Help for a NOB?

Re: Help for a NOB?

PostBy: blrman07 On: Tue Nov 05, 2013 11:07 pm

I found and advertisement that states that the tube running down the center is the core of the name Hot Blast. It introduces air directly into the center section of burning soft coal or coke to ensure complete combustion of all the gases generated by the soft coal or coke. The advertisement states that it can burn any fuel soft coal, coke, wood, and hard anthracite coal without making any changes to the stove. The picture in the add shows a cutaway and artists rendering of that center air pipe in action. It looks pretty wild! :shock:

It does appear that this stove was designed to effectively burn soft coal but with that hot blast air tube thingy removed you should be able to burn hard coal very effectively.

Check out the advertisement

http://www.famhist.us/wp-content/upload ... p-1905.png

Rev. Larry
blrman07
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Bucket a Day
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vigilant Casting 2310
Baseburners & Antiques: rebuilding a 1906 March Brownback Double Heater, using a UMCO 1920's Pot Belly stove in the church
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Wood in the VC and anything that will fit in the Bucket a Day. It's not fussy.

Re: Help for a NOB?

PostBy: franco b On: Tue Nov 05, 2013 11:33 pm

You would want it in for hard coal as well to burn volatiles and CO. Just not open as far in the adjustment.
franco b
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: Help for a NOB?

PostBy: wsherrick On: Wed Nov 06, 2013 6:06 am

Cole's Hot Blast stoves are common in areas of the country that are abundant in Bituminous Coal. They along with Warm Mornings and other similar designs were sold in the untold thousands. Since you live in Colorado, this type of stove will work very well for you since the coal you will have available is Bituminous.
The tube extending from the top of the stove down to the fire pot is to deliver secondary air to burn off the hydrocarbons present in Bituminous. Secondary air increases the combustion efficiency of the stove and reduces smoke and soot formation.
These stoves can produce large amounts of heat and are primarily coal stoves. They weren't made for wood burning. It doesn't really matter anyway because once you start burning coal and experience the benefits of it, you will forget about wood burning.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

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Re: Help for a NOB?

PostBy: DaveH On: Wed Nov 06, 2013 8:23 am

McGiever wrote:First thing I notice...only bottom primary air control...no secondary...is this for anthracite?
:oops: Tricky, comes down from overhead to just above burning gases. :roll:


I think I may have made an assumption that this was a Cole, just based on the "Hot Blast" term and the center down draft tube. Heck, I dont know what it is and I guess it really doesnt matter so long as it makes some heat one day. I had set my hopes I would find a grand piece but alas not, just a little stove missing mostly trim bits.

I am now faced with the question of sucking up the few hundred I paid for it and making it a pretty little display piece rather than a functional piece, some times one should cut their losses and start over with a clearer vision. As a kid living in the Norwegian Rivera of MN, I cut and split enough wood to last me a lifetime. Now with the Beatle Kill that has happened out here, let alone the lifetime supply of wood deposited in our valley from the floods, one needs to reconsider wood / coal given the price of propane. It would end up being weekend / evening use for the most part

Am I at a "Do Over" point where I restart the search for one like shown in the Ebay link?
DaveH
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Coles Hot Blast New 13

Re: Help for a NOB?

PostBy: dcrane On: Wed Nov 06, 2013 8:39 am

the theory is pretty sound for this as a bit burner, more efficient for sure than warm mornings firebrick... it would be really interesting to see this stove in action! (does that secondary air pipe go right into the hot bed of coal OR sit just above the bed?)
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: Help for a NOB?

PostBy: DaveH On: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:22 am

blrman07 wrote:I found and advertisement that states that the tube running down the center is the core of the name Hot Blast. It introduces air directly into the center section of burning soft coal or coke to ensure complete combustion of all the gases generated by the soft coal or coke. The advertisement states that it can burn any fuel soft coal, coke, wood, and hard anthracite coal without making any changes to the stove. The picture in the add shows a cutaway and artists rendering of that center air pipe in action. It looks pretty wild! :shock:

It does appear that this stove was designed to effectively burn soft coal but with that hot blast air tube thingy removed you should be able to burn hard coal very effectively.

Check out the advertisement

http://www.famhist.us/wp-content/upload ... p-1905.png

Rev. Larry



I found the same ad..... the idea is intriguing but without knowing what the missing top cap looks like I cant figure out how it draws the air into the tube and from where. I look at a hole in the top of the stove now and can only imagine most of the flue gasses being deposited in the room!

Having zero experience with coal of any sort, I am lost on the technology but appriciate the idea.... if it actually works as suggested
DaveH
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Coles Hot Blast New 13

Re: Help for a NOB?

PostBy: blrman07 On: Wed Nov 06, 2013 9:43 am

Take the stove, set it up outside with a section of stovepipe on it and start a small wood fire in it. Next add some coal and see what the puppy does. It appears to be able to burn coal just fine exactly the way it sits. Test it out before you throw in the towel. You might get surprised.

Rev Larry
blrman07
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Bucket a Day
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vigilant Casting 2310
Baseburners & Antiques: rebuilding a 1906 March Brownback Double Heater, using a UMCO 1920's Pot Belly stove in the church
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Wood in the VC and anything that will fit in the Bucket a Day. It's not fussy.

Re: Help for a NOB?

PostBy: McGiever On: Wed Nov 06, 2013 11:51 am

DaveH wrote:
McGiever wrote:First thing I notice...only bottom primary air control...no secondary...is this for anthracite?
:oops: Tricky, comes down from overhead to just above burning gases. :roll:


I think I may have made an assumption that this was a Cole, just based on the "Hot Blast" term and the center down draft tube. Heck, I dont know what it is and I guess it really doesnt matter so long as it makes some heat one day. I had set my hopes I would find a grand piece but alas not, just a little stove missing mostly trim bits.

I am now faced with the question of sucking up the few hundred I paid for it and making it a pretty little display piece rather than a functional piece, some times one should cut their losses and start over with a clearer vision. As a kid living in the Norwegian Rivera of MN, I cut and split enough wood to last me a lifetime. Now with the Beatle Kill that has happened out here, let alone the lifetime supply of wood deposited in our valley from the floods, one needs to reconsider wood / coal given the price of propane. It would end up being weekend / evening use for the most part

Am I at a "Do Over" point where I restart the search for one like shown in the Ebay link?



If you had a source for Anthracite/Hard Coal where you are in those Colorado foothills, that stove could easily be made to work w/ that under grate air supply. Just need to remove center tube and blank or seal that hole. :)
McGiever
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AXEMAN-ANDERSON 130 "1959"
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: HARMAN MAGNUM
Hand Fed Coal Stove: RADIANT HOME AIR BLAST
Baseburners & Antiques: OUR GLENWOOD 111 BASEBURNER "1908"
Coal Size/Type: PEA / ANTHRACITE, NUT-STOVE / ANTHRACITE
Other Heating: Ground Source Heat Pump
Stove/Furnace Make: Hydro Heat /Mega Tek

Re: Help for a NOB?

PostBy: wsherrick On: Wed Nov 06, 2013 3:35 pm

This stove is a Coles. This stove is designed for Bituminous Coal. It's not a theory. The secondary air tube does work even though it isn't nearly as sophisticated as a Florence Hot Blast, for example. And why would one take out the secondary air tube to burn Anthracite when they live in an area that is abundant in inexpensive Bituminous Coal?
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Help for a NOB?

PostBy: McGiever On: Wed Nov 06, 2013 11:24 pm

wsherrick wrote:This stove is a Coles. This stove is designed for Bituminous Coal. It's not a theory. The secondary air tube does work even though it isn't nearly as sophisticated as a Florence Hot Blast, for example. And why would one take out the secondary air tube to burn Anthracite when they live in an area that is abundant in inexpensive Bituminous Coal?


He said it is missing a part for the secondary tube and he is giving up on using the stove. I knew he'd not likely find anthracite where he lives...it's too bad all his efforts was for not.
McGiever
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AXEMAN-ANDERSON 130 "1959"
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: HARMAN MAGNUM
Hand Fed Coal Stove: RADIANT HOME AIR BLAST
Baseburners & Antiques: OUR GLENWOOD 111 BASEBURNER "1908"
Coal Size/Type: PEA / ANTHRACITE, NUT-STOVE / ANTHRACITE
Other Heating: Ground Source Heat Pump
Stove/Furnace Make: Hydro Heat /Mega Tek

Re: Help for a NOB?

PostBy: blrman07 On: Wed Nov 06, 2013 11:53 pm

What part is he missing and what would should it look like? It doesn't look too complicated but then I'm sitting in NEPA behind a keyboard and not there looking at it and having never seen one I could be talking out my nether regions.

Rev. Larry
blrman07
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Bucket a Day
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vigilant Casting 2310
Baseburners & Antiques: rebuilding a 1906 March Brownback Double Heater, using a UMCO 1920's Pot Belly stove in the church
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Wood in the VC and anything that will fit in the Bucket a Day. It's not fussy.

Re: Help for a NOB?

PostBy: DaveH On: Thu Nov 07, 2013 7:53 am

I have searched for a supply source of coal locally but I am coming up empty on that.

Being as my knowledge is limited to wood burning, I am at a bit of a loss understanding this stove. In the final picture I posted in the first series, the cover with the cast in 5 13, opens and is not sealed in any way. Then there is the down daft tube area with the recess that appears a flat, non sealed cover would fit in. Finally there is the larger hole in the top left of that photo that a single peg of the nickel plated cap (for a lack of the correct term) fits into loosely. Lets just say that the upper portion of this fire box is anything but sealed in any way. Is it expected that there would be enough chimney draft that none of these openings would be an issue once a fire is started?

Lets say I give up on the idea of coal and use this as a wood burner. I still like the theory of the down draft tube to get a better burn of the smoke. I would think that a combination of air regulation would be required to balance between the lower draft control and this upper downdraft tube. Then again, I would have thought the upper regions of the firebox would be better sealed and I still have the 3/4" round hole and a non sealed fire box flap opening on the top. This top opening requires the nickel plated cap to be removed to open it... and that too makes little sense to me.... is it a cold box clean out access?

I suspect someone has a trim ring for the top seam to cap area from a stove that is beyond justifiable repair. I have seen the finisher pieces on ebay, and with this stove having little significance or value I suspect any finisher with semi correct proportions would look and do just fine. That is all trim fluff..... and I am still at the point of trying to understand this little stove. Given the small size of the direct fire box area, the small size of the ash pan area, and how well necked down the fire area is..... I highly question if wood is even an option.
DaveH
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Coles Hot Blast New 13

Re: Help for a NOB?

PostBy: McGiever On: Wed Nov 13, 2013 6:48 pm

This may be what is missing, the top sliding piece that looks like a long handled skillet...

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McGiever
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AXEMAN-ANDERSON 130 "1959"
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: HARMAN MAGNUM
Hand Fed Coal Stove: RADIANT HOME AIR BLAST
Baseburners & Antiques: OUR GLENWOOD 111 BASEBURNER "1908"
Coal Size/Type: PEA / ANTHRACITE, NUT-STOVE / ANTHRACITE
Other Heating: Ground Source Heat Pump
Stove/Furnace Make: Hydro Heat /Mega Tek

Re: Help for a NOB?

PostBy: nortcan On: Wed Nov 13, 2013 6:53 pm

Thanks, very interesting photos.
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

Re: Help for a NOB?

PostBy: nortcan On: Wed Nov 13, 2013 6:57 pm

Thanks, very interesting photos.
Would be very nice to see one of those burning anth and see if it makes some differnces on the blues combustion according to that top sliding dooradjustments.
nortcan
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride

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