Switching from wood to coal

Switching from wood to coal

PostBy: Jlenc On: Mon Sep 30, 2013 7:13 pm

Hi,
My name is Joseph and I'm new to this forum. My wife and I have recently made the decision to give up the wood burner and switch to coal. The time, labor and shortages of places to gather firewood has taken its toll. To buy fire wood is insane. After doing the math it is much more economical to burn coal. Now I don't know much about coal burning and after visiting a local stove shop and almost fainting after learning the price of today's coal stoker stoves I began an exhaustive search in the classifieds and ran across this forum. I have to tell you after perusing this forum for the past couple of days I feel like I've been the benefactor of a crash college course in coal stoves and coal as fuel. It was just fate I guess that I was cruising YouTube and found William Sherrick's how to videos with the cylinder stove and parlor stoves. I am not looking to heat my whole home with the stove but just as an alternate source of heat for my rec room and a couple rooms in the back portion of the house above the rec room. Although I would be interested in a stove for heating my garage in the future also. I find myself very intrigued by the the old cylinder, Base-burner and parlor stoves of the turn of the century. The only experience I've had with coal burning stoves is when I was very young my father used hand fired coal stoves to heat the shop where he housed his vehicles and equipment from his painting business. I remember him showing me how to shake the grates and top off the fire pots but it was under his direct supervision as I was only 6-8 years old at the time. I've really enjoyed all the information from all of you and am seriously considering purchasing one of these turn of the century stoves and would appreciate any advice.
Thank you,
Joseph
Jlenc
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: 270 Stewart Oak
Coal Size/Type: Nut
Stove/Furnace Model: 270 Stewart Oak

Re: Switching from wood to coal

PostBy: KLook On: Mon Sep 30, 2013 7:20 pm

Welcome to the forum! You hang right on and there will be a whole bunch of guys that love those old burners. I wish I had a space for one.

Kevin
KLook
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Harman VF 3000
Coal Size/Type: rice, bagged, Blaschak
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman (Back In Maine)
Stove/Furnace Model: VF 3000

Re: Switching from wood to coal

PostBy: DePippo79 On: Mon Sep 30, 2013 7:25 pm

Welcome to the forum. My first year burning coal with a antique Glenwood and yes it is as easy as William shows in his videos. I'm sure the new stoves are good, but I went with the antique because it goes with the house. Although when I get the funds a coal boiler is going in. Where are you located and what exactly do you want to do. Ask your questions. Again welcome to the forum. Matt
PS: Try Barnstable Stove Shop and Stove Hospital for the antique stuff. Both have websites. Both good people. Went to the Harmon dealer when I first started researching and all they want to do is sell pellet stoves.
DePippo79
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Oak 40, Stanley Argand No. 30, Glenwood Modern Oak 114, Stanley Argand No. 20 missing parts.
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite. Stove and nut size.
Other Heating: Oil hot water.

Visit Lehigh Anthracite

Re: Switching from wood to coal

PostBy: michaelanthony On: Mon Sep 30, 2013 7:46 pm

Welcome Joseph and wife. The only bad news is this spring you will be bummed! :P
michaelanthony
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vigilant 2310, gold marc box, vogelzang pot belly coat rack
Coal Size/Type: Pea, and a little nut
Other Heating: Very cold FHA oil furnace

Re: Switching from wood to coal

PostBy: GoodProphets On: Mon Sep 30, 2013 8:06 pm

Parlor stove is on my secret wish list.

Read some more, hope you find the perfect one for your needs!
GoodProphets
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Coal Size/Type: Anthra Rice
Other Heating: 3 Fireplaces

Re: Switching from wood to coal

PostBy: Jlenc On: Mon Sep 30, 2013 8:13 pm

Thanks for all the warm welcomes. We are from the foothills of the Poconos in a small town called Weatherly. That's right in between White Haven, Jim Thorpe and Hazleton. I am planning hopefully to acquire one of baseburners or Oak stoves to supplement my heating system and possibly try my hand at restoring one if the purchase price was right. But I do want to hopefully find one that I could use for this winter. I have already began to sell off the tools associated with wood burning and will use the money it to invest in my first coal stove.
Jlenc
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: 270 Stewart Oak
Coal Size/Type: Nut
Stove/Furnace Model: 270 Stewart Oak

Re: Switching from wood to coal

PostBy: dcrane On: Mon Sep 30, 2013 8:30 pm

welcome to the coal forum, our good friend William's forum name is wsherrick here and he has indeed helped teach the world including me a lot about antique stoves. The main problem now is the price seems to increase and the supply seems to decrease each year on these (their are only so many out their that are viable restorations). The good news is they are still about the same cost as a brand new coal stove produced by the thousands (so still a bargain in my mind!)

Their are many different types of these old parlor stoves and even though they may look very similar... with flashy nickel, mica doors, top finials, etc. they can be vastly different in design, function & efficiency. The trick is to read lots of threads here on the forum (type in the search box top right of screen, things like "baseburner" or "parlor stove" or "antique stove" and start reading), we have Dbl heater type, baseburner type, oak type, direct vent, 3 sided mica, etc. and then to define it more than that we have different designs within each category! Ive found that direct vent, Oak type parlor stoves are available 100x more than a true Baseburner style parlor stove, I find the very ornate Mica stoves seems to cost more money than a good functional Glenwood Baseburner for example (I guess theirs more buyers for those super ornate mica stoves and 90% of them will probably not even fire them up).

If your planning on buying an antique used then you really need to learn what to watch for because 99% of those old parlor stoves on creigs list aren't worth 1/10th of what they ask for them and you would be far better of going to a stove shop and buying one completely reconditioned for $3,000 than to buy a used/unknown one for $1,000 only to find out its worthless and cant be repaired without spending $5,000 more.

I guess these are some basics to get you rolling... hope it helps.... now gogogo... to the search feature on the forum :dancing:
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: Switching from wood to coal

PostBy: Jlenc On: Mon Sep 30, 2013 9:42 pm

Thanks for the advice dcrane, I really appreciate it. I'm going to keep reading and get thoroughly informed before I take a crack a purchase. Off to the hunt!
Jlenc
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: 270 Stewart Oak
Coal Size/Type: Nut
Stove/Furnace Model: 270 Stewart Oak

Re: Switching from wood to coal

PostBy: Davian On: Mon Sep 30, 2013 9:44 pm

GoodProphets wrote:Parlor stove is on my secret wish list.

Read some more, hope you find the perfect one for your needs!


Mine too...I'd love to have a nice old parlor stove that's restored. I found one local for around $700 but it needed a fortune to get it going again.
Davian
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Morso
Stove/Furnace Model: 1410 Squirrel

Re: Switching from wood to coal

PostBy: Jlenc On: Tue Oct 01, 2013 6:02 pm

Good evening,
I don't know if I'm fortunate or not but I found an antique cylinder stove called a 270 Stewart Oak just recently restored by the people at the Stove Hospital in RI. Seems the fella that has it had discovered and bought it in upstate NY and took it to the Stove Hospital to be restored and now finds that his situation has changed and he needs to let it go. My question is, is this a reputable and reliable stove and also it was advertised as a parlor/ base heater, is this a base heater or one of those that just sends the exhaust down one side of the flue and up the other? It has a flue pipe on the back of it and is connected at the bottom and just below the dome. Any input would be greatly appreciated.
Jlenc
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: 270 Stewart Oak
Coal Size/Type: Nut
Stove/Furnace Model: 270 Stewart Oak

Re: Switching from wood to coal

PostBy: coalnewbie On: Tue Oct 01, 2013 6:16 pm

Yes , I almost bought this one last year it's a great stove. Instead I opted for a mica stove at the last minute. Now I wish I had gone ahead.
coalnewbie
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: LL AnthraKing 180K, Pocono110K,KStokr 90K, DVC
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93,
Baseburners & Antiques: Invader 2 Wings Best, Glenwood #8 + Herald 116x
Coal Size/Type: Rice, Chestnut
Other Heating: Heating Oil CH, Toyotomi OM 22

Re: Switching from wood to coal

PostBy: Jlenc On: Tue Oct 01, 2013 6:53 pm

Wow,
Hey thanks coalnewbie. What do you think a fair price would be for this stove, I mean it hasn't even been lit since it was restored, it looks great inside and out and it's ready to go.
Jlenc
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: 270 Stewart Oak
Coal Size/Type: Nut
Stove/Furnace Model: 270 Stewart Oak

Re: Switching from wood to coal

PostBy: dcrane On: Wed Oct 02, 2013 4:47 am

Jlenc wrote:Good evening,
I don't know if I'm fortunate or not but I found an antique cylinder stove called a 270 Stewart Oak just recently restored by the people at the Stove Hospital in RI. Seems the fella that has it had discovered and bought it in upstate NY and took it to the Stove Hospital to be restored and now finds that his situation has changed and he needs to let it go. My question is, is this a reputable and reliable stove and also it was advertised as a parlor/ base heater, is this a base heater or one of those that just sends the exhaust down one side of the flue and up the other? It has a flue pipe on the back of it and is connected at the bottom and just below the dome. Any input would be greatly appreciated.


OK... after searching my guess is that its not a true baseburner but rather an indirect rear flu pipe... this is the only close evidence I found of this http://www.ebay.com/itm/Antique-Stewart ... 7675.l2557

Note the last photo of ash area: those are single walls around that ash pan area (the tell tail is not a true base burner to me)... we have several members that have these so it would be nice to hear more from them on this subject?
Value is totally dependent on condition (this one on ebay sold pretty fast for $2,200 and the refractory was not done well and it does not appear to have new grates) but the rest looks pretty darn good.
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: Switching from wood to coal

PostBy: Jlenc On: Wed Oct 02, 2013 8:59 pm

Thanks dcrane,
Yeah I don't know how long ago that other sold but this one was 2400$
Jlenc
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: 270 Stewart Oak
Coal Size/Type: Nut
Stove/Furnace Model: 270 Stewart Oak

Re: Switching from wood to coal

PostBy: Jlenc On: Wed Oct 09, 2013 6:54 pm

We'll I finally have a coal stove. My wife and I brought it home today. It took some doing but we were able to get it off the truck and in the rec room close to where it will very shortly be installed. It's vey nice, it's the 270 Stewart Oak that I wrote about earlier. It's been restored by the folks at the Stove Hospital in RI. It has new Mica glass, new grates and is painted and all resealed and ready to burn in. The fire pot is in great shape and a refractory cement protective coating has been poured around it to protect it. The only thing that is missing is the left side nickel skirting so I will be leaving them both off till I can hopefully locate one and have them both replated. If I can't find one I am hoping to find someone who may have one that can maybe be used to cast a new one. I mean it looks good without them on the stove but I would really like to find one because I think it would really dress it up nice and put it back to original. The stove is an indirect heater, it has a cast iron flue pipe on the back that has a door near the top that can open and close to direct the hot air down to the bottom of the stove and then back up the pipe and out to the chimney. It has a 7 inch oval opening so I have to find a. Stove pipe that has a 7 inch oval opening that goes into a 6 inch pipe. I will post pics when I get it installed right now, I need a break!
Jlenc
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: 270 Stewart Oak
Coal Size/Type: Nut
Stove/Furnace Model: 270 Stewart Oak

Visit Lehigh Anthracite