Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: auntievintage On: Tue Nov 12, 2013 1:07 pm

Unfortunately, no. I am in hopes that, by chance, I may spy one when we go to see the "guy with the trailer full of antique stoves". Otherwise, I am still on the lookout!
auntievintage
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Modern Oak 116

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: wsherrick On: Wed Nov 13, 2013 4:13 am

The lining job you did on the fire pot looks first rate. Remember to build a little tiny charcoal or wood fire in it at first to cure the cement lining. There is a lot of moisture still in there and you want it to cure out at a slow rate. After that it is fine to go full steam ahead.

If you can't get the Colco Cement. Get Hercules instead. It is very durable and works very well. You should be able to easily get it at Lowes or Home Depot. These cements have a fiber base to them that allows them to form into tight spaces very well and stick to the metal surfaces. They also remain a little bit flexible so they won't crack due to the expansion and contraction that normally occurs.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: SteveZee On: Thu Nov 14, 2013 12:23 pm

Excellent job on the liner! Yours came out better then mine. It's nice and uniform and smooth. You could be a potter! ;)
SteveZee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Modern Oak 116 & Glenwood 208 C Range

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Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: dlj On: Sat Nov 16, 2013 1:10 pm

nortcan wrote:DJ,
Did you ever noticed if the stove size can jam the grate more than nut? I mean if the stove big pièces can get in ""powder"" form fast enough to get down in the ash pan without problem?


Nortcan,

Sorry, I just saw this question. No, I found that smaller sizes tended to jam the grates more than the larger sizes. I occasionally have a minor problem with my grates getting jammed, but not seriously. They tend to get stuck such that I can't rotate them 360 degrees but only back and forth a bit. I usually don't worry about it and let the fire run longer, burning out any coal that may have stuck in the grate. In the case when that doesn't work, then I know I have clinkers and will remove the clinkers via various methods.

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: dlj On: Sat Nov 16, 2013 1:26 pm

auntievintage wrote:Ahhh... then its my love of the free market that gets my goat with these old stoves? I can see that. Its true that, when left alone, the free market produces the best and allows the inferior to fall to the wayside!
Meanwhile, I "have a friend who has an old friend" who lives down the road from me who supposedly has a trailer load of these old stoves and has been sitting on them for years. He is going to set me up to go over there (hopefully this week). From what I hear, he is someone who will sit for HOURS and talk about old stoves. I am excited!


Anutievintage,

Do keep us up to date on the trailer load of stoves.

Your lined fire pot came out very well. I'd say you are the new expert in fire pot lining! ;)

Your nut coal will burn fine in the stove, you can burn it alone, mix it in with the stove etc, in as many ways as you wish. Form your own opinion on how well it performs in your stove and report back your results... It's how we all learn. I'm frankly very lazy when it comes to doing all those things. I've tried a number of ways of doing things in the past, found what I like and now just stick to it. Simple. Unless I find a "problem" that I want to resolve, I don't experiment any more, just go with what I know and find easy to use... But I do love hearing what other folk try and what they discover...

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: auntievintage On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 11:22 am

Hoping someone here can answer a quick stove pipe question...

I was hoping to take our time and build our hearth before lighting her up but the blower motor went on our furnace and I awoke to a 46 degree house Monday morning. We got a new blower and installed it Monday night but its not working properly and, with the furnace running constant, 60 degrees is the max we can get.

Rather than screw around with that any more before the holiday, I decided to get the stove put back together. After all, I can not begin to tell you how aggrevating it is to have 6 tons of blaschak sitting outside while we shiver inside. I spent the (chilly) evening lovingly sealing and reassembling her... sorry no pics as I didn't want to waste any time.

...our other stove had a 6" pipe. The collar on the back of the 116 appears to be 5 1/4"... I have looked around locally and this seems to be an oddball size.... any suggestions on how we can get this beast hooked up tonight?? Any advise is greatly appreciated!
auntievintage
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Modern Oak 116

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 11:54 am

As a temporary fix you can neck down a piece of thin wall 6 inch stove pipe.

Using needle nose pliers, crimp a 6 inch pipe by clamping the pipe edge with the pliers 90 degrees to the pipe edge. Twist the pliers as close as you can to 180 degrees so that your folding the clamped section over onto the pipe edge next to it. Put something solid inside the pipe to support it and hammer the folded edge down flat. You may need to do that in more than one spot to get the 6 inch pipe reduced at the end to your 5-1/4 inch diameter. Install the pipe with some high temp sealer to fill the crimp gaps you just made.

Another way is to make a long cut up the length of the pipe from one edge almost to the other end. Overlap the cut edges with each other at the rim to reduce the diameter. Drill and pop rivet the overlap and caulk the new seam with furnace cement. This is how I made the 6 inch round to larger oval for the back of my Glenwood range. It's lasted 8 years so far.

That should get you going plus give you time to find a shop that can make a more permanent pipe.

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: auntievintage On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 12:00 pm

Thanks! My husband mentioned picking up a crimping tool and some high temp today but I wasn't sure... that is why I LOVE this forum!
auntievintage
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Modern Oak 116

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 12:05 pm

auntievintage wrote:Thanks! My husband mentioned picking up a crimping tool and some high temp today but I wasn't sure... that is why I LOVE this forum!


The crimping tool, if it's like the ones I've seen, only has so much it can reduce the diameter. Better for when the pipes have less mismatch in size than 6 inch down to 5-1/4. You may have to resort to more drastic measures.

Just curious. Is the 5-1/4 the inside, or the outside diameter of the stove flange ?
Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: auntievintage On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 12:32 pm

5 1/4" is the O.D.

You are probably right about the crimping tool... pliers make more sense. Hopefully this will work for the short-term.
auntievintage
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Modern Oak 116

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: titleist1 On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 12:37 pm

Rather than crimping down the 6", can you just put the 6" pipe over the stove collar which would be wrapped with 1/2" rope gasket? Not sure how you would secure the stove pipe, is there a screw hole already on the stove collar to make use of?
titleist1
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman Mag Stoker (old style) one in basement, one in workshop
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III on standby for long power outages
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite; Nut/Anthracite

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: ONEDOLLAR On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 1:06 pm

3M makes a product called "HIGH TEMPERATURE FLUE TAPE" Good for up to 600f on a flue/pipe and works GREAT. sealed up some stove pipe on my new Chubby with it.

I got it at a local Ace Hardware but I suspect HD and Lowes probably carry it as well.
ONEDOLLAR
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: 2014 Chubby Prototype
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford #2 Base Heater
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Anthracite

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 2:37 pm

When you get time, if you can't find a 6 x 5 pipe reducer locally , here's one at Woodsman's Parts Plus.

http://www.woodmanspartsplus.com/SubPag ... 7&spt_id=3

More here,
http://www.woodmanspartsplus.com/4940/B ... -Pipe.html

Paul.
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: franco b On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 2:40 pm

Just cut a strip of sheet metal a bit over an inch wide to wrap around with several layers to fill the 3/8 gap. Coil loosely and fill by plastering with furnace cement.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: auntievintage On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 5:48 pm

Thanks so much everyone. I think we've got it now... at least until we find us someone to make something a bit prettier.

Next question.... we'd like to light this now but, when I put the stove back together, the top collar (that sets on the barrel) didn't look like it had ever been sealed... should I seal it? It really doesn't look like there is anywhere to put the cement...
auntievintage
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Glenwood
Stove/Furnace Model: Modern Oak 116

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