Making new firebrick for your old stove

Making new firebrick for your old stove

PostBy: dcrane On: Mon Apr 08, 2013 7:14 am

after seeing so many post about how best to replace custom firebrick on your antique stove I thought a few photo's might be worth a thousands words...

The only thing required is to know how thick the firebrick should be and the diameter of the firebox, this can be done in the same manner using plastic to make the radius pieces (sometimes cutting some old five gallon buckets and then bending works well) and then super gluing sides onto these radius peices and then cutting off the sides to the proper thickness firebrick you wish to achieve.

In most cases to make the full cylinder will require 3 peices for easy removal from the molds as well as making absolutly sure you can get them into the door or through the top of whatever stove your working on (this can be increased to as many peices as needed to achieve your full cylinder and to insure you can get them into the stove).

with these molds its as easy as mixing up some rutland (I do not suggest going out and buying commercial genric refractory unless you know a lot about cement and coal stoves). Mix up your cement to a stiff enough consistancy to hold shape in the mold (oil the mold first with a brush and some motor oil or whatever is handy for ease of poping out the dryed casting), If you slip up and mix up the batch to wet let it slake in a bucket for awhile to stiffen up better before slopping it into the molds, you then can use an old shingle or thin strait metal to press down and sweap across those top edges of the molds (as i mimic doing in one of the photo's below to ensure no air pockets and to smooth the outer edge of the firebrick). Also note the removable end caps in each mold (these tap out after the firebrick sets and makes removal of the dryed firebrick very easy).

After you pop out your new firebricks the next day, place them in the oven at 300 for a few hours to cure before cementing them into your stove.

My molds are made of thin gauge steel so they will last a lifetime but again... they can be done in plastic as well. I used to have only one mold but made a couple more because I wanted a complete set to make the full cylinder in one swoop :P
Hope these photo's help give some idea's for others to assist them in making firebrick for their own stoves in the future!
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dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: Making new firebrick for your old stove

PostBy: Photog200 On: Mon Apr 08, 2013 11:30 am

I used the hammered in kind...your method would give you a smoother inside and the ash would slide down a lot easier. I always got bridging because the sides were rough. I even smoothed the sides down with a wet scurbie/spunge. Great idea my friend!
Randy
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base heater & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: Making new firebrick for your old stove

PostBy: dcrane On: Mon Apr 08, 2013 3:53 pm

Photog200 wrote:I used the hammered in kind...your method would give you a smoother inside and the ash would slide down a lot easier. I always got bridging because the sides were rough. I even smoothed the sides down with a wet scurbie/spunge. Great idea my friend!
Randy


Yes, the inside of the firebrick comes out as smooth as the plate of steel its sitting in, the outside is rougher (dependent on what you use to drag across it to "sluff" off to proper thickness: wood shingle = rougher, thin flat steel layed on it horizontally = smoother) but remember ...a slightly rough outside aids in securing it better to the walls or housing its going in.
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Visit Hitzer Stoves

Re: Making new firebrick for your old stove

PostBy: Rick 386 On: Mon Apr 08, 2013 10:09 pm

Nice...... I definitely like the removeable end caps.

Have you ever tried PAM cooking spray to coat the forms ?? Don't know if that would work or not but it is something most members could find in the kitchen.

Good job and great pics.


Time to move on to a video showing the whole process ???? ;)




Rick
Rick 386
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AA 260 heating both sides of twin farmhouse
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: LL Hyfire II w/ coaltrol in garage
Coal Size/Type: Pea in AA 260, Rice in LL Hyfire II
Other Heating: Gas fired infared at work

Re: Making new firebrick for your old stove

PostBy: dcrane On: Mon Apr 08, 2013 11:12 pm

Rick 386 wrote:Nice...... I definitely like the removeable end caps.

Have you ever tried PAM cooking spray to coat the forms ?? Don't know if that would work or not but it is something most members could find in the kitchen.

Good job and great pics.


Time to move on to a video showing the whole process ???? ;)




Rick


I wish I had a dig vid cam, i know my phone can do it so maybe i'll ask the kids to do one the next set of Crane 44 firebrick i make for someone and ad it here ;)
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Visit Hitzer Stoves