Saw Stop

Re: Saw Stop

PostBy: KLook On: Fri May 10, 2013 10:39 pm

I watch a guy break the rules every time I see him use the saw. He relies on his strength to bail him out. Leans out over the blade also with sawdust on a finished concrete floor. Asking to slip and put his hand or arm down. It will bite him eventually and I hope I am not in the shop when it happens.

Kevin
KLook
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Harman VF 3000
Coal Size/Type: rice, bagged, Blaschak
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman (Back In Maine)
Stove/Furnace Model: VF 3000

Re: Saw Stop

PostBy: NoSmoke On: Sun May 12, 2013 6:18 am

I look at tablesaws like trains; while they do kill and main people...that should never be the case. Just like a train, which stays on a track, a tablesaw's blade does not need to move in order to make the cut (other then spinning obviously). People only get cut by a tablesaw because they move their fingers close to the blade. On the railroad we had a rule; stay 4-1/2 feet from the outside rail and you will never get struck by a train, and so it is with a tablesaw...keep your fingers away from the blade area and you will never get cut.

The Sawstop would never work in my woodworking shop because I make my own lumber and much of it is wet. So it would be if a person sawed a lot of pressure treated lumber or used s-dry lumber which can be quite wet as well. This saw has its place, just not in my shop.
NoSmoke
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: New Yoker WC90
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vogelzang Pot Bellied Stove
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Other Heating: Munchkin LP Boiler (Back-up)

Re: Saw Stop

PostBy: Richard S. On: Sun May 12, 2013 7:19 am

NoSmoke wrote:The Sawstop would never work in my woodworking shop because I make my own lumber and much of it is wet..


I don't know for a fact but moisture itself may not be an issue, you need conductivity. It has an option to deactivate the brake.

http://www.sawstop.com/support/faqs

SawStop saws cut most wet wood without a problem. However, if the wood is very green or wet (for example, wet enough to spray a mist when cutting), or if the wood is both wet and pressure treated, then the wood may be sufficiently conductive to trigger the brake. Accordingly, the best practice is to dry wet or green wood before cutting by standing it inside and apart from other wood for about one day. You can also cut wet pressure treated wood and other conductive material by placing the saw in bypass mode to deactivate the safety system.
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite


Re: Saw Stop

PostBy: KLook On: Sun May 12, 2013 8:13 am

I am setting up a shop, and I am considering spending the extra money. It is not about keeping your hands out of the area. It is the accidents and kick backs that get you. I personally never run my hand past the blade where a kick back will suck my fingers across the blade. But the reason for the kick back can be the lack of downforce on a flimsy or warped piece. I also like the portable Dewalt I have that has a riving knife, it works superbly. I used to get hit with cedar shingles all the time but my hand didn't come with them. I know one guy that got hit in the eye with a knot and his reflex was to pull his hand back thru the blade which in my opinion was set to high also.
Bottom line, there are many tricks to minimize the risk, but there are always odd things happening. I will take the safety device and my fingers.

Kevin
KLook
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Harman VF 3000
Coal Size/Type: rice, bagged, Blaschak
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman (Back In Maine)
Stove/Furnace Model: VF 3000

Re: Saw Stop

PostBy: NoSmoke On: Sun May 12, 2013 7:04 pm

I understand what you are saying, but I also try to pick the right tool for the job too.

I have put up plenty of shingles, but my saw of choice would never be a tablesaw, I use a Scrollsaw for that. Light enough to grab and bring near the work, and yet able to cut tight corners, or even rip an entire shingle to width. I even went so far as to bring it on the roof when I shingled my copola due to all the angles and curves I had. That saved a lot of time, but mostly it was safe cutting those thin pieces of wood.

Same in the shop, my bandsaw is my go-to machine for most stuff. Cross cutting...a radial arm saw excels at that. Ripping boards down to width though...though my radial arm saw can do just as good of a job, the tablesaw does work better. I think it is about the only reason I got it. But then again I am not a carpenter...I am a woodworker and never am out of walking distance of my shop. Perhaps if I was, a tablesaw would have more use. Until then, I'll pretend it is a train and keep my hands well away from the blade.
NoSmoke
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: New Yoker WC90
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vogelzang Pot Bellied Stove
Coal Size/Type: Stove/Nut/Pea Anthracite
Other Heating: Munchkin LP Boiler (Back-up)

Re: Saw Stop

PostBy: KLook On: Sun May 12, 2013 8:57 pm

You missed my point, and I know how to grab the right tool. I have put on miles of cedar shingles. The point is anything with a moving sharp blade can hurt you bad. I saw a guy almost remove his thumb with a nice sharp handsaw. Another stuck his fingers in a router. Another in a joiner. I am going to buy the table saw made by this company at a cost of $1900 when I get the chance. There is another that cost $3500 but the lesser model will do. A fool and his money are soon parted, but this fool will not be parted from his fingers so easily. Not to mention, I know a good many farmers missing digits and such. You should know accidents happen to the best of us.

Kevin
KLook
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Harman VF 3000
Coal Size/Type: rice, bagged, Blaschak
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman (Back In Maine)
Stove/Furnace Model: VF 3000

Re: Saw Stop

PostBy: Rick 386 On: Sun May 12, 2013 9:44 pm

KLook wrote:You missed my point, and I know how to grab the right tool. I have put on miles of cedar shingles. The point is anything with a moving sharp blade can hurt you bad. I saw a guy almost remove his thumb with a nice sharp handsaw. Another stuck his fingers in a router. Another in a joiner. I am going to buy the table saw made by this company at a cost of $1900 when I get the chance. There is another that cost $3500 but the lesser model will do. A fool and his money are soon parted, but this fool will not be parted from his fingers so easily. Not to mention, I know a good many farmers missing digits and such. You should know accidents happen to the best of us.

Kevin



Kevin,

I've been waiting to get 1 myself. The reason is right here:
Safe Saw

Yep we have discussed this saw before. Me and Sting have both had our run ins with the dreaded table saw. My pics are the 4th post down on page 2.

All it took was just a slight lack of concentration , the need to quickly do something, and whammo, I was headed to the E.R......................

The finger tips get tingly at times. They get colder faster in the wintertime. And the 1 nail has not grown back entirely. But they still do function quite well.



Rick
Rick 386
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AA 260 heating both sides of twin farmhouse
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: LL Hyfire II w/ coaltrol in garage
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Other Heating: Gas fired infared at work

Re: Saw Stop

PostBy: Sting On: Sun May 12, 2013 11:52 pm

My finger almost works again

almost :oops:
Sting
 
Other Heating: OBSO Lennox Pulse "Air Scorcher" burning NG

Re: Saw Stop

PostBy: SMITTY On: Mon May 13, 2013 12:09 am

Any time I ran a table saw for any length of time, I'd make a thing out of wood that looked like a foot to push the wood through. My hands would never go near that blade. I was absolutely petrified of the blade.

If I lose digits, that means I have to PAY someone to repair my cars, structures, lawn equipment and motorcycles - I'll saw my head off at the neck before that happens!! :woot:
SMITTY
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Patriot Coal - custom built by Jim Dorsey
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Other Heating: Oil fired Burnham boiler

Re: Saw Stop

PostBy: Flyer5 On: Mon May 13, 2013 8:21 am

SMITTY wrote:Any time I ran a table saw for any length of time, I'd make a thing out of wood that looked like a foot to push the wood through. My hands would never go near that blade. I was absolutely petrified of the blade.

If I lose digits, that means I have to PAY someone to repair my cars, structures, lawn equipment and motorcycles - I'll saw my head off at the neck before that happens!! :woot:



I hear ya Smitty, I do the same thing. Usually always scraps laying around that can be used for that. Rick that pic made me cringe. I bet that wouldn't buff out.
Flyer5
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Leisure Line WL110
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