Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: auntievintage On: Sat Nov 09, 2013 6:26 pm

dlj wrote:I was looking through this thread - yes you have a small broken top finial, Oh well, sure isn't going to change how the stove works and doesn't much affect what it looks like also. I can shoot you a photo if you want to see that detail on my stove that isn't broken.

I think all grates have some bow to them. Don't recall any that were perfectly straight. Mine aren't. As long as you can work them OK the fire sure doesn't know if they are bent or not... Good luck on your quest to find the back pipe. These stoves really kick out heat with or without. They do get more efficient running coal with, but you have to kinda be a "connoisseur" of your stove to really notice the difference. Burning wood you hardly use it... You are really doing one heck of a rebuild job on that stove - it will reward you with great performance...

What size coal did you get? You say you got your whole winters worth but I must have missed what size you got. I find these stoves do very well with stove coal.

Good luck and keep us posted on how it works for you.
Thanks! I actually found anintact finial army local antique store... which was very lucky considering they don't carry stove parts. I picked it up for $22. Eventually I will send it out to be nickled.
As for the coal size, I bought mostly stove and a little bit of nut. I read here that most of you prefer the stove size in these Glenwood.
dj
auntievintage
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Modern Oak 116

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: waldo lemieux On: Sat Nov 09, 2013 6:30 pm

Auntie,

highlight the string in my post ,right click,it should then give you the option to run a google search. or just type the string in your browser.
I think its in NH....
waldo lemieux
 
Stove/Furnace Make: efm
Stove/Furnace Model: s-20

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: DePippo79 On: Sat Nov 09, 2013 7:36 pm

Auntie, thanks for sharing your pictures. Looks like it's coming along nicely. You could also try Barnstable Stove Shop or Stove Hospital. They might have the parts you need. Stove Hospital is in RI. Matt
DePippo79
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Oak 40
Coal Size/Type: Stove, nut/anthracite

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Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: dlj On: Sat Nov 09, 2013 7:46 pm

auntievintage wrote:
dlj wrote:I was looking through this thread - yes you have a small broken top finial, Oh well, sure isn't going to change how the stove works and doesn't much affect what it looks like also. I can shoot you a photo if you want to see that detail on my stove that isn't broken.

I think all grates have some bow to them. Don't recall any that were perfectly straight. Mine aren't. As long as you can work them OK the fire sure doesn't know if they are bent or not... Good luck on your quest to find the back pipe. These stoves really kick out heat with or without. They do get more efficient running coal with, but you have to kinda be a "connoisseur" of your stove to really notice the difference. Burning wood you hardly use it... You are really doing one heck of a rebuild job on that stove - it will reward you with great performance...

What size coal did you get? You say you got your whole winters worth but I must have missed what size you got. I find these stoves do very well with stove coal.

Good luck and keep us posted on how it works for you.

dj

auntievintage wrote:Thanks! I actually found an intact finial at my local antique store... which was very lucky considering they don't carry stove parts. I picked it up for $22. Eventually I will send it out to be nickled.
As for the coal size, I bought mostly stove and a little bit of nut. I read here that most of you prefer the stove size in these Glenwood.


If the stove is tight - and it looks like yours will be - then stove coal runs well in them. Nut works OK too but I prefer stove coal or even larger. Some on here like mixing it up or running different layers. It all depends upon how you work with your stove, how much draft you have,and probably more things I don't know... Pea is too small for the grate system on these stoves. Great find on the finial! Darned lucky I'd say and a nice price.

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: SteveZee On: Mon Nov 11, 2013 8:39 am

I run straight stove coal in my MO116. I get it bulk (5 ton) and there is enough that gets broken to not bother with the nut size I used to mix in. The 116 likes the stove coal just fine as does my cookstove. I used to mix in a 1/3rd of nut but found that I don't need it and the nut was on the small size (Blaschack).
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: dlj On: Mon Nov 11, 2013 11:47 am

SteveZee wrote:I run straight stove coal in my MO116. I get it bulk (5 ton) and there is enough that gets broken to not bother with the nut size I used to mix in. The 116 likes the stove coal just fine as does my cookstove. I used to mix in a 1/3rd of nut but found that I don't need it and the nut was on the small size (Blaschack).


If you have a tight stove, I never understood why you'd want to mix in different smaller sizes of coal. I always felt it limited my ability to run the stove at what ever temperature I wanted. Always had to wait until the smaller stuff had completely burned out before the stove would respond as I wanted. I had some stove coal on the large size, it really was more like egg, and I loved the way that burned. I've never had problems getting the stove to idle down. If I'm running stove, I can run it hot or cool. When I mixed things in, at best I could run cool and medium hot, but the response time was too slow for my tastes. I like to be able to change temps as needed and if it can happen in a minute or less that would be even better... Not many have ever accused me of being overly patient - LOL - Of course, those time frames are not possible with any sized coal, but stove can respond faster than the smaller sizes.

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: nortcan On: Mon Nov 11, 2013 12:27 pm

dlj wrote:
SteveZee wrote:I run straight stove coal in my MO116. I get it bulk (5 ton) and there is enough that gets broken to not bother with the nut size I used to mix in. The 116 likes the stove coal just fine as does my cookstove. I used to mix in a 1/3rd of nut but found that I don't need it and the nut was on the small size (Blaschack).


If you have a tight stove, I never understood why you'd want to mix in different smaller sizes of coal. I always felt it limited my ability to run the stove at what ever temperature I wanted. Always had to wait until the smaller stuff had completely burned out before the stove would respond as I wanted. I had some stove coal on the large size, it really was more like egg, and I loved the way that burned. I've never had problems getting the stove to idle down. If I'm running stove, I can run it hot or cool. When I mixed things in, at best I could run cool and medium hot, but the response time was too slow for my tastes. I like to be able to change temps as needed and if it can happen in a minute or less that would be even better... Not many have ever accused me of being overly patient - LOL - Of course, those time frames are not possible with any sized coal, but stove can respond faster than the smaller sizes.

dj[/quote
DJ,
Did you ever noticed if the stove size can jam the grate more than nut? I mean if the stove big pièces can get in ""powder"" form fast enough to get down in the ash pan without problem?
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: auntievintage On: Mon Nov 11, 2013 6:16 pm

Based on the comments, I am glad I went with mostly stove. If it will be best to use only stove, we can always use the nut in the old federal airtight that is now in the garage.

So Saturday's weather was a BIG kick in the butt to get moving on the firepot :shock:
Image

I hadn't ever done this before and there was a surprising lack of information on how to go about using the noxram... The gentleman at the Love Barn didn't have a lot of advice when I asked so... I just started shoving it in there:
Image
Image
I used a garden spade to smooth it out as best I could and a mallet to pound it in place:
Image
Image
Then a damp rag to smooth it out:
Image
I think it looks decent and I don't think I could have gone much thicker because I wanted to be careful to have room to screw the pot back in place. Two days later it is pretty darn dry, although it did shrink away from the pot a bit :?
Image

We will be putting the stove back together this week. Any advice on sealing is greatly appreciated!!
Meanwhile, I've got the bug. In my searches for the pipe for this stove, I have come across a base burner that is tempting me... I will have to post another thread for it, but I can't seem to find a lot of info. It is a Richmond 116 from 1885 out of CT. If anyone is familiar with this stove, I could use some advice before I go crazy and just start buying up old stoves... what IS it about these things?? :P
auntievintage
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Modern Oak 116

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: franco b On: Mon Nov 11, 2013 7:56 pm

Looks like a nice neat uniform job. The joints seal with furnace cement. I like to dampen the surfaces with a small paint brush which I think gives better adhesion. You can buy Rutland in a caulking tube at tractor Supply, which makes the job faster and easier. William prefers other brands which he feels are better, or you can buy a small tub in your plumbing supply. Probably Hercules. Hardware stores seem to carry Imperial which I think comes from the UK. I have used it right in the fire pot as well as seams and it holds up very well.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: DePippo79 On: Mon Nov 11, 2013 8:59 pm

"what is it about these things"
I think it's the fascination of days gone by. Much simpler times. Back when people and companies put thier heart and soul, and actually took pride in what they did. So much competition back then, just good enough wouldn't have cut it. I digress. Looking good. Thank you for the picture documentation. Matt
DePippo79
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Oak 40
Coal Size/Type: Stove, nut/anthracite

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: franco b On: Mon Nov 11, 2013 11:14 pm

DePippo79 wrote:"what is it about these things"
I think it's the fascination of days gone by. Much simpler times. Back when people and companies put thier heart and soul, and actually took pride in what they did. So much competition back then, just good enough wouldn't have cut it. I digress. Looking good. Thank you for the picture documentation. Matt

Nostalgia is a funny thing, we tend to remember the good parts and forget the bad. Ask someone who has been in the armed forces what he did and invariably you get what he did on leave.

For a truer picture read O'Henry, and Jack London did an essay on tramps, something you don't see today but common then. Prosperity was high but only relative to a harsh life on the farm.

The stoves we like are generally the top of the line rather than the more ordinary cheap ones.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: dcrane On: Tue Nov 12, 2013 4:24 am

@ auntievintage .... great post with great photo's above! :clap:

I will give a suggestion from one of our resident antique stove experts William... "Get Colco Furnace Cement"

also... wedding bands don't mix well with cement toothy
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: auntievintage On: Tue Nov 12, 2013 9:40 am

DePippo79 wrote:" So much competition back then, just good enough wouldn't have cut it"


Ahhh... then its my love of the free market that gets my goat with these old stoves? I can see that. Its true that, when left alone, the free market produces the best and allows the inferior to fall to the wayside!
Meanwhile, I "have a friend who has an old friend" who lives down the road from me who supposedly has a trailer load of these old stoves and has been sitting on them for years. He is going to set me up to go over there (hopefully this week). From what I hear, he is someone who will sit for HOURS and talk about old stoves. I am excited!
auntievintage
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Modern Oak 116

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: auntievintage On: Tue Nov 12, 2013 10:45 am

Also, do you know where one could buy the Colco?
auntievintage
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Modern Oak 116

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: waldo lemieux On: Tue Nov 12, 2013 12:30 pm

Did you ever find a pipe?
waldo lemieux
 
Stove/Furnace Make: efm
Stove/Furnace Model: s-20

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