Need advise on new stove

Re: Need advise on new stove

PostBy: gunloader55 On: Wed Aug 21, 2013 9:45 pm

Whats the difference between the oak and cylinder style base heaters? Is it just looks or function I know one has oven is there anything that makes one better.

Thanks Guys
gunloader55
 
Stove/Furnace Model: Glenwood 6 & wm 414a

Re: Need advise on new stove

PostBy: wsherrick On: Tue Aug 27, 2013 3:32 pm

The principal difference in the two designs lay in how the fire pot is configured and the flame path for the exhaust gasses. The Oak type Base Heaters are designed to be dual fuel if necessary. They are designed for coal, but; if you have a register plate, then you can burn wood in them if you have to. If you read the advertising literature for them they state that the removable register plate is for the, "temporary," burning of wood. Some people like to use wood in the early fall and spring for short term fires just to knock the chill off of the house. Some, like the Glenwood 6's and *'s have an air ring on the top of the fire pot to provide heated secondary air. This is a really nice feature for any fuel that is used for the stove.
On my Glenwood No 6, you can see the heated secondary air igniting the flammable gas as it emerges from a fresh batch of coal. It provides a ring of blue flames that looks just like a burner on a gas stove.
The flame path on these is EXTERIOR to the combustion chamber and the entire barrel of the stove itself. The exhaust gas is taken to the rear of the stove outside then down below the ash pit before it exits out of the stove pipe.
The other design is NOT FOR MULTI FUEL USE. It id designed just for Anthracite only as its fuel and the design reflects that purpose. The principal design advantage to these stoves is that the fire pot is suspended internally inside the outer barrel of the stove and the exhaust gasses are directed, INSIDE THE STOVE DOWN BETWEEN THE FIRE POT AND THE OUTER STOVE BARREL. This is perhaps the most brilliant application of stove engineering that I can think of. The reason is that the stove reconciles the basic conflict between thermal efficiency (actual useable heat versus heat lost by escape up the flue) and combustion efficiency (heat value lost from the fuel itself because of an imperfect environment for good combustion).
Without a super long explanation of combustion theory and heat transfer theory, it boils down to this. In most applications, good combustion is obtained by a loss of thermal efficiency and an increase in thermal efficiency comes at the cost of good combustion efficiency.
This conflict in efficiency is created by the combustion of the fuel and the radiation of heat out into the room happening in the same place. A really hot fire with good combustion sends a lot of the heat up the chimney and a cool fire in which most of the heat is radiated into the room causes a lot of fuel to not be burned and the unburned gasses are lost up the chimney. The ideal situation is where the combustion and radiating processes are separate from each other. The purpose of all base burners is to accomplish this highly desirable goal.
This design of base heater solves this issue by insulating the fire pot from heat loss by having the hot gasses go around the fire pot and therefore maintaining a high, stable temperature of the fire bed. This allows for the coal to be burned a lot more completely. Now instead of having this heat lost up the chimney there are the long heat exchange passages that come AFTER the heat has left the combustion area to be radiated out into the room.
So you get the best of both.
Now as to which is better, that depends on what you need or want. The Wings Best stove you have decided on is a superlative stove. It is almost identical to a Glenwood 6. It will serve you well and deliver extremely high efficiency ratings for you.
I hope this helps with your question.
Last edited by wsherrick on Tue Aug 27, 2013 3:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
wsherrick
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: None
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: None
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: None
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Need advise on new stove

PostBy: dcrane On: Tue Aug 27, 2013 3:51 pm

wsherrick wrote:The principal difference in the two designs lay in how the fire pot is configured and the flame path for the exhaust gasses. The Oak type Base Heaters are designed to be dual fuel if necessary. They are designed for coal, but; if you have a register plate, then you can burn wood in them if you have to. If you read the advertising literature for them they state that the removable register plate is for the, "temporary," burning of wood. Some people like to use wood in the early fall and spring for short term fires just to knock the chill off of the house. Some, like the Glenwood 6's and *'s have an air ring on the top of the fire pot to provide heated secondary air. This is a really nice feature for any fuel that is used for the stove.
On my Glenwood No 6, you can see the heated secondary air igniting the flammable gas as it emerges from a fresh batch of coal. It provides a ring of blue flames that looks just like a burner on a gas stove.
The flame path on these is EXTERIOR to the combustion chamber and the entire barrel of the stove itself. The exhaust gas is taken to the rear of the stove outside then down below the ash pit before it exits out of the stove pipe.
The other design is NOT FOR MULTI FUEL USE. It id designed just for Anthracite only as its fuel and the design reflects that purpose. The principal design advantage to these stoves is that the fire pot is suspended internally inside the outer barrel of the stove and the exhaust gasses are directed, INSIDE THE STOVE DOWN BETWEEN THE FIRE POT AND THE OUTER STOVE BARREL. This is perhaps the most brilliant application of stove engineering that I can think of. The reason is that the stove reconciles the basic conflict between thermal efficiency (actual useable heat versus heat lost by escape up the flue) and combustion efficiency (heat value lost from the fuel itself because of an imperfect environment for good combustion).
Without a super long explanation of combustion theory and heat transfer theory, it boils down to this. In most applications, good combustion is obtained by a loss of thermal efficiency and an increase in thermal efficiency comes at the cost of good combustion efficiency.
This design of base heater solves this issue by insulating the fire pot from heat loss by having the hot gasses go around the fire pot and therefore maintaining a high, stable temperature of the fire bed. This allows for the coal to be burnt a lot more completely. Now instead of having this heat lost up the chimney there is the long heat exchange passages that come AFTER the heat has left the combustion area to be radiated out into the room.
So you get the best of both.
Now as to which is better, that depends on what you need or want. The Wings Best stove you have decided on is a superlative stove. It is almost identical to a Glenwood 6. It will serve you well and deliver extremely high efficiency ratings for you.
I hope this helps with your question.


Freeeking brilliant explanation!!! it only takes most of us years & decades off or life to learn what William just explained. I'll add one lil' extra benefit to this type baseheater "INSIDE THE STOVE DOWN BETWEEN THE FIRE POT AND THE OUTER STOVE BARREL" ... A coal bed REQUIRES a minimum temp. to maintain a coal fire (this MIN. temp is achieved much easier because the hot gasses are rerouted around the firebrick/combustion chamber)... so it allows you to maintain a VERY VERY low temp. coal fire in this type of stove (which in essence means you don't need to burn wood in the fall and spring). That's why we never seem to find any Glenwood 6, 8 or Our Glenwoods on any showroom floors (they pre sell before ever getting their :mad: )
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404


Re: Need advise on new stove

PostBy: davidmcbeth3 On: Sat Sep 07, 2013 12:24 am

gunloader55 wrote:Thanks for the input,I guess my biggest question about handfired stove is being able to run at low fire on warmer days.What would be my best bet for a manual stove with hopper?Stove will be main heat will only use use oil as backup.Is there a good stove that will run on the warmer days without going out? And where is good place to buy bagged or loose coal that will bring to NC, want to buy in bulk want 20-30 ton.Thanks


I familiar with the weather in your neck of the woods ... and you can have a stove just sit and almost appear as if its not burning at all with the stove top at about 160°F ... control the air intake and draft ...

You should have no problem but being a newbie ... get a IR Temp. gun ... if the temp gets below 160°F .. open 'er up a bit....you do not want a full stove to peter out.

And 20-30 tons? For your 1600 sq ft house? That may just last 10 years ...
davidmcbeth3
 
Coal Size/Type: nut/pea/anthra
Stove/Furnace Make: Hitzer
Stove/Furnace Model: 503