After years of having the stove I burned some Bit.

After years of having the stove I burned some Bit.

PostBy: Stanb999 On: Fri Nov 08, 2013 3:22 pm

Well After years of thinking about it, asking about it, and wondering about it I got some bit to burn. I was out in western PA for work. The fella I got the pail from about (50 pounds) uses it in his outdoor burner like the ones for wood. He didn't tell me where he gets it I did ask, just said that it was local? to Philipsburg, Pa and I wouldn't know it anyway he said. He did say he gets it at the mine and the cost was 90 dollars for egg size.

First impressions...

It is some dirty stuff. Stinks like oily rags even in the pail with temps below freezing. Kinda shocking. The pail did in fact fall over in the back seat of the car. :mad:

Burning it,
I added it to a well established anthracite fire, that I had just shaken down. The issue right off the bat is... My god the smoke is yellow/orange. :P
It was really ok once it caught off but I had to leave the door open just a smidgen so more overfire air could be added. I also closed off the Baro with foil to keep the draft up with the door a bit open. After a half hour or so I was able to close the door fully. After an hour and a half I removed the foil from the baro once the flames settled. Finally just before bed I lowered the damper to the "normal" setting. The next morning I broke up the big lump but didn't have to add coal. Early evening the stove had mostly died down so I shook it down and added the rest of the Bit that was in the pail. This made the fire go well into the next morning. When I added anthracite on top.

Impressions of burning,
It was kinda like you all said, It needs more air to burn especially early on.
It smoked a bunch, but the smell was mostly in the stove(the wife would disagree).
I loved the heat output, Seemed much higher than with Anthracite and lasted as least as long. IMHO it put out more heat But I have no way to prove it.

The final results.
The stove would need a secondary air control installed for burning bit full time.
Bit gives better heat output for the dollar without a doubt.
I would burn it full time if it was available locally.
Stanb999
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harmon
Stove/Furnace Model: Mark II

Re: After years of having the stove I burned some Bit.

PostBy: Duengeon master On: Sat Nov 09, 2013 3:28 pm

If your neighbors are not right next door, burning bit is much more economical after the learning curve and you get the hang of it. Keeping more secondary (top) air helps considerably when burning bit. I wouldn't leave the door open though. A puff back will fill your house with plenty of soot. When you go to straight bit, take your shovel and shovel the fire to one side of the stove. Then add bit to the other side. This will keep a red spot and keep the fire burning cleaner.
Duengeon master
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harmon Mark III
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite pea and nut mix. Bituminous lump

Re: After years of having the stove I burned some Bit.

PostBy: Lightning On: Sat Nov 09, 2013 3:49 pm

I ran bit for about a week. It was very demanding and needed a lot of attention. I had a less than stellar experience with it. The first two hours after loading fresh, the fire would rage and would rebel with puff backs if I tried to control it. Heat output would fluctuate thru the burn cycle, first too hot, then only mediocre after that. After a few days I got better at it with altering my loading technique. I wasn't pleased with the amount of soot that accumulated on the fire box either. It even choked my pipe's diameter down. I've been told I would have better results with other bit coal. The characteristics vary depending on what type it is. I'd be interested in trying it again but I'm afraid I've been spoiled with anthracite :lol:

Here's a thread I documented my experience on it
Trying the Bitty Coal Again
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Stove Size Mix


Re: After years of having the stove I burned some Bit.

PostBy: Stanb999 On: Sat Nov 09, 2013 11:06 pm

Duengeon master wrote:If your neighbors are not right next door, burning bit is much more economical after the learning curve and you get the hang of it. Keeping more secondary (top) air helps considerably when burning bit. I wouldn't leave the door open though. A puff back will fill your house with plenty of soot. When you go to straight bit, take your shovel and shovel the fire to one side of the stove. Then add bit to the other side. This will keep a red spot and keep the fire burning cleaner.



Not opening the door wasn't really an option. I wasn't going to drill a hole few holes in the stove for an experiment. A back puff even if small would have really been bad.
Stanb999
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harmon
Stove/Furnace Model: Mark II

Re: After years of having the stove I burned some Bit.

PostBy: Stanb999 On: Sat Nov 09, 2013 11:12 pm

Lightning wrote:
Here's a thread I documented my experience on it
Trying the Bitty Coal Again


Thanks I'll be reading up. I don't think I'll get more Bit. I'd have to buy a truck load for it to work out cash wise and I don't know enough of what to ask for to spend 2 grand on an experiment with it.
Stanb999
 
Stove/Furnace Make: Harmon
Stove/Furnace Model: Mark II