Rebuilding an Antique Perfection Heater

Rebuilding an Antique Perfection Heater

PostBy: dcrane On: Thu Jun 20, 2013 7:30 pm

Well, those of us hardcore stove guys know all to well the addiction of coal stoves & antique stoves here as well as the major costs involved saving this heritage.
I happen to find an old piece of junk oil heater at the dump in the scrape pile and thought I would make an effort to save it :D
I cannot begin to tell anyone who rebuilds stoves how enjoyable, inexpensive and easy this hobby would be for you :dancing:

I have about 4-5 hours total & $30.00 total into this beauty (including fuel, wick, etc.) and its like brand new and fully functioning once again!
I should have snapped some before pics to show you how awful this thing was, but anyways... here it is in all her glory (don't laugh to hard at the colors, this was just a fun test/trial and I had some left over gold stove paint from my 404 rebuild) :lol:
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dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: Rebuilding an Antique Perfection Heater

PostBy: franco b On: Thu Jun 20, 2013 7:44 pm

Looks good, nice job.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Rebuilding an Antique Perfection Heater

PostBy: dcrane On: Thu Jun 20, 2013 8:13 pm

franco b wrote:Looks good, nice job.


Thanks bro... It heats like crazy (Im hoping the 700% engine paint holds up :cry: )! This was just a fun job, I will now know how much heat they throw and use 1200% next time. I know ill be doing some more of these (hardest part was fixing the gear that rolls the wick). everyone start keeping your eyes pealed for these old beauties ;)
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404


Re: Rebuilding an Antique Perfection Heater

PostBy: dcrane On: Fri Jun 21, 2013 8:28 pm

OK... so I guess one thing I will add to this thread is I recommend anyone refurnishing one of these lil' beauties is use 1200+ degree paint at the top and the mid section above the burner. I've been using this 2 days now outside on the patio and on the farmers porch (helps me get through the summer waiting for burning season :lol: ) and I'm seeing clearly the 700 degree paint is taking a beating at these two key "hot spots".
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: Rebuilding an Antique Perfection Heater

PostBy: david78 On: Sat Jun 22, 2013 9:07 pm

Looks good. Will it burn any type of oil?
david78
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Fuller & Warren Splendid Oak 27
Coal Size/Type: Nut

Re: Rebuilding an Antique Perfection Heater

PostBy: dcrane On: Sun Jun 23, 2013 6:47 am

david78 wrote:Looks good. Will it burn any type of oil?


these seem to essentially work like an oil lamp or camping lantern (so im sure they would burn any type of oil), the only issue would be how much smoke that oil might give off (EXAMPLE: if you burn Tiki Torch fuel its going to smoke a lot more then 100% pure Kero). what seems to give these heaters there power to heat is a forced draft effect that you do not get with an oil lantern (This seriously amazed me the first time I fired it up :shock: ) Its essentially a mini chimney with the draft flowing through the center of the fire that allows the flame at the point of "exposed" wick to burn very hot (thereby allowing that wick to absorb oil more rapidly as it burns) and almost with a "forced" or "induced" draft affect (like you see in a stoker grate with a blower forcing this air up through the grate and very intense heat in a very small defined area). The reason why these are called "smokeless" heaters is because of this forced draft effect it allows the the burner to preform at a very high heat, so high that it burns the fuel completely (or close to it) where as with an oil lamp you cant obtain this forced draft so much of the fuel is not completely burned (hence the black smoke floating up from the flame on an oil lamp).

Hopefully that is understandable to some degree (I know other members could explain and write these concepts better than me). I will say Its been very fun for me to rebuild and discover the ingenious designs of yet another incredible product built by our great grandparents!
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404