Glenwood question

Glenwood question

PostBy: Dave 1234 On: Mon Sep 02, 2013 11:54 am

A friend of mine has a Glenwood 114 that appears to be in good condition. I have no experience with coal stoves,but this one is very pretty to look at.(like that matters :) )
Any info would be helpful.

Thanks, Dave.
Dave 1234
 
Stove/Furnace Make: EFM
Stove/Furnace Model: 520

Re: Glenwood question

PostBy: wsherrick On: Mon Sep 02, 2013 2:54 pm

What is it? Is it a Glenwood Modern Oak? If it is a Modern Oak then it is the smallest in the Glenwood Oak line, the largest is the 118. The number refers to the fire pot size. In this case the fire pot is 14 inches in diameter.
Perhaps we could be more helpful if you had specific questions about it. Condition means everything. Glenwood Modern Oaks are fairly common as they sold a kazillion of them between the years 1905 and 1920. These are one of the icons of the stove era.
wsherrick
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: None
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: None
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: None
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Glenwood question

PostBy: franco b On: Mon Sep 02, 2013 3:36 pm

There were several options on the stove which are nice to have. The most important are a brick lined fire pot and the back pipe to increase heat exchange surface.

Good condition would include tight fitting ash door and air inlets as well as grates in good shape and able to turn freely.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

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Re: Glenwood question

PostBy: dcrane On: Mon Sep 02, 2013 4:35 pm

New Condition = $1,500 "Pretty looking good condition"= $700
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: Glenwood question

PostBy: McGiever On: Mon Sep 02, 2013 10:08 pm

From what I hear, they came different ways...direct draft, (no back pipe) and indirect draft, (with back pipe)
Some came with no refractory lining in fire pot...others did have lining.

These differences play a part in what price a buyer is willing to pay. ;)
McGiever
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AXEMAN-ANDERSON 130 "1959"
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: HARMAN MAGNUM
Hand Fed Coal Stove: RADIANT HOME AIR BLAST
Baseburners & Antiques: OUR GLENWOOD 111 BASEBURNER "1908"
Coal Size/Type: PEA / ANTHRACITE, NUT-STOVE / ANTHRACITE
Other Heating: Ground Source Heat Pump
Stove/Furnace Make: Hydro Heat /Mega Tek

Re: Glenwood question

PostBy: alfort On: Tue Sep 03, 2013 1:04 pm

I got a 118 last year for $500. Good condition, always stored in the house. Lined fire pot that doesn't need replacement. No rust to speak of. Nickel needs to be replated. (But that's just me, I'm a perfectionist.) It doesn't have, and never did, a back pipe. I want to add that. Just needs cleaning and sealing and it's ready to go. The Modern Oaks are beautiful stoves, I think their proportions are perfect. Even if you don't burn coal, it's worth restoring just to look at.
alfort
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 118, Glenwood Cabinet C
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 118, Glenwood Cabinet C

Re: Glenwood question

PostBy: dcrane On: Tue Sep 03, 2013 3:57 pm

alfort wrote:I got a 118 last year for $500. Good condition, always stored in the house. Lined fire pot that doesn't need replacement. No rust to speak of. Nickel needs to be replated. (But that's just me, I'm a perfectionist.) It doesn't have, and never did, a back pipe. I want to add that. Just needs cleaning and sealing and it's ready to go. The Modern Oaks are beautiful stoves, I think their proportions are perfect. Even if you don't burn coal, it's worth restoring just to look at.


I agree totally, but the cost of building a true baseburner with all their air channels/chambers/flippers/flappers/suspended firepots/etc. is VASTLY differant than a Modern Oak (not to mention that currently for every Mica or Glenwood baseburner their seems to be 100 Modern Oaks). either way $500 is fantastic for any of these works of art :up:
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: Glenwood question

PostBy: Dave 1234 On: Tue Sep 03, 2013 4:57 pm

Thank you all for your tips and knowledge. I'm not sure if it has the back pipe, is that a deal breaker ? Can one be fitted to this stove ? How long of a burn time can be expected ? They are so nice to look at, that I may have to bring her home. :o

Dave
Dave 1234
 
Stove/Furnace Make: EFM
Stove/Furnace Model: 520

Re: Glenwood question

PostBy: stovehospital On: Tue Sep 03, 2013 5:15 pm

The 114 is second from smallest of the Glenwood Modern oaks. They are common and should be available in the 200-400 range. Don't go for the higher priced ones but , instead, look around. This is a good model oak stove but the grates are very thin and tend to sag. The other problem is that the grates have their gears at the back . When you recast, the shrink is often enough so that the gears no longer mesh.
When buying any Glenwood Modern oak, get down on your knees and look the the front of the firepot. they tend to crack in the front, dead center, top to bottom. If it is cracked-----walk away.
I see the prices people are paying for unrestored stoves and I am baffled. By the time you get the stove fixed it would be cheaper to just buy one all done. Prices online are very high and often multiples of the real value. In fact, many stove are advertised for prices higher than we sell them for ----all done. Don't be afraid to walk away from a deal that is too high. I do it daily and I still buy 5-8 stoves per week. The world is full of old stoves. You just need to be patient and keep looking. When folks know you want them they will come.
stovehospital
 
Stove/Furnace Make: 250 stoves in barns
Stove/Furnace Model: #6 Herald baseheater

Re: Glenwood question

PostBy: wsherrick On: Tue Sep 03, 2013 5:21 pm

stovehospital wrote:The 114 is second from smallest of the Glenwood Modern oaks. They are common and should be available in the 200-400 range. Don't go for the higher priced ones but , instead, look around. This is a good model oak stove but the grates are very thin and tend to sag. The other problem is that the grates have their gears at the back . When you recast, the shrink is often enough so that the gears no longer mesh.
When buying any Glenwood Modern oak, get down on your knees and look the the front of the firepot. they tend to crack in the front, dead center, top to bottom. If it is cracked-----walk away.
I see the prices people are paying for unrestored stoves and I am baffled. By the time you get the stove fixed it would be cheaper to just buy one all done. Prices online are very high and often multiples of the real value. In fact, many stove are advertised for prices higher than we sell them for ----all done. Don't be afraid to walk away from a deal that is too high. I do it daily and I still buy 5-8 stoves per week. The world is full of old stoves. You just need to be patient and keep looking. When folks know you want them they will come.


Good advice from the Boss. Listen to him.
wsherrick
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: None
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: None
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: None
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: None
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Glenwood question

PostBy: dcrane On: Wed Sep 04, 2013 5:40 am

stovehospital wrote:The 114 is second from smallest of the Glenwood Modern oaks. They are common and should be available in the 200-400 range. Don't go for the higher priced ones but , instead, look around. This is a good model oak stove but the grates are very thin and tend to sag. The other problem is that the grates have their gears at the back . When you recast, the shrink is often enough so that the gears no longer mesh.
When buying any Glenwood Modern oak, get down on your knees and look the the front of the firepot. they tend to crack in the front, dead center, top to bottom. If it is cracked-----walk away.
I see the prices people are paying for unrestored stoves and I am baffled. By the time you get the stove fixed it would be cheaper to just buy one all done. Prices online are very high and often multiples of the real value. In fact, many stove are advertised for prices higher than we sell them for ----all done. Don't be afraid to walk away from a deal that is too high. I do it daily and I still buy 5-8 stoves per week. The world is full of old stoves. You just need to be patient and keep looking. When folks know you want them they will come.


WHo is this dude? Is this Emery :shock:

Its really nice to hear this kind of stove specific tech advice and this kind of posting not only helps us here and now but will help next generations decades into the future! It would be so nice to see a shop like the stove hospital start achieving a few threads here of the process "start to finish" of some noteworthy coal stoves... from hardware obtained/used to cement to how to prep & polish, etc. (I know it would come full circle back to them for years/decades to come! think about it ;) )

If I cant obtain an unrestored stove for under $300 I don't buy it (I just bought one listed at $3,000 for $300 a few weeks ago, it took some time to explain to the seller why her stove was not made of 24k gold.)
Im also going to pick up a Mica Baseburner this Sat. for $200 (I'll explain how I found it after I pick it up), but Stove Hospital is right... if I had to pay much more than $300 for a stove it simply cheaper and better to go to him and buy one totally restored by a pro.

I should mention the biggest problem I have with pricing and paying "proper value" for an unrestored antique stove is the gosh darn finial :mad3: This presents an issue because in most cases if the stove has a good finial that piece alone can be sold, shipped and dealt with easy by the seller for an easy $100-$200 (some cases even MORE!)... therein lies the problem of trying to explain to a seller how their stove is worth $200-$300 when you know in your mind just the topper of the stove could pull them near that :( I'd rather see a busted up finial (cracked and in pieces on the floor)... these are the stoves that a seller cant sell!
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: Glenwood question

PostBy: alfort On: Wed Sep 04, 2013 8:12 am

I agree with everyone here that if what you want is a good looking stove to keep warm with and not interested in doing the restoration, either buy it cheap and have someone else restore it, or just go buy one that is already restored, you'll be getting warm a lot faster. But for me part of it all is restoring it. I restore/refinish/build furniture for others (and sometimes for myself), so doing the restoration on a stove is something I really look forward to. It's just that the paying work keeps getting in the way. I actually have two stoves to restore. A Glenwood Modern Oak 118 and a Glewnood Cabinet C cookstove. The wood work is busy and I really need to finish rebuilding my forklift engine. So right now the stoves are on the back burner. Lost of stuff to do and not enough time to do it.
alfort
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 118, Glenwood Cabinet C
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 118, Glenwood Cabinet C

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