Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: franco b On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 6:09 pm

Put the top on and put a light inside the stove and see if any light leaks out to the outside. It would not hurt to put a light bead on to be sure though.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: auntievintage On: Thu Nov 28, 2013 10:16 am

Well, we decided to seal the top, got it all back together and ran a few paper fires, then kindling fires and then, at about 7pm, the coal!!! :D
We went with all stove coal and were very pleased with the result. We would still REALLY like to find the indirect vent pipe for the back, but no luck thus far.

Ok... so here are the questions:
What is an ok stack temp? Ours was running at about 360 for most of the evening. She was throwing some good, steady heat and all seemed well. We went to say goodnight to her at about midnight and as we turned out the lights we were admiring the stove in the dark when we noticed that the fire pot was glowing a bit in the front and one side. Not glowing enough to see with the lights on, but you could see it in the dark.
We closed her down to see if we could drop temp and we got the stack down to about 325. That stopped the glowing. We used the cigarette trick to look for drafts, it was sealed good everywhere except the bottom of the ash door. It was a fairly mild night and we had great draft through the chimney. Where we live so high and its always quite windy, I am afraid that on a colder night (like tonight will be) it will be too much draft.
Maybe I didn't line the pot thick enough??? Maybe I just need to find a way to improve the seal on the ash door???

The stove was losing temperature by 7:30am... I shook it down and added coal but it doesn't look like its catching... I'm afraid I am going to have to empty it out and start over.
auntievintage
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood 116
Coal Size/Type: Stove / Nut
Other Heating: Oil forced luke-warm air

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: dlj On: Thu Nov 28, 2013 10:29 am

auntievintage wrote:Well, we decided to seal the top, got it all back together and ran a few paper fires, then kindling fires and then, at about 7pm, the coal!!! :D
We went with all stove coal and were very pleased with the result. We would still REALLY like to find the indirect vent pipe for the back, but no luck thus far.

Ok... so here are the questions:
What is an ok stack temp? Ours was running at about 360 for most of the evening. She was throwing some good, steady heat and all seemed well. We went to say goodnight to her at about midnight and as we turned out the lights we were admiring the stove in the dark when we noticed that the fire pot was glowing a bit in the front and one side. Not glowing enough to see with the lights on, but you could see it in the dark.
We closed her down to see if we could drop temp and we got the stack down to about 325. That stopped the glowing. We used the cigarette trick to look for drafts, it was sealed good everywhere except the bottom of the ash door. It was a fairly mild night and we had great draft through the chimney. Where we live so high and its always quite windy, I am afraid that on a colder night (like tonight will be) it will be too much draft.
Maybe I didn't line the pot thick enough??? Maybe I just need to find a way to improve the seal on the ash door???

The stove was losing temperature by 7:30am... I shook it down and added coal but it doesn't look like its catching... I'm afraid I am going to have to empty it out and start over.


Auntievintage,

That's a pretty high stack temperature. Mine runs typically around 100. Right now it's at about 250 because I was running with the damper wide open and the bottom door open and forgot to close it because I was on here reading... LOL As I was writing this I got up to read what the stack temp was and realized I'd forgotten to close up the stove after filling it earlier....

But absolute numbers don't mean a lot. It depends upon where you have your thermometer. You're sending a lot of heat up your chimney at those high stack temps. I'd close the damper down. Does sound like you'll need to get your bottom ash door better sealed. You didn't say how you got the flue temp to drop. Where are you running your air dampers? With a glowing base, you are running very hot indeed... Nothing to do with the ceramic liner..

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

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Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Thu Nov 28, 2013 10:42 am

Sounds like too much air getting in somewhere, or dampers not closed enough.

Also, how well sealed is the bottom plate of the ash pan area ? Did you look under and do a smoke suction test under the base skirt around that plate ? You may need a mirror to see up under there.

When you left it for the night, how open were the two ash door dampers, the secondary damper in the loading door, and the stack pipe damper (MPD) ?

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: auntievintage On: Thu Nov 28, 2013 11:56 am

The stack temp was taken about 2' above the exhaust outlet. Without the indirect vent option, I couldn't imagine having a much lower stack temp as the exhaust goes directly from the top of the firepot into the stove pipe with just a regular damper in between... ?? There is nothing there to prevent the heat loss.

We did the smoke test around every part, including the ash pan area, up under the skirt, the firepot... etc. The only area it was drawing in was the bottom of the ash pan door. When we left it last night, I had the damper in the stovepipe at about 3/4 closed and the ash pit dampers were just barely opened a sliver. I think the problem is definitely the ash pit door.

I read on here about someone taking wax paper and some sort of sealer to make a better fit. I am thinking that refractory cement would be too brittle and would crack off with opening and closing the door. Does anyone have some recommendation on a more flexible seal?

Also, any recommendation on regulating stack temp? I could see getting a temp of 150-250 with a base burner due to the design but that can't be replicated with this stove. Maybe I will have to find some way to create a baffle but that will have to wait until spring time.
auntievintage
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood 116
Coal Size/Type: Stove / Nut
Other Heating: Oil forced luke-warm air

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Thu Nov 28, 2013 1:05 pm

Yes, that close to the stove outlet it's going to be high compared to what others get taking their pipe readings farther away from the stove.

Even with the ash door dampers only open a sliver your getting more air added through the leak. And you may be able to run the stove on less than the 3/4 open of the stack damper.

Since you have air coming in through a leaky ash door, here's an experiment you can try until you get that ash door to seal better. Let the leaky door be your ash damper opening. See what temps the stove puts out with both ash door dampers fully closed.

If you have the type of stack damper plate that has some holes in it, try closing it all the way. See what that produces in the way of temps. Don't close it all the way if it's one of the solid type pipe dampers without holes.

Another question. What size coal are you burning ? Some stoves run slower on smaller size, such as nut.

I can't get stove coal here only nut. But, I've found that by picking out the biggest pieces of nut and testing using just those in the stove, my range runs very hot and tougher to slow down. If I were just using it to cook, the stove would work faster/hotter and that's what Glenwood says to use in this.

To live with the air leaks this unrestored range has (until I can get together all the parts I need to restore it), at night I pick out the largest pieces of nut coal and put them in a box behind the stove to burn during the day. That gives the firebox more coal density (more fuel per cubic inch of firebox), and smaller air spaces between the coal chunks (slows the burn rate). The results are that it is more controllable and runs slower and longer through the night. The large chunks that get picked out make for quicker heat up and higher temps for cooking during the day. Once it's properly rebuilt coal size shouldn't mater as much as it does now.

It'll take some experimenting with coal size to see what your stove and draft prefer, but it will show you what works best for your set-up. And, you get to stay nice and warm while your testing the stove ! :)

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: McGiever On: Thu Nov 28, 2013 3:37 pm

Auntie Vintage said:
We went with all stove coal and we're very pleased with the result.


Maybe not so pleased if w/ ash door air leak making it difficult to slow down. ;)
McGiever
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AXEMAN-ANDERSON 130 "1959"
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: HARMAN MAGNUM
Hand Fed Coal Stove: RADIANT HOME AIR BLAST
Baseburners & Antiques: OUR GLENWOOD 111 BASEBURNER "1908"
Coal Size/Type: PEA / ANTHRACITE, NUT-STOVE / ANTHRACITE
Other Heating: Ground Source Heat Pump
Stove/Furnace Make: Hydro Heat /Mega Tek

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Thu Nov 28, 2013 6:38 pm

McGiever wrote:Auntie Vintage said:
We went with all stove coal and we're very pleased with the result.


Maybe not so pleased if w/ ash door air leak making it difficult to slow down. ;)


Read right over that part about, ' ... went with all stove coal ... ' and didn't see it. :oops:
Thanks for pointing it out.

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: dlj On: Thu Nov 28, 2013 10:51 pm

The temps I told you about earlier was with my stove in direct draft mode, it wasn't in base burner mode. I have the stack thermometer at exactly 9 inches from the output of my stove, three inches beyond the MPD which is at 6 inches from the back of my stove. Running 2 feet from the output of your stove and getting up in the 300's is high. Especially for coal.

Since you have a leak under your ash pit door, try closing off the air intake completely and closing the damper more. I run my stove mostly with the damper completely closed. When I'm running hot - I'll have the damper about 7/8's closed. I only open it fully when tending the fire.

fwiw

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: franco b On: Fri Nov 29, 2013 12:33 am

Permatex High Heat Red Silicon Gasket Maker is what you want. Walmart and other places carry it. Put a bead around inside door flange and close the door on wax paper to prevent sticking to stove body. You probably only need to do the bottom of the door and the two sides. Wipe off excess and let set. Best to wire brush the door flanges first to remove dirt and rust as much as possible.

An alternative is the very narrow fiberglass gasket material that comes in a double strip for sealing glass. Has its own sticky backing. Try a stove store for availability. Need only apply where there is gap.

Without the extended back pipe stack temp will be higher than with, but first seal the door so you can properly control the fire. When you are able to do that, then you can determine the firing rate where stack temp. becomes too high. I agree the stove could use a baffle if the back pipe is unavailable.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: dlj On: Fri Nov 29, 2013 12:53 am

Recommended flue temperatures burning wood run between 250 and about 475. That's for direct draft wood stoves and that range is what is considered the temperature required in the flue so you don't deposit creosote. The actual flue temps are typically lower unless running the stove hot. I have a good friend of mine that runs his wood stove with the flue temps closer to 150. He will run hotter from time to time to burn out the creosote. Coal runs with lower flue temps than when burning wood. I certainly wouldn't expect Auntievintage to get the low stack temps I get in my stove with the baseburner, but she is running coal quite hot when up in high 300's. With that stove set-up, the stack should be running at least a 100 degrees less than what she stated. Until she gets the door fixed, she can close off the air and MPD. If she has good draft on her chimney, 3/4 closed MPD is still quite open.

dj
dlj
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: auntievintage On: Thu Oct 30, 2014 10:51 am

Has it been nearly a year already?
Just thought I'd update. ..

We had a tough year with parents, illnesses and saying goodbye to ones we love so I was unable to keep up with the coal crew.

Our 116 got us through a very long winter last year as our main heat source.
It took a little bit to get used to regulating but, after a few burns, I was able to keep the stack temp down and have consistent 18 hour burns (even with a leaky bottom door).

I was getting ready to fire her up soon (snow this weekend) but had a terrible accident. I tripped over a child's gate while carrying my guitar & small amp when the corner of the amp came down at the center of the stand of the 116 and cracked it clear through. :mad:

As we were trying to figure out where we could have it welded, I came across another 116 a couple of hours from here for $475... we went to take a look and picked it up. It has a small crack in the front of the pot that was welded. Its not pretty as far as the nickel and the paint goes, but the base is in great shape, the ash door passes the dollar bill test snugly *AND* it has the indirect vent pipe (in perfect condition) for the back that I have been searching and searching for!!! The pipe is the main reason I was willing to buy it.

So: New project. I will take the stand, base and back pipe from the 116 we just got and put them on our stove so that we'll be ready to go. I'll take the parts from our stove, have the stand welded and put it all together for the workshop stove so we can continue on our massive remodel through the winter.

I am currently trying to figure out where to buy more Noxram. I got it from the "Love Barn" in Ellsworth, ME last year but he is only open seasonally and I haven't been able to get a hold of him. I need to line the pot for the new stove we just bought. Does anyone have any suggestions? I've seen a few people refer to buying it in Maine but not specifically stating where.

Additionally (as if we didn't have enough projects right now), we just finished tearing down the old woodshed (which was falling over) and we are in a mad-dash to erect our coal bin in the next two weeks because we ordered loose coal instead of bagged for this year. If I'd have know what a roller-coaster year it was going to be, I wouldn't have been so confident in our ability to get all of our projects done in time and would have stuck with bagged for one more year. Ugh.
auntievintage
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood 116
Coal Size/Type: Stove / Nut
Other Heating: Oil forced luke-warm air

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: auntievintage On: Thu Oct 30, 2014 11:14 am

One more techie questions:
The photos in this thread are showing so large that you really can't see them... they didn't used to show like that. Does anyone know how I could fix that?
auntievintage
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood 116
Coal Size/Type: Stove / Nut
Other Heating: Oil forced luke-warm air

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: Photog200 On: Thu Oct 30, 2014 11:53 am

auntievintage wrote:One more techie questions:
The photos in this thread are showing so large that you really can't see them... they didn't used to show like that. Does anyone know how I could fix that?


It looks like you embedded the photos in the post somehow??? Would you like me to repost them for you? I was able to download your originals and they look good. I would be happy to do that if you want.

Randy
Edit: I see what the problem was, the original photos were 45" the long way. I would be happy to downsize those and repost if you want.
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: Tonight I'm looking at a Glenwood Modern Oak no. 116

PostBy: auntievintage On: Thu Oct 30, 2014 12:04 pm

If you could, that would be great!
auntievintage
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood 116
Coal Size/Type: Stove / Nut
Other Heating: Oil forced luke-warm air

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