Ash pan sizing

Ash pan sizing

PostBy: anthony7812 On: Mon Jul 29, 2013 4:35 pm

Its 2013 and I have yet to find a modern handfired stove that has an ashpan area larger than the grates. Is thier a stove on the market that is designed in such a way. Any thoughts comments?
anthony7812
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: VanWert VA 400
Coal Size/Type: Buck/Nut/Anthracite

Re: Ash pan sizing

PostBy: freetown fred On: Mon Jul 29, 2013 5:01 pm

With my Hitzer 50-93--In season, I tend every 12 hrs & empty the ash pan either every 24 or 36 hrs. Remember Anthony, hand fired take more work then any of them girly-guy stoves---BUT--no problem with power outages which I have out here pretty often, they burn damn near anything. I personally have no problem with tending to the ash pan, but my disposal method keeps me real close to the house. Hell, I just make a pile in one of the flower beds & tend to the actual spreading, filling holes, etc. come spring. Not hard to do all that out here plus I've got a 1 ton dump, my large lawn tractor or 8N tractor & a roller to simplify the task. PS, by the way very few ashes miss the ash pan, I'm just careful to set it in the right place. With my stove, it's as far to the left as I can get.:) My only far to the left venture! :clap: toothy
freetown fred
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut/Stove mix

Re: Ash pan sizing

PostBy: Lightning On: Mon Jul 29, 2013 5:23 pm

I dump my ash pan at every tending into a 30 gallon galvanized steel trash can. Then I leave the ash pan out of the furnace during the burn so radiant heat can warm the bottom of the fire box to increase surface area for heat transfer that would other wise be insulated by a layer of ash sitting in an ash pan there.

I'm not sure why you would want a huge ash pan on a stove. :?
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Stove Size Mix

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Re: Ash pan sizing

PostBy: nortcan On: Mon Jul 29, 2013 7:00 pm

The larger the ash pan is the better it is :) .
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Ash pan sizing

PostBy: nortcan On: Mon Jul 29, 2013 7:02 pm

The larger the ash pan is the better it is :) .
Vermont Castings Vigll has one of the best ash pan system.
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Ash pan sizing

PostBy: franco b On: Mon Jul 29, 2013 8:08 pm

Most stoves could have larger ash pans. The larger pan allows for once a day dumping.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Ash pan sizing

PostBy: 2001Sierra On: Mon Jul 29, 2013 8:15 pm

My old Buderus 3115 needed to be emptied twice a day, as it needed to be shaken at least the same time. 1980 vintage German made stove.
2001Sierra
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90 Chimney vent
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Other Heating: Buderus Oil Boiler 3115-34
Stove/Furnace Model: Keystoker 90 Chimney Vent

Re: Ash pan sizing

PostBy: wsherrick On: Mon Jul 29, 2013 11:39 pm

The large ash pan is one of the things I really like about the Glenwood No 6. Under normal firing rates I can go two days between emptying it. When I really have it cranked up it falls to once daily. The other good thing is all of the ashes fall into the pan. There is no spillage.
This Crawford 40 I am going to try in the living room this year also has an extremely large ash pan, so it should also be able to go for at least a full 24 hours before it needs to be dumped.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Ash pan sizing

PostBy: franco b On: Tue Jul 30, 2013 10:23 am

wsherrick wrote:The large ash pan is one of the things I really like about the Glenwood No 6. Under normal firing rates I can go two days between emptying it. When I really have it cranked up it falls to once daily. The other good thing is all of the ashes fall into the pan. There is no spillage.
This Crawford 40 I am going to try in the living room this year also has an extremely large ash pan, so it should also be able to go for at least a full 24 hours before it needs to be dumped.

What is the range in pounds of coal per day that you feel that stove uses comfortably without overheating on the high end and holding the fire on the low end? My guess is 20 pounds on the low end and about 60 pounds on the high. Also on the low end do you still use the base heater position since draft will be lower? Obviously that will depend on a good chimney as well.

Not looking for extremes but just that area where the stove is at its best both in burning and ease of tending. That sweet spot.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Ash pan sizing

PostBy: wsherrick On: Tue Jul 30, 2013 4:51 pm

franco b wrote:
wsherrick wrote:The large ash pan is one of the things I really like about the Glenwood No 6. Under normal firing rates I can go two days between emptying it. When I really have it cranked up it falls to once daily. The other good thing is all of the ashes fall into the pan. There is no spillage.
This Crawford 40 I am going to try in the living room this year also has an extremely large ash pan, so it should also be able to go for at least a full 24 hours before it needs to be dumped.

What is the range in pounds of coal per day that you feel that stove uses comfortably without overheating on the high end and holding the fire on the low end? My guess is 20 pounds on the low end and about 60 pounds on the high. Also on the low end do you still use the base heater position since draft will be lower? Obviously that will depend on a good chimney as well.

Not looking for extremes but just that area where the stove is at its best both in burning and ease of tending. That sweet spot.


I rarely ever run either stove in direct draft except when starting and reloading them. The small Glenwood has totally different characteristics than the big No 6. The little one is extremely miserly in consuming coal. It is the most economical stove I have ever owned. It likes a temperature of around 300-350 and that will use just about roughly 40 pounds (a little less than two level standard scuttle fulls) for two straight days. On the low end it will burn 10 pounds a day. Just a couple of scoops and it will maintain an extremely low fire. I've never seen another type of stove able to do that. Including the big stove. Keeping with the subject here; the ash pan on the little No 9 is small and it must be emptied daily. It produces, however; enough ash to fill a large coffee can. Not much at all. The ash is all fine powder, no granular waste in it whatsoever.

The big No 6 likes to run at around 450 and it takes about 40-50 pounds in a day to produce that constantly over a 24 hour period. I estimate the weight by guessing that a regular scuttle of coal is about 25 pounds. Once you have a fully established fire, the stove all warmed up, etc. It takes on average 1and 1/2 scuttles per day. At 500 degrees it will take two & 1/3 per day. I never need to run it any hotter than that. I run both stoves by monitoring the stack temps. It's optimal at 400- 450 on the barrel and 110 on the stack about 2 feet from the exhaust collar. Not too shabby.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Ash pan sizing

PostBy: franco b On: Tue Jul 30, 2013 5:48 pm

Thanks very much for real world numbers where the stoves are at their best rather than pushed to extremes where they never were intended to be by the maker.

Very gratified by your experience with the number 9 which takes insulating the fire box to the next level without sacrificing heat exchange in the overall stove. Will be good to see if the larger fire box of the Crawford will match that performance as I think it will but with higher output.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Ash pan sizing

PostBy: anthony7812 On: Tue Jul 30, 2013 7:54 pm

It's not so much as ash quantity the pan can hold, it's about not having the ash pan wide enough to cover under all the grate area. Don't understand why any manufacturers figured it out yet.
anthony7812
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: VanWert VA 400
Coal Size/Type: Buck/Nut/Anthracite

Re: Ash pan sizing

PostBy: wsherrick On: Tue Jul 30, 2013 8:12 pm

They had it figured out a 100 years ago. All of my stoves have an ash pan area that is larger than the grate above it.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Ash pan sizing

PostBy: lsayre On: Tue Jul 30, 2013 9:29 pm

wsherrick wrote:They had it figured out a 100 years ago. All of my stoves have an ash pan area that is larger than the grate above it.


How could such common sense have vanished in our modern world?
lsayre
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AHS S130 Coal Gun
Coal Size/Type: Stockton Anthracite Pea
Other Heating: Resistance Boiler (13 KW)

Re: Ash pan sizing

PostBy: stovepipemike On: Wed Jul 31, 2013 7:48 am

I have figured out how so much common sense has vanished from the modern world.They have figured out that in manufacture it costs extra money in some cases to do the practical thing.That extra money comes out of the bottom line and of course,nobody wants that to happen. Mike
stovepipemike
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: KAA-2

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