Glenwood Baseburners # 6 and #8

Re: Glenwood Baseburners # 6 and #8

PostBy: wsherrick On: Tue Aug 06, 2013 6:44 pm

The various types of coal stoves are listed and described briefly below. All turn of the century coal stoves are cylindrical. Even the small franklin heaters like my Stanley Argand are cylindrical. All wood stoves from this time period are boxes. So it is easy to tell a wood stove from a coal stove. Now certain coal stoves were designed to be able to burn wood also, but; as a secondary fuel, these are also cylindrical. It can be confusing to some one just becoming acquainted with stoves and the terminology that goes with them.

Oak Stoves. Oak stoves are extremely common and most all manufacturers made them. An Oak stove is by definition a direct draft stove. That is the combustion air comes in at the bottom under the grate and the exhaust goes straight out of the top. These were designed to be able to burn anything. They vary greatly in quality and levels of craftsmanship. Most of the economy stoves are oak stoves, however; the top of the line oaks are quite superior. You just have to know what you are looking at.
There are two basic variations of the oak stove design. One is the type that has an indirect back pipe option applied to it for the burning of coal. These on the outside look just like base heaters, but; they are still oaks. These back pipes have a divider down the inside center of them to direct the exhaust gasses in a downward, then upward "U", direction of flow to increase the radiant surface area of the stove. These back pipes make the stove quite effective and efficient at coal burning, but; differ from a base heater as a base heater has a much longer and more involved heat exchange system in it.

The second variation of an Oak stove are those that fall under the, "hot blast," category. These are extremely well designed stoves that are designed for Bituminous coal as their primary fuel. Bituminous coal has radically different combustion characteristics than Anthracite. These stoves supply super heated secondary air just above the fire bed to burn the large amount of hydrocarbon gas that is released from Bituminous Coal. In fact most of the heat value in Bituminous is found in the hydrocarbon and if these are not efficiently burned the heat value is totally lost and all you get is a bunch of smoke and soot build up.

There are basically three types of base heaters or (base burners) These two terms are interchangeable and lead to confusion. There are however, large differences in the various designs of base heaters. What they all have in common is that they are all made to burn Anthracite Coal as their principal fuel. In fact the only base heaters that can get away with burning wood in them are the types like the Glenwood 6's and 8's. There are many other foundries that made this design of stove as well. They are all fairly similar in design and construction. These are an advancement of the Oak stove design with the edition of the base heating element. These are recognized by having the base heating tubes on the EXTERIOR rear of the stove and the exhaust port about 1/3 of the way between the top of the fire pot and the top of the stove. The exhaust goes out of the rear opening outside of the stove, then down under the ash pit, then back out side into a parallel tube to then exit.

The next type is the MICA BASE BURNER. These are strictly Anthracite heaters. Burning wood in these destroys them. These were termed. "Radiant," stoves because the front and sides are made of mica windows to allow a far greater amount of the direct radiant heat of the fire to escape into the surrounding area. The base heating exhaust path can be quite complex on some of these stoves. Some of them had triple pipe heat exchangers on them. Many of these stoves also have what is called a, "double heating," feature on them. What this means is that the stove has an internal plenum that makes hot air like a furnace as well as provides radiant heat.

The third design is those base heaters that have an internally suspended fire pot. These stoves are also for Anthracite Only. This type of stove is unique in its design. It is the only stove ever made that has a fire pot that is insulated from heat loss by the fire's own hot exhaust gasses. The hot exhaust in these stoves GOES AROUND the fire pot and the actual fire itself before they descend down into the bottom of the stove, circulate, then exit up a back pipe in the rear of the stove to exit. These stoves are common in smaller sizes. They made big ones two but they don't seem to be as common for some reason. I have one of the largest types of this design. An Our Glenwood No 13. This stove holds a 100 pounds of coal. These are fairly rare however.

I hope this clears up some of the confusion. If you want more information just ask.
wsherrick
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: None
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: None
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: None
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Glenwood Baseburners # 6 and #8

PostBy: franco b On: Tue Aug 06, 2013 7:42 pm

I was hoping William would answer and he did.

The best way to determine what heat you need is to extrapolate from how much fuel you burn now. Then use the fuel comparison calculator at the top of this page.

Ash will be from 10 to 12 percent by weight but will look like more because it is fluffed up and not as dense as the coal.

50 pounds of coal is two coal scuttles full and any more if lugged up stairs becomes drudgery fast. Like over 100 pounds of wood.

My guess is that the no. 6 holds 40 pounds and the 8, 60 pounds, but it is a guess.

Central coal heating systems came into vogue because they distribute the heat better and kept the mess in the basement. They are not as efficient as a good parlor stove because they have distribution losses as well as radiant losses to the basement and most had crap for fire boxes. So for equal heat in the room the parlor stove is more efficient but can't distribute it as well.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Glenwood Baseburners # 6 and #8

PostBy: Gary1 On: Thu Aug 08, 2013 6:12 pm

To wsherrick and franco,

William, thanks for your excellent and concise explanation of the various stoves. I apprciate both the time you put into it as well as the info. It clears up the questions I had.

Franco, I appreciate your help as well. Based on the fuel comparison calculator, I would need about 6 tons of coal for the entire heating season. This equal to about 66 lbs of coal per day if I only used the stove for 6 months, November thru April. Most likely I'd use the furnace for the shoulder months. When its 45-50 degrees out my furnace hardly comes on, and I probably don't use more than 100 gallons of oil per month. I don't mind the work carrying and loading coal. I currently cut a little over a cord of wood per year for the fireplace, and split it by hand in the basement with a 12" cold chisel and a 3 lb sludge hammer. So, what do you think, a Glenwood 6 or an 8? By the way, I've seen specs on the 6 which says they're 24" x 24" and 48" to the top of the cook top and 61" to the top of the finial. How much bigger, physically, is the 8?

If I put the stove in the kitchen I'd have the stove pipe going up thru the ceiling, thru the spare bedroom, 2' from the wall, into the attic and out the roof. In all I'd need about 35' of piping. Is it possible to have a bend in the pipe in the attic so that it would be closer to the peak of the roof where it comes out, to cut down on the height of the pipe that sticks out the roof? If not, it would come out about 8' to 9' feet horizontally from the peak and probably be about 7' tall. The roof has a 9 pitch. Any suggestions on who I could call to come out and take a look at the job?

Who do you get your coal from and what's it going for per ton?

Thanks again for all your help...Gary
Gary1
 


Re: Glenwood Baseburners # 6 and #8

PostBy: franco b On: Thu Aug 08, 2013 8:15 pm

Remember 66 pounds of coal per day is an average and on the really cold days you would need more and milder days less. The no. 6 could probably handle 66 pound but would be pushing it a bit. Pushing it means shorter tending times and you probably would have to empty the ash pan twice. The no. 8 would be more comfortable and that is what William recommended. I don't know if the flue on the no. 8 is still 6 inch, I think it is. My guess is 26 x 26 footprint. The net size of the fire pot diameters are two inches smaller because of the brick lining. On really cold days those outlying rooms could get pretty cold and could probably use some supplementation from the central system.

There are 15 and 30 degree elbow offsets available for the chimney(Selkirk). The height of attic space would determine how much offset was possible. They will also make it harder to push a cleaning brush through but will allow you to offset from one side or the other to clear a roof rafter. Going up and out through the house will make for the best draft. 316 alloy is recommended as being more durable. I don't know of any installers. The local stove stores usually will do chimney installations. Bring the big wallet.

I am in CT. and have just paid 285 per ton for 3.6 tons plus 70 delivery for Blaschak bagged.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Glenwood Baseburners # 6 and #8

PostBy: Gary1 On: Fri Aug 09, 2013 4:37 pm

Hi Franco,

Thanks for the info. Do you know what size flues the Glenwood 6 and the 8 use? Can you please explain what maintenance is required on these coal stoves and their pipes or flues? I thought that because they don't create creosote that there would be little or no maintenance involved, but apparently this isn't so. Thanks, Gary
Gary1
 

Re: Glenwood Baseburners # 6 and #8

PostBy: franco b On: Fri Aug 09, 2013 6:45 pm

Gary1 wrote:Hi Franco,

Thanks for the info. Do you know what size flues the Glenwood 6 and the 8 use? Can you please explain what maintenance is required on these coal stoves and their pipes or flues? I thought that because they don't create creosote that there would be little or no maintenance involved, but apparently this isn't so. Thanks, Gary

Though there is no creosote or risk of chimney fire there is still fly ash which clings to the stove pipe and chimney. Every time you shake down the stove bits of this very fine ash floats up the chimney. With the stove off for the summer the humidity combines with the ash to form a corrosive mixture and if ignored for years can even get like cement. So the stove, smoke pipe and chimney should be brushed down once a year.

The picture is of the fire pot of my Glenwood Modern Oak 114. The bricks are probably original and what looks like erosion of the brick is really bits of hardened ash at least partially caused from leaving ash over the summer.

The Glenwood 6 has 6 inch pipe and I think the 8 has also but I am not sure.
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franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Glenwood Baseburners # 6 and #8

PostBy: Gary1 On: Fri Aug 09, 2013 10:35 pm

Franco,

Thanks for the info. I found out the Glenwood 8 has a 6'' pipe. I didn't realize you had a Glenwood. I thought you had a Franco Belge, which I understand are a high quality stove. Good night...Gary
Gary1