What does this mean, if anything?

What does this mean, if anything?

PostBy: Carbon12 On: Tue Nov 12, 2013 7:49 pm

OK, 2500 square foot house. Walk out basement and one floor above. Partially finished basement. Built in 80s. Have the KA6 in boiler room in basement. Have door in boiler room open to allow heat out of the boiler room to the finished part of basement. As an experiment, I opened the window which is 6 feet from boiler. The draft over the fire remained essentially the same both when idling and firing. The barometric damper opened considerably when I opened the window and closed back down when I closed the window. I waited about 10 minutes after opening the window to let house pressure equalize a bit. What, if anything does this indicate? Should I close the door to the boiler room and crack the window in the boiler room? I'm assuming with the window closed and the boiler room door open sufficient combustion air is available. Scratching my head on this one! Lol!
Carbon12
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite
Other Heating: Heat Pump/Forced Hot Air Oil Furnace

Re: What does this mean, if anything?

PostBy: lsayre On: Tue Nov 12, 2013 7:57 pm

Carbon12 wrote:OK, 2500 square foot house. Walk out basement and one floor above. Partially finished basement. Built in 80s. Have the KA6 in boiler room in basement. Have door in boiler room open to allow heat out of the boiler room to the finished part of basement. As an experiment, I opened the window which is 6 feet from boiler. The draft over the fire remained essentially the same both when idling and firing. The barometric damper opened considerably when I opened the window and closed back down when I closed the window. I waited about 10 minutes after opening the window to let house pressure equalize a bit. What, if anything does this indicate? Should I close the door to the boiler room and crack the window in the boiler room? I'm assuming with the window closed and the boiler room door open sufficient combustion air is available. Scratching my head on this one! Lol!


I would leave the boiler room door open and also open the window a bit. I would also take the boiler room door off its hinge pins and remove it altogether so no one ever accidentally closes it. Let the boiler breathe.
lsayre
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AHS S130 Coal Gun
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Pea
Other Heating: Resistance Boiler (It has been fixed!)

Re: What does this mean, if anything?

PostBy: Carbon12 On: Tue Nov 12, 2013 8:10 pm

I'm still perplexed that the draft over the fire didn't move much from ideal settings upon opening the window and the barometric damper opening to nearly full open. Colder, denser air resulting in more draft over the fire so the damper opened more to compensate maintaining the set draft over the fire???
Carbon12
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite
Other Heating: Heat Pump/Forced Hot Air Oil Furnace

Visit Lehigh Anthracite

Re: What does this mean, if anything?

PostBy: lsayre On: Tue Nov 12, 2013 8:26 pm

Carbon12 wrote:I'm still perplexed that the draft over the fire didn't move much from ideal settings upon opening the window and the barometric damper opening to nearly full open. Colder, denser air resulting in more draft over the fire so the damper opened more to compensate maintaining the set draft over the fire???


Put aluminum foil over your baro damper and then watch your manometer as you open and then close the window. If the manometer metered draft generally goes up when the window is open and down when it is closed, I would think that indicates that the fire in your boiler is sucking the air pressure right out of your boiler room, and creating a lower pressure environment therein which effectively reduces the differential between the chimneys (reduced) pressure and the rooms pressure, thus causing the manometer to indicate reduced chimney draw. If that is the case, your boiler could very well be starving for air. That could result in more CO than you want or need.

Where is Sting when we need him? He understands this issue well.
lsayre
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AHS S130 Coal Gun
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Pea
Other Heating: Resistance Boiler (It has been fixed!)

Re: What does this mean, if anything?

PostBy: Carbon12 On: Tue Nov 12, 2013 8:59 pm

Put foil over Baro damper. Opened the window near the boiler and the draft over the fire went up noticeably. Close the window and the draft went down. When I opened a window at the far end of the basement rather than right next to the boiler, the draft over the fire went up but not nearly as much. 5 MPH winds here blowing more or less against the side of the house with the windows. Maybe I need to wait for calm winds???
Carbon12
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite
Other Heating: Heat Pump/Forced Hot Air Oil Furnace

Re: What does this mean, if anything?

PostBy: Carbon12 On: Tue Nov 12, 2013 9:01 pm

Boiler has been burning well for several weeks. Granola ash with very little unburnt coal.
Last edited by Carbon12 on Tue Nov 12, 2013 10:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Carbon12
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite
Other Heating: Heat Pump/Forced Hot Air Oil Furnace

Re: What does this mean, if anything?

PostBy: Carbon12 On: Tue Nov 12, 2013 9:02 pm

Wait, I'll stick a digital CO detector in the Baro damper and take a reading! :roll:
Carbon12
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite
Other Heating: Heat Pump/Forced Hot Air Oil Furnace

Re: What does this mean, if anything?

PostBy: oliver power On: Tue Nov 12, 2013 9:05 pm

Something sounds funny about that situation. I'm going to throw out a thought here. A barometric damper opens with excess draw from chimney. However, being in a small boiler room, maybe the rush of cool air from the window, created enough positive pressure, it pushed the barometric damper open. Just a thought. Oliver
oliver power
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: KEYSTOKER Kaa-2
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93 & 30-95, Vigilant (pre-Vigilant-II)
Baseburners & Antiques: MANY (Mostly when burning wood)
Stove/Furnace Make: HITZER / KEYSTOKER
Stove/Furnace Model: 50-93 & 30-95 , Kaa-2

Re: What does this mean, if anything?

PostBy: Carbon12 On: Tue Nov 12, 2013 9:08 pm

I know,...right??? Very strange.
Carbon12
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite
Other Heating: Heat Pump/Forced Hot Air Oil Furnace

Re: What does this mean, if anything?

PostBy: Carbon12 On: Tue Nov 12, 2013 9:32 pm

I repeated the foil over Baro damper but this time with the boiler motors switched off. No combustion fan, no stoker fan. Opened window, draft over the fire went up. A breeze was blowing in the window. I'm guessing the wind is pressurizing the room and forcing more air up the chimney through the stoker and the Baro damper. Or rather, allowing more air to be sucked up the chimney. Two story masonry chimney completely inside the heated space.
Last edited by Carbon12 on Tue Nov 12, 2013 9:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Carbon12
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite
Other Heating: Heat Pump/Forced Hot Air Oil Furnace

Re: What does this mean, if anything?

PostBy: lsayre On: Tue Nov 12, 2013 9:32 pm

Carbon12 wrote:Put foil over Baro damper. Opened the window near the boiler and the draft over the fire went up noticeably. Close the window and the draft went down. When I opened a window at the far end of the basement rather than right next to the boiler, the draft over the fire went up but not nearly as much. 5 MPH winds here blowing more or less against the side of the house with the windows. Maybe I need to wait for calm winds???


This seems to confirm my conjecture.
lsayre
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AHS S130 Coal Gun
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Pea
Other Heating: Resistance Boiler (It has been fixed!)

Re: What does this mean, if anything?

PostBy: Carbon12 On: Tue Nov 12, 2013 9:46 pm

Will wait to hear what sting has to say. With the blower motors off and a relatively small volume of coal burning on the stoker grate the amount of air needed for combustion and draft shouldn't equate to the stiff breeze I felt coming through the open window. Or maybe it would??? The ceiling of the boiler room is insulated (I was thinking of removing that insulation to heat the floor above from the boilers radiant and convective heat loss) I could conceivably close the door to the boiler room and open the nearby window enough to supply adequate combustion air, if necessary.
Carbon12
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite
Other Heating: Heat Pump/Forced Hot Air Oil Furnace

Re: What does this mean, if anything?

PostBy: Carbon12 On: Wed Nov 13, 2013 9:58 am

Going to do more experimenting today
Carbon12
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite
Other Heating: Heat Pump/Forced Hot Air Oil Furnace

Re: What does this mean, if anything?

PostBy: Carbon12 On: Fri Nov 15, 2013 2:19 pm

Repeated experiment with opening window and door near boiler and observing changes in the draft over the fire and the opening of the Baro. On a calm day, the draft barely changed over the fire when I opened the window and then a door near the boiler. The Baro didn't open at all when I opened the window and door. I guess the other night the wind was blowing in the window and pressurizing the boiler room. Still very interesting to me. Stoker is still burning well :)
Carbon12
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite
Other Heating: Heat Pump/Forced Hot Air Oil Furnace

Re: What does this mean, if anything?

PostBy: Lightning On: Fri Nov 15, 2013 6:45 pm

The dynamics of wind against a structure are influential on chimney draft. If the wind is hitting the house on the same side the open window is on, it should pressurize the room slightly. The added pressure will find a way to equalize by going thru the baro. But if wind is hitting the opposite side the window is on, a low pressure area will form on that side and could weaken the draft. I have vents on two sides of my basement to try to keep pressure equal no matter what way the wind is blowing.. I open them when during warm weather burns.

Chimney dynamics with wind are interesting too.. When crosswinds hit the chimney from any direction, a bubble of lower pressure is formed on the opposing side of the chimney that help pull flue gases up and out.. 8-)
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Stove Size Mix

Visit Lehigh Anthracite