long Rifle, but from the .22 Magnum on up. If it was up to me it would be changed to the
.243 caliber and 100gr. bullets. Every single season we heard of a kid or some expert with his .223 hitting a nice buck and loosing it. Over and over. Year after year. They would be found dead after a week or so, just a waste of a fine animal. My brother taught hunter safety and every year he would have to bite his lip when junior would say with excitement that dad was outfitting him with a .223. Because dad was sitting there and that was what he used because it was so flat shooting and lethal and all. Bottom line, you cannot cheat physics which is the basis of ballistics. Velocity is good, up to a point and depending on the bullet construction. Weight is good, lack of it and much of it, up to a point.
That is why I have posted about people saying what a lethal round the .223 is. If you are going to shoot me, make it with a .223 please, not a 30-06. People think the .223 was developed with magic to make it more lethal. It was developed to JUST barely meet the minimum standards for the military. It will penetrate a helmet at 300yrds. and is accurate out to 600, although it has no gas left in the tank at that range. It allowed the men to carry more ammo and the object was cover fire or suppression fire. Deer or other animals are MUCH tougher them people.
The hunter must be able to shoot accurately. If this means he must use lighter rounds, then he must be ethical in picking his shot.
They must chose the right bullet/velocity combination for the game intended.
They must assume mistakes or "miracle" animals and prepare to follow up on wounded game.
Long winded to be sure, but there is a lot of thought and historical experience and that of others I hunt with behind those words. I probably could train to kill a deer with a knife lashed to a stick, but I will pass on that thanks. I do have a bow but only recently acquired it and have not taken a deer with one.
Feel free to give me a good tongue lashing if you like, but back it up with facts.

Kevin

Oh an by the way, our military has had to return to the .308 Nato round and other guns for the conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan. The wide open spaces make the anemic .223 useless. Fine within short ranges for firing lots of shells, not so much for engaging at hundreds of yards with a superior AK-47 round.
KLook
 
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Coal Size/Type: rice, bagged, Blaschak
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman (Back In Maine)
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Re: stuff for reloading...

PostBy: DieselBob On: Sun Apr 07, 2013 1:03 am

Flyer5 wrote:Well I was able fire off a few rounds today to celebrate the first day it felt like spring. I picked up some hollow points for my carry gun and wanted to see how they shoot.

A carry gun. I remember reading something about that. Some states with common sense seem to allow that Constitutional right. Doesn't seem to be something that applies in the Peoples Republic of Maryland unless you are one of the chosen few deemed important, like the members of the general assembly that have striped that same right from the citizens. I use to reload with a friend sometime back and really found it interesting trying different bullet weights and power types and loads for my 357 mag and 45 ACP. Very nice grouping grumpy.
DieselBob