Questions about stoveplacement/setup

Questions about stoveplacement/setup

PostBy: Gary1 On: Sun Aug 18, 2013 2:36 pm

Hi,

Before I begin I'd like to mention that I noticed, by chance, that on July 21st and 22nd a few of you responded to my original post of July 11th, asking if I selected a stove yet. When someone responds days or weeks later is there a way that I can be made aware of it or do I just have to search all of my posts periodically? I thought my son mentioned that I'd receive an email each time someone responds, but I haven't. If you look at my post of July 28th, entitled Glenwood Baseheater #6 and #8 you'll see toward the end some very informative conversations I had with wsherrick, franco b, and norcan, to whom I am grateful.

I'm interested in a Glenwood #8 and would like to place it in my kitchen. As mentioned previously, I'm very limited as to where it could go because of the chimney placement. It would be in front of a sheetrocked wall that's a little over 4 feet wide. To the left of the wall, and parallel with it is the back staircase going upstairs. To the right of the wall in a hallway. How far out from the center of the wall should the stove be? Also, it would be about 2 to 3 feet away from the wood staircase. Without adding humidity to the room would the heat from the stove dry out and loosen or warp the handrailing, ballisters, or steps? Does anything have to be done to the sheetrocked wall? There's an electrical outlet on the wall about 14" up from the floor. On the other side of the wall, which is where the cellar staircase is, I have the emergency shut off switches for my furnaces and hot water heater. I don't want the stove to be too far out from the wall because the stove pipe going up thru the kitchen ceiling would go thru the spare bedroom and I'd like to keep it as close to the bedroom wall as possible. The ceiling in the attic is about 12' high. I'd like to use two 30 degree elbows to get the piping over as close to the peak of the roof as possible before going thru the roof to cut down on the amount of piping sticking out of the roof. How long can the piping that goes between the 2 elbows be? The total length of the piping would be about 35' without the elbow arrangement.

I have a ceramic tile floor in the kitchen which is set in a mud job, as opposed to being glued to the plywood. Weight of the stove is not problem because I placed my floor joists 12" on center instead of the usual 16" when I built the house.

Once again I look forward to your responses. Thank you...Gary
Gary1
 

Re: Questions about stoveplacement/setup

PostBy: Lightning On: Sun Aug 18, 2013 2:41 pm

Upper right hand corner of the screen, click on active. This will give you a list of the most recent threads that have been posted on starting with the most recent at the top :D Any threads that you have created or posted on will be marked with a red astricks. Hope this helps.
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash

Re: Questions about stoveplacement/setup

PostBy: Gary1 On: Sun Aug 18, 2013 5:37 pm

Thanks Lightning...Gary
Gary1
 


Re: Questions about stoveplacement/setup

PostBy: DePippo79 On: Sun Aug 18, 2013 5:46 pm

I usually get the emails. Go to user control panel and board preferences and see if you have your account set up so you can receive emails. Hope you get the no. 8 nice stove. Matt
DePippo79
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Oak 40
Coal Size/Type: Stove, nut/anthracite

Re: Questions about stoveplacement/setup

PostBy: Gary1 On: Sun Aug 18, 2013 6:52 pm

Matt,

Thanks for the info. I like your dog. My wife and I have been married for 33 years and we've had two dogs all that time, up until recently...Gary
Gary1
 

Re: Questions about stoveplacement/setup

PostBy: DePippo79 On: Sun Aug 18, 2013 7:00 pm

Thank you, he's a good boy great with my 2 and 4 year old. Take care. Matt
DePippo79
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Oak 40
Coal Size/Type: Stove, nut/anthracite

Re: Questions about stoveplacement/setup

PostBy: franco b On: Sun Aug 18, 2013 10:12 pm

The elbows can support 15 feet of pipe (Selkirk) so that is plenty safe.

You will have to put up a wall shield of sheet metal spaced 1 inch from wall. It can be painted to match whatever. That will let you get to about 9 inches with the smoke pipe.

Banister will get warm at 3 feet, but I don't think any more harm than very low humidity you will already have.

Between the back pipe and a smoke pipe elbow these stoves stick out a lot at the back, so hard to get close to wall. A stove that exits out the stove top can get closer (by about a foot) but other than a new stove I can't think of an antique base burner that does that. Many non base burners or heaters do that (top exit) and it might be a consideration with a 35 foot interior chimney.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Questions about stoveplacement/setup

PostBy: McGiever On: Sun Aug 18, 2013 10:22 pm

Gary1 wrote: The ceiling in the attic is about 12' high. I'd like to use two 30 degree elbows to get the piping over as close to the peak of the roof as possible before going thru the roof to cut down on the amount of piping sticking out of the roof. How long can the piping that goes between the 2 elbows be? The total length of the piping would be about 35' without the elbow arrangement. Thank you...Gary


To answer the piping length between the 30* elbows question...

The center to center measurement between the 2 30* elbows will 2X (2 times) the offset distance measurement.

Example: Offset distance desired= 36"....then, center to center of 30* elbows will measure 72" (2x36=72)

Note: If using 45* elbows...the center to center measurement between the 2 45* elbows will 1.414X (1.414 times) the offset distance measurement.
:secret:
McGiever
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AXEMAN-ANDERSON 130 "1959"
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: HARMAN MAGNUM
Hand Fed Coal Stove: RADIANT HOME AIR BLAST
Baseburners & Antiques: OUR GLENWOOD 111 BASEBURNER "1908"
Coal Size/Type: PEA / ANTHRACITE, NUT-STOVE / ANTHRACITE
Other Heating: Ground Source Heat Pump
Stove/Furnace Make: Hydro Heat /Mega Tek

Re: Questions about stoveplacement/setup

PostBy: Gary1 On: Tue Aug 20, 2013 6:26 pm

Thanks to all of you for the info.

I recall seeing in one of wsherricks older threads that he thought that a pound of coal would produce about 1,000 BTUs. If so, I'm wondering for how long and at what temperature? This being the case, would a Glenwood #6 which holds about 40 lbs of coal produce about 40,000 BTUs and the #8 which holds 60 lbs produce 60,000BTUs?...Gary
Gary1
 

Re: Questions about stoveplacement/setup

PostBy: dcrane On: Tue Aug 20, 2013 6:44 pm

Gary1 wrote:Thanks to all of you for the info.

I recall seeing in one of wsherricks older threads that he thought that a pound of coal would produce about 1,000 BTUs. If so, I'm wondering for how long and at what temperature? This being the case, would a Glenwood #6 which holds about 40 lbs of coal produce about 40,000 BTUs and the #8 which holds 60 lbs produce 60,000BTUs?...Gary


I'm sure those 2 stoves would do that easy without even breaking a sweat (where a modern stove advertising 60,000 BTU's in most cases would be working at the peek of its ability). If you start your active searching now for one of these Baseburners you should be able to have one for next season with a little luck (One of these Glenwood Baseburners is probably not going to happen this season for you because its a job in itself just finding one available)... Unless money is no object.
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: Questions about stoveplacement/setup

PostBy: Lightning On: Tue Aug 20, 2013 7:20 pm

Gary1 wrote:Thanks to all of you for the info.

I recall seeing in one of wsherricks older threads that he thought that a pound of coal would produce about 1,000 BTUs. If so, I'm wondering for how long and at what temperature? This being the case, would a Glenwood #6 which holds about 40 lbs of coal produce about 40,000 BTUs and the #8 which holds 60 lbs produce 60,000BTUs?...Gary


Whoa.. Heres what yer looking for..... Forget about temperature for a minute, it confuses understanding the following concept.
1 pound of coal will produce roughly 12,500 BTUs - some a little more some a little less. SO in your example, 40 pounds of coal burned for 24 hours would produce roughly 21,000 BTUs per hour. (40 pounds x 12,500 per pound) divided by 24 hours = 21,000 BTUs/hour. BUT what the stove is specifically rated for is unknown by me..

Heat output ratings for stoves or other heating appliances are spoken in terms of maximum BTUs per hour. Ratings by manufactures are a little unrealistic. For example My furnace is rated for 120,000 BTUs per hour. I would never run it that hard. It may not be safe and definitely wouldn't be efficient. Mine burns at about 45,000 BTUs per hour using about 80-85 pounds per day on the coldest days of winter .
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash

Re: Questions about stoveplacement/setup

PostBy: Gary1 On: Tue Aug 20, 2013 10:21 pm

dcrane,

Thanks for your response. Yes, I know it won't be easy finding one...Gary

Lightning,

Now that I think about it, I believe wsherrick said 10,000 BTUs, not 1,000 as I stated. At any rate, you're right about the BTUs. If you want to see something interesting google: " BTUs converted to degrees of temperature ". The answer is that there is no answer. By the way, how long have you lived in Olean? I ask because I graduated from St. Bonaventure in 1965. Nice town. Take care...Gary
Gary1
 

Re: Questions about stoveplacement/setup

PostBy: Lightning On: Tue Aug 20, 2013 10:31 pm

Gary1 wrote:Now that I think about it, I believe wsherrick said 10,000 BTUs, not 1,000 as I stated. At any rate, you're right about the BTUs. If you want to see something interesting google: " BTUs converted to degrees of temperature ". The answer is that there is no answer. By the way, how long have you lived in Olean? I ask because I graduated from St. Bonaventure in 1965. Nice town. Take care...Gary


Right, that's why I wanted to take the temperature out of the equation :) 10,000 BTUs per pound would be about what you could net yield into your living area, the other 2500 BTUs would be lost elsewhere, up the chimney, bleeding out of gaps in tin duct work, or possibly spent in areas where there are uninsulated pipes in a boiler system.

Actually I grew up in Portville, graduated in 1989 from high school. I live just outside of Olean a few miles in the woods a bit :D I've been around this area pretty much all my life. I like it here 8-)
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash