Birch Bark Canoe

Birch Bark Canoe

PostBy: franco b On: Sat Jun 22, 2013 6:56 pm

I never had the pleasure of using one of them, but the old canvas covered canoes were close.

Here is a long video of building one of these remarkable and timeless designs that brings out just how clever the original makers were. Steel instead of stone or copper tools are used but otherwise it stays pretty close to traditional methods.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qFSjKRnUzVo
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Birch Bark Canoe

PostBy: freetown fred On: Sat Jun 22, 2013 8:18 pm

Real nice Richard. Thank you :)
freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut/Stove mix

Re: Birch Bark Canoe

PostBy: Richard S. On: Sun Jun 23, 2013 12:02 am

I'll stick with the Old Town I can throw out of a seven story building, if you're canoeing all day and there is case of beer in the canoe *censored* happens. LOL
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite


Re: Birch Bark Canoe

PostBy: Freddy On: Sun Jun 23, 2013 6:18 am

That's a wonderful film. My Dad would say it was designed during the days of iron men & wooden ships. How true!
Freddy
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 130 (pea)
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Reading piece o' junk in the barn (rice)
Coal Size/Type: Pea size, Superior, deep mined

Re: Birch Bark Canoe

PostBy: franco b On: Sun Jun 23, 2013 11:35 am

Whether built in the old style or of fiberglass or aluminum the mystique remains of a design probably more than a thousand years old and still a classic that is unsurpassed for use on lakes and protected bodies of water. It can even handle some pretty rough water as on long Island Sound. Fitted with a pair of sails and lee boards it could really step out.

The kayak is another great design but not very good as a cargo carrier as in camping. There is just nothing that equals a canoe in its connection with the past and the spirituality that went into its design and construction.

The Shakers believed that their work was a form of worship and along the way they invented the circular saw and furniture styles that are unsurpassed and appeal to something deep inside us. I believe that the canoe was born with that same quality of reverence. What could be more audacious than setting out to build a boat with nothing but sticks and bark with stone tools to work them and having it come out so well.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Birch Bark Canoe

PostBy: Richard S. On: Sun Jun 23, 2013 3:41 pm

franco b wrote:Whether built in the old style or of fiberglass or aluminum the mystique remains of a design probably more than a thousand years old


People don't realize there is differences in canoes and just how well built it is, the shape is an important factor. My Buddies all had Coleman. Me and my canoeing partner had a Old Town and that was like comparing a Ferrari to a Bug. We 'd just be cruising along and they would be struggling to keep up. LOL... That gets old after 8 days.
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

Re: Birch Bark Canoe

PostBy: franco b On: Sun Jun 23, 2013 4:32 pm

Surprised at such a dramatic difference if the canoes were the same size. I would like to have seen the paddlers switched to confirm it was the canoe design. I never had the experience to compare head to head. I did also like the Grumman aluminum.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Birch Bark Canoe

PostBy: Richard S. On: Sun Jun 23, 2013 5:10 pm

franco b wrote:Surprised at such a dramatic difference if the canoes were the same size. I would like to have seen the paddlers switched to confirm it was the canoe design. I never had the experience to compare head to head. I did also like the Grumman aluminum.


I may have exaggerated the difference with my comparison but there is a difference. Those Colemans are pretty much flat bottomed and a little wider, there isn't a whole lot slope on the front or back. The Old Town is more rounded. The composite was less prone to damage too so I'd image that made it a little bit more hydrodynamic.

Image
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

Re: Birch Bark Canoe

PostBy: hcarlow On: Sun Jun 23, 2013 6:08 pm

Very nice video , I built 2 cedar strip canoes many years ago and I thought that was quite a project . The cedar strips were 1/2 inch wide by 1/4 thick . I tounge and grooved mine just for a better fit , I don't know of anyone else ever going to all that bother . I built the 16 ft . mold from plans I sent away for . I fiberglassed both the inside and out so it was very rugged and with the woven seats was quite pretty if I must say so myself . I can't tell you how many hours it took to build them now but it was many . I looked for some pictures but couldn't find any right off .
hcarlow
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Leisure Line WL 110