Lighting A Coal Stove (Different Question)

Lighting A Coal Stove (Different Question)

PostBy: BPatrick On: Tue Oct 22, 2013 10:27 am

I know there is a sticky thread about a mile long but as I read it and learn about the many different types of methods, it seems to me that there are many different ways to skin a cat so to speak. Some use Charcoal, some have sticks around the yard and build a pyramid with small sticks on top and some do it in reverse and get the fire going and then add bigger pieces. Again very interesting but for me, I work in the RV industry. We build trailers and 5th wheels and we use all real wood, no wrap or partical board. A couple of buddies of mine take the big refrigerator boxes and fill them with kiln dried oak and pine pieces. 2x4 and 1x2. I can build a loose fire with the sticks and the temps get up there quick while I have some coal in already to get it going. Literally 10 minutes later I've got some coal burning along with the small pieces of wood already turned to coals. It doesn't soot up my mica windows, (my dumb butt burning wood in the spring did that), so that what I do. Is the reason a lot of people use charcoal because of the creosote build up on the glass. With kiln dried wood, I have to start the stove a handful of times in the burning season. I cannot imagine this would be enough to devlop creosote. Besides, I don't pack the small wood pieces together, I have oak and pine mixed and its 500 degrees real quick. I want to get coal going so I'm using the heat of the fire and coals to get coal going. I wouldn't think that would be adding creosote. Your thoughts.
BPatrick
 
Baseburners & Antiques: 2 Crawford 40 Baseheaters
Coal Size/Type: Stove Coal
Other Heating: Herald Oak No. 18

Re: Lighting A Coal Stove (Different Question)

PostBy: titleist1 On: Tue Oct 22, 2013 10:35 am

in the hand fed I always used wood to start the coal fire, either branches or scrap 2x's. my glass would get dirtied up from the wood , but when weather turned colder and i had the constant coal fire it would mostly clean up by itself when the stove was really cranking out the heat on those especially cold nights. i would only have to wipe off the ash like residue, never had to scrape it clean.
titleist1
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman Mag Stoker (old style) one in basement, one in workshop
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III on standby for long power outages
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite; Nut/Anthracite

Re: Lighting A Coal Stove (Different Question)

PostBy: samhill On: Tue Oct 22, 2013 11:06 am

Most creosote comes from regular firewood IMO even more so for the ones that don't allow at least a season to dry, I used to get kiln dried oak from a wood working shop when I lived near Pittsburgh & just used a fireplace. That oak won't add much more than some serious heat, I wish I could still get it but not worth the drive so I burn anything I can get in my garage since I only need a short fast fire & even burning hemlock that's been drying for a full year or better I get very little buildup.
samhill
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: keystoker 160
Hand Fed Coal Stove: hitzer 75 in garage
Stove/Furnace Make: keystoker/hitzer
Stove/Furnace Model: koker 160/ hitzer 75

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Re: Lighting A Coal Stove (Different Question)

PostBy: DePippo79 On: Tue Oct 22, 2013 8:49 pm

I use charcoal because of ease, doesn't burn as violently as regular wood, and it keeps the small pieces of coal from falling through the grates. Keeping the mica clean is a added benefit. Matt
DePippo79
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Oak 40, Stanley Argand No. 30, Glenwood Modern Oak 114, Stanley Argand No. 20 missing parts.
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite. Stove and nut size.
Other Heating: Oil hot water.

Re: Lighting A Coal Stove (Different Question)

PostBy: DennisH On: Sat Oct 26, 2013 5:28 am

I start with charcoal, then wood. Once I get a nice deep bed of wood coals glowing, then layer on the coal. I have a forced air wood-coal furnace, so a pretty big firebox. After burning coal for a couple days, and multiple shakedowns, I go back to wood for 1/2 day because the wood coals will cause any unburned coal to ignite and burn. That allows me to have a real good shakedown, with no (or very little) unburned coal chunks in the grates.
DennisH
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Yukon-Eagle Klondike IV
Other Heating: Propane

Re: Lighting A Coal Stove (Different Question)

PostBy: dcrane On: Sat Oct 26, 2013 6:03 am

I too use left over wood pieces from odd jobs, I will usually cut up a bucket or two with the chop saw and make "chunks" as opposed to "lengths" (the reason for chunks is to enable the wood fire to make a nice even bed across the entire bottom surface of the grate without leaving any areas uncovered), I leave my bottom door open and only have to let it blaze like blow torch for about 5 minutes before I load it half way with coal (I leave the bottom door open for about another minute or two, then close it up and watch the magic)... after 15-30 minutes I will fully load my stove and leave a small opening to one side/corner where I can still see red glow (after closing her up and setting air controls and damper I can sit back for hours and watch the magic of coal gas igniting above the dark coal bed, most will only see the beautiful blues when they open their top door but I can watch the elegant dances through the glass of dancing flame across the underside of the top plate and volcanic eruptions of flame coming up through the exposed hole I left to one side... its like my very own light show toothy ).... needless to say I don't touch anything for 12 hours at that point... I wake up in morning and open bottom door for a few minutes then close it up... then shake it down good... then open top door and load it up full again... then sit back for 12 more hours and watch the light show!

Below is this morning upon waking up and opening bottom door for 2 minutes (but before the shake down)

If I can ever figure out how to get video from my phone to computer I will let you guys watch the light show with me sometime ;)
Coal is extremely easy to run and light with a few dry sticks/chunks... stokers were always far more delicate for me and the learning curve much more difficult (and the use of charcoal or an accelerant/mouse may be called for)... with a good manual feed I just never saw the need for this.
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dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

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