Anyone still shoot Super8 film?

Anyone still shoot Super8 film?

PostBy: europachris On: Sat Dec 29, 2007 10:41 pm

While I'm on the photography topic, does anyone fiddle with Super 8 film? Since we are all into "obsolete" coal, maybe some are into other obsolete hobbies?

I have some Super 8 movie equipment that I like to tinker with. I really enjoy the effect of real film that my camcorder just can't duplicate. I have a pretty high-end Panasonic digital (tape) camcorder, last of the single CCD models before the 3 CCD units became popular. It has very good low-light performance and really sharp video. But, the Super 8 just has that funky film feel to it, and I've got some night film of the Vegas strip we took on vacation some years ago that really turned out amazing.

I have several cameras picked up for a few dollars at thrift stores, a projector, screen, editing equipment, etc. It's a lot of fun, but not nearly as easy as dumping the videotape into the PC and putting it together and onto a DVD. It's also fairly expensive, considering a roll of film is good for 2-1/2 minutes of shooting. It does teach you to plan your shots with economy (less is more) and not sit there for 20 minutes watching Junior drool in his Cheerios.
europachris
 
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Re: Anyone still shoot Super8 film?

PostBy: av8r On: Sat Dec 29, 2007 11:46 pm

My father and I have some old super8 stuff, but I can't even tell you where it is now. Film is cool, but convenience has overcome my desire to use celluloid!
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Re: Anyone still shoot Super8 film?

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Sat Dec 29, 2007 11:48 pm

I wasn't aware that Super 8 film was still available, and I guess you can't take it to the pharmacy or supermarket to be developed either.
I never got into Super 8, my father had a Revere movie camera that shot 8mm, it used metal magazines that actually had a 16mm wide film inside. After shooting one side, you would remove the magazine and turn it over, like a cassette tape. During processing the film would be split down the middle and the ends spliced together. I still have the camera, in working condition, although I doubt I could get film for it. I also have the 4 socket light bar, and the best piece of the whole set, the 1948 Keystone projector, in working condition. I forgot to mention the portable screen, not the crummy kind produced later, but a real nice one with small glass particles bonded to it. I use the projector to view all the films my father shot over the years.
Actually, the whole idea may have been better then today's digital instant-gratification world. We'd wait until the film was ready, set up the projector, etc. and watch the film. When my daughter was small I showed her some of them for the first time, she suddenly said "Where's the sound?". I feel so old..... :(
I can post photos of the equipment if you like.

I also collect Argus C-3 35mm cameras (the first 35mm I learned to use), I have a Yashika 35mm SLR from approx. 1977 (bought new), one of the first Instamatic cameras, and other assorted junk. When I join the "Choir Invisible" it's going to be one hell of a garage sale!
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Re: Anyone still shoot Super8 film?

PostBy: Richard S. On: Sun Dec 30, 2007 1:24 am

You can get that look with digital but you'll pay for it, you need a progressive cam that shoots 24p. From there some have onbaord filters or you can apply it with software during editing. There's a few for virtualdub to reproduce it but you won't get the right look without the progressive 24fps.

Wood'nCoal wrote:I also have the 4 socket light bar,


I can remember being blinded by that thing Christmas morning, "Come on down kids and open your presents"... then dad turns on the sun in the house. :lol: Half our Christmas pictures are of kids squinting. :P
Richard S.
 
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Re: Anyone still shoot Super8 film?

PostBy: europachris On: Sun Dec 30, 2007 9:45 am

Yes, indeed, Super 8 is still available, and get this - up until a few years ago (last time I shot any Super 8) you could get the film developed at Wal-Mart. Just drop it in the package and mark "Super 8mm film, Process K-14" and it would come back in about 10 days all done. I have a few rolls yet in the freezer I'll have to thaw out and see what happens. If you search the web, there are quite a few suppliers of Super 8 film and developing yet. I guess it's used quite a bit in film schools still, but I don't know what sort of cameras are available anymore new. For a while there were a few Russian ones available. Kodak even just released a new filmstock in Super 8!

I did that with the Christmas thing a few years ago. Had the camera, the light, etc. and blinded everyone for Christmas morning. Best part - the film turned out really good and of course, had that "authentic" vintage look to it! What fun.

I have a Ansco ST/90, Yashica Electro, and Canon 310XL cameras, and a Eumig 604 projector that is REALLY heavy and very nice.
europachris
 
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Re: Anyone still shoot Super8 film?

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Sun Dec 30, 2007 11:09 am

Now you've got me thinking about film again. Like I don't have enough to do now!
Is your Yashika an Electro AX? Thats the one I have. At the time the Nikon F was the Cadillac of 35 mm cameras. I couldn't afford one, so I went with the Yashika. I've shot some really great pictures with it. I will use one of the C-3's every so often. Of course then I need to use an exposure meter for outdoor shots. Anyone else know how to do that? The only problem is I really can't take indoor photos with them because they are not set up for an electronic flash. I wonder if flashbulbs are still available anywhere....

http://arguscg.tripod.com/

I remember seeing some "old guys" at car shows and such using C-3's as recently as the 1980's.
Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
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Re: Anyone still shoot Super8 film?

PostBy: europachris On: Sun Dec 30, 2007 12:38 pm

Wood'nCoal wrote:Now you've got me thinking about film again. Like I don't have enough to do now!
Is your Yashika an Electro AX? Thats the one I have. At the time the Nikon F was the Cadillac of 35 mm cameras. I couldn't afford one, so I went with the Yashika. I've shot some really great pictures with it. I will use one of the C-3's every so often. Of course then I need to use an exposure meter for outdoor shots. Anyone else know how to do that? The only problem is I really can't take indoor photos with them because they are not set up for an electronic flash. I wonder if flashbulbs are still available anywhere....

http://arguscg.tripod.com/

I remember seeing some "old guys" at car shows and such using C-3's as recently as the 1980's.


I'll have to look what model my Yashica is, but it's not still, it's Super 8. My still camera is a Canon FTbN.
europachris
 
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Re: Anyone still shoot Super8 film?

PostBy: Richard S. On: Mon Dec 31, 2007 12:48 am

europachris wrote: I have a pretty high-end Panasonic digital (tape) camcorder, last of the single CCD models before the 3 CCD units became popular. It has very good low-light performance and really sharp video.


I had meant to comment on this before. There's a few but they are few and far between. Some of the older single CCD's have very large censors which work better under low light conditions than some of the then new small 3 CCD's. Take them out in the light and compare though. ;)

Prosumer 3 CCD''s perform very well, here's sample from my Canon GL2. big difference with manual adjustments:
Richard S.
 
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Re: Anyone still shoot Super8 film?

PostBy: europachris On: Mon Dec 31, 2007 10:45 am

Richard S. wrote:I had meant to comment on this before. There's a few but they are few and far between. Some of the older single CCD's have very large censors which work better under low light conditions than some of the then new small 3 CCD's. Take them out in the light and compare though. ;)

Prosumer 3 CCD''s perform very well, here's sample from my Canon GL2. big difference with manual adjustments:


I read all the reviews of the 3 CCD units that were coming out, even the 3 CCD version of the Panasonic I have, and all complained about the poor low light performance. Since a lot of my shooting would be indoors in poor lighting (kid learning to walk, etc.) I went with the single, large CCD unit. I also got a screaming deal from B&H Photo on mine on closeout. It's a PV-DV852D model.

Next camera I buy will be a prosumer HD capable unit, probably a Canon. They are very nice. By that time, tape will be obsolete and who knows what the technology will be!
europachris
 
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Re: Anyone still shoot Super8 film?

PostBy: Richard S. On: Tue Jan 01, 2008 3:53 am

It's true about the low light performance when they first came out but currently most 3ccd's will outperform any single ccd now. They don't even make single ccd's anymore AFAIK. New technology at the time so it's granted there is going to be problems.

europachris wrote:. By that time, tape will be obsolete and who knows what the technology will be!


Most record to mini DV tape. ;) Until flash cards become really cheap tape is here to stay. $3 for 14 gigs of storage is hard to beat, mini-dv tapes have so far stood the test of time so reliability is not an issue for at least 10 years.
Richard S.
 
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Re: Anyone still shoot Super8 film?

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Tue Jan 01, 2008 12:24 pm

Wood'nCoal wrote: I will use one of the C-3's every so often. Of course then I need to use an exposure meter for outdoor shots. Anyone else know how to do that? The only problem is I really can't take indoor photos with them because they are not set up for an electronic flash. I wonder if flashbulbs are still available anywhere....

http://arguscg.tripod.com/

I remember seeing some "old guys" at car shows and such using C-3's as recently as the 1980's.


A quick Google search shows that flashbulbs are still available. No idea about the pricing.

http://www.flashbulbs.com/index.shtml
Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
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Re: Anyone still shoot Super8 film?

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Tue Jan 01, 2008 7:42 pm

Wood'nCoal wrote:I also collect Argus C-3 35mm cameras (the first 35mm I learned to use)



My Argus C3 collection.
3-C3'S.jpg
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Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
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