Cookin' with coal

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Lightning On: Sun Dec 08, 2013 4:33 pm

Paul, That's awesome :D
Beautiful stove!!
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Stove Size Mix

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Sun Dec 08, 2013 4:41 pm

When using these stoves does it make you feel like you have gone back in time and you are experiencing life as it was 100 years ago? It sure does when I cook on mine! Last January, I decided to go one month using only the cook stove for hot water, cooking, & heat because I wanted to see what it felt like to live back then. It was a lot of work because I had to carry all the water out to the detached garage but I really did not seem to mind it when I got use to it. It just seemed to become a fact of life. I was still working full time back then so it was a bit more difficult to do than it would be now but I even took sponge baths out there to use the hot water. These stoves were the "HEART" of many homes and real workhorses. It is so nice to see them put back into service because I believe they can save a household a lot of money with just a little more work.

It is nice to see the jam being made the old fashioned way!
Randy
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, & Kineo #15 base heater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: wsherrick On: Sun Dec 08, 2013 4:43 pm

Super neat. I love peach preserves, hint, hint.
This reminds me greatly of my childhood. It makes me very homesick. My mother and grandmother made the best jelly. I would go down to the Hatchie River Bottom to a secret place I knew. There was a bountiful Muscadine Vine which produced gallons of large, ruby red Muscadines. We also had a big black berry patch down there. Mother would make the best jelly and jam from those. The house would be filled with the glorious aroma of the jelly being made.
Alas, that place and time is lost forever. It only lives in my memory.

You have something very precious there. Treasure it.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

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Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Sun Dec 08, 2013 5:12 pm

wsherrick wrote:Super neat. I love peach preserves, hint, hint.
This reminds me greatly of my childhood. It makes me very homesick. My mother and grandmother made the best jelly. I would go down to the Hatchie River Bottom to a secret place I knew. There was a bountiful Muscadine Vine which produced gallons of large, ruby red Muscadines. We also had a big black berry patch down there. Mother would make the best jelly and jam from those. The house would be filled with the glorious aroma of the jelly being made.
Alas, that place and time is lost forever. It only lives in my memory.

You have something very precious there. Treasure it.


:D Get on line ! :D

Great memories !

There may still be hidden places like that. A few years back, the girlfriend and I were fishing along the upper Hudson. She found a wild grape tree. The fish weren't biting so we picked a couple of Wal-Mart bags almost full of grapes. Like you said, the house smells great as the grapes were cooking down. And, that was better than any store-bought grape jelly I've ever had !!!!!

Yes, she is, both of them ! ;)
Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Sun Dec 08, 2013 6:16 pm

Photog200 wrote:When using these stoves does it make you feel like you have gone back in time and you are experiencing life as it was 100 years ago? It sure does when I cook on mine! Last January, I decided to go one month using only the cook stove for hot water, cooking, & heat because I wanted to see what it felt like to live back then. It was a lot of work because I had to carry all the water out to the detached garage but I really did not seem to mind it when I got use to it. It just seemed to become a fact of life. I was still working full time back then so it was a bit more difficult to do than it would be now but I even took sponge baths out there to use the hot water. These stoves were the "HEART" of many homes and real workhorses. It is so nice to see them put back into service because I believe they can save a household a lot of money with just a little more work.

It is nice to see the jam being made the old fashioned way!
Randy



Randy, using this old stove makes me think about, and better understand, what life was like for my grand parents when these stoves were new. And it reminds me of stories my father told of his growing up in houses with coal heat. I guess you could call it almost living history, . . . which I've done before as a volunteer-in-costume at Old Bethpage Village on Long Island back in the early 1970's.

I've also gained by listening to the girl friend remember what her life was like living in a big old house, in West Massachusetts winters as a child with only a coal range and parlor stove for heat and cooking. She remembers as a kid taking baths in the kitchen in a wash tub next to the stove, with water heated on the stove. It was not only the warmest place in the house, but as you found out, the less distance you have to lug water, the better. She also remembers how great it felt to get into warm footy PJ's that had been hanging just behind the stove.

However, to truly feel like I'm back doing the living history part, I think I'd need William's help with my wardrobe ! :)

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Sun Dec 08, 2013 6:58 pm

Sunny Boy wrote:
Photog200 wrote:When using these stoves does it make you feel like you have gone back in time and you are experiencing life as it was 100 years ago? It sure does when I cook on mine! Last January, I decided to go one month using only the cook stove for hot water, cooking, & heat because I wanted to see what it felt like to live back then. It was a lot of work because I had to carry all the water out to the detached garage but I really did not seem to mind it when I got use to it. It just seemed to become a fact of life. I was still working full time back then so it was a bit more difficult to do than it would be now but I even took sponge baths out there to use the hot water. These stoves were the "HEART" of many homes and real workhorses. It is so nice to see them put back into service because I believe they can save a household a lot of money with just a little more work.

It is nice to see the jam being made the old fashioned way!
Randy



Randy, using this old stove makes me think about, and better understand, what life was like for my grand parents when these stoves were new. And it reminds me of stories my father told of his growing up in houses with coal heat. I guess you could call it almost living history, . . . which I've done before as a volunteer-in-costume at Old Bethpage Village on Long Island back in the early 1970's.
I too have learned a lot about these cook stoves through my father who grew up with one on the farm. They fueled theirs with wood though, being on the farm, they cut all of their own wood for the cook stove and a huge round oak stove in the living room.

I've also gained by listening to the girl friend remember what her life was like living in a big old house, in West Massachusetts winters as a child with only a coal range and parlor stove for heat and cooking. She remembers as a kid taking baths in the kitchen in a wash tub next to the stove, with water heated on the stove. It was not only the warmest place in the house, but as you found out, the less distance you have to lug water, the better. She also remembers how great it felt to get into warm footy PJ's that had been hanging just behind the stove.
Dad said the same thing about taking baths in the kitchen next to the stove. They did not have running water when they first moved into the farm house so they had to carry the water in from the well. (I guess I should not complain about carrying water just to the garage).

However, to truly feel like I'm back doing the living history part, I think I'd need William's help with my wardrobe ! :)
I wish I had half of the information that William has about stoves, architecture, antiques and vintage clothing.

Randy
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, & Kineo #15 base heater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Sun Dec 15, 2013 7:10 pm

Yesterday I spent all afternoon canning potatoes...running back and forth from the house to put more wood on the fire. Well, last night we got a snow storm and high winds so when the last batch of canning got done for the night, I loaded the stove with coal. I love it, set it and not have to go back for several hours and that is usually just to check on it.

This morning still had lots of coal left burning so loaded her up again and canned one more batch of potatoes today. The coal fire did not seem to get as hot as the wood and it took longer but it is so nice to not have to run out there every 45 min to put more wood in. Can't wait to get all this wood burnt up so I can start using coal exclusively.

Randy
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, & Kineo #15 base heater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Sun Dec 15, 2013 9:06 pm

Randy, Hope you didn't get too buried up there in snow country.

Potatoes huh ? That sounds interesting. How do you prep them ? Cooked plain, or do you add things to them ?

The girlfriend found a sale on pineapples. We were supposed to can them today, but we were out clearing snow and then family dropping by and bumped that to tomorrow's schedule.

And, the snow brought out more things for "Cookin' with coal". While heating the kitchen, and with a ham baking in the oven, and pineapple sauce simmering on the stove top, we used the range's warming shelves and swing-out trivets to quickly dry wet gloves and hats. Plus, the heat radiated by the flues passing around and under the water tank, to dry our boots.

Warm, wonderful smells to come in to from a few hours clearing snow. :D

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Sun Dec 15, 2013 9:43 pm

Sunny Boy wrote:Randy, Hope you didn't get too buried up there in snow country.

Potatoes huh ? That sounds interesting. How do you prep them ? Cooked plain, or do you add things to them ?

The girlfriend found a sale on pineapples. We were supposed to can them today, but we were out clearing snow and then family dropping by and bumped that to tomorrow's schedule.

And, the snow brought out more things for "Cookin' with coal". While heating the kitchen, and with a ham baking in the oven, and pineapple sauce simmering on the stove top, we used the range's warming shelves and swing-out trivets to quickly dry wet gloves and hats. Plus, the heat radiated by the flues passing around and under the water tank, to dry our boots.

Warm, wonderful smells to come in to from a few hours clearing snow. :D

Paul

Last week I made some dried plum bread and the smells that made were awesome. I can imagine the smells from the ham and pineapple!

I had not posted in here for a while because I have been trying to use up some wood in the shed. I did not feel it would be "ethical" to post about the things I have been cooking since using wood.

As for the potatoes...Mom & Dad bought 100# of potatoes. They thought they would share with the kids. Well, I had already bought some and my sister doesn't even like potatoes. To make a long story short, Mom was concerned they were going to go bad. I volunteered to can some for them and they were really happy about that. I canned 12 quarts for them and 8 for me (with the potatoes I bought) I only peeled and diced them up...put them in the jar. Put 1/4 tsp salt and 1 tsp lemon juice and filled to 1" of top with water. Then put in pressure cooker...when jiggling starts, 15 minutes and done. They are good for soup, stews etc. But let me tell you, I now know what KP duty is like peeling all those potatoes! :)
Randy
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, & Kineo #15 base heater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Sun Dec 15, 2013 10:12 pm

Last time I saw a 100 pound sack of potatoes, they had been dumped in the middle of a mess hall kitchen floor with myself and four other guys sitting around working our way through pealing a pile four feet high. I think that much pealing would cripple me today ! :D

Yeah, the smell of slow baking carried through out the house by the heat of the stove is fantastic.

I've gotta get braver at trying to make different breads. While the canning is going on tomorrow, I'm gonna try a new-for-me Irish soda bread recipe experiment baking in the oven. That was supposed to be part two of todays stove projects that got bumped to tomorrow.

Should go even better than the white bread did with the jams we made. :D

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Sun Dec 15, 2013 10:29 pm

Sunny Boy wrote:Last time I saw a 100 pound sack of potatoes, they had been dumped in the middle of a mess hall kitchen floor with myself and four other guys sitting around working our way through pealing a pile four feet high. I think that much pealing would cripple me today ! :D

Yeah, the smell of slow baking carried through out the house by the heat of the stove is fantastic.

I've gotta get braver at trying to make different breads. While the canning is going on tomorrow, I'm gonna try a new-for-me Irish soda bread recipe experiment baking in the oven. That was supposed to be part two of todays stove projects that got bumped to tomorrow.

Should go even better than the white bread did with the jams we made. :D

Paul

I am still learning the best ways to bake in the oven. I have found that if I make bread to not put it on the rack. They seem to burn before they get done. I have been putting them in the bottom of the oven and that seems to work best.

Tomorrow, I am going to look at and probably buy a farmhouse kitchen sink ( old cast iron with drain boards on each end). I am going to install it out in the garage next spring along with a hand water pump so I do not have to carry water out to the garage. Even when I put the addition on the house, this pump will still work in the event we have a power outage and I don't have water. This will make my work out in the garage a lot better for the next year or two before I can get the room built.

Good luck tomorrow on canning the pineapple!
Randy
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, & Kineo #15 base heater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: windyhill4.2 On: Mon Dec 16, 2013 8:46 am

Sunny Boy wrote:Randy, Hope you didn't get too buried up there in snow country.

Potatoes huh ? That sounds interesting. How do you prep them ? Cooked plain, or do you add things to them ?

The girlfriend found a sale on pineapples. We were supposed to can them today, but we were out clearing snow and then family dropping by and bumped that to tomorrow's schedule.

And, the snow brought out more things for "Cookin' with coal". While heating the kitchen, and with a ham baking in the oven, and pineapple sauce simmering on the stove top, we used the range's warming shelves and swing-out trivets to quickly dry wet gloves and hats. Plus, the heat radiated by the flues passing around and under the water tank, to dry our boots.

Warm, wonderful smells to come in to from a few hours clearing snow. :D

Paul

Try doing all those things with a modern gas/electric range!!!!!!!!!! & you were heating the house too!! Makes me impatient to get our own coal range.Did you guys get much snow ? we had about 6" topped with 1/2" crust, made the F250 Super Duty work hard pushing that stuff off our 400' drive & parking areas.Good to here more on this thread again,thanks
windyhill4.2
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404 with variable blower
Other Heating: Oaktree OWB 600K

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Mon Dec 16, 2013 8:58 am

David,

Nah, we only got about 8-10 inches out of that last storm.

We don't get as much as Randy. That Maine-built Clarion pumps out so much heat, not much snow makes it down here ! :D

But, those Nor-Easters are brutal here. Guess there aren't any Maine-built kitchen ranges left in Maine ? :D

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Mon Dec 16, 2013 9:02 am

windyhill4.2 wrote:
Sunny Boy wrote:Randy, Hope you didn't get too buried up there in snow country.

Potatoes huh ? That sounds interesting. How do you prep them ? Cooked plain, or do you add things to them ?

The girlfriend found a sale on pineapples. We were supposed to can them today, but we were out clearing snow and then family dropping by and bumped that to tomorrow's schedule.

And, the snow brought out more things for "Cookin' with coal". While heating the kitchen, and with a ham baking in the oven, and pineapple sauce simmering on the stove top, we used the range's warming shelves and swing-out trivets to quickly dry wet gloves and hats. Plus, the heat radiated by the flues passing around and under the water tank, to dry our boots.

Warm, wonderful smells to come in to from a few hours clearing snow. :D

Paul

Try doing all those things with a modern gas/electric range!!!!!!!!!! & you were heating the house too!! Makes me impatient to get our own coal range.Did you guys get much snow ? we had about 6" topped with 1/2" crust, made the F250 Super Duty work hard pushing that stuff off our 400' drive & parking areas.Good to here more on this thread again,thanks

We got about the same amount of snow. So far we have been lucky, the snow has been going North of here. The Tug Hill area got hammered though.
David, you will love having one of these stoves. Mine is one of my prized possessions, I hope I never have to give it up.
Randy
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, & Kineo #15 base heater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Mon Dec 16, 2013 9:11 am

Sunny Boy wrote:David,

Nah, we only got about 8-10 inches out of that last storm.

We don't get as much as Randy. That Maine-built Clarion pumps out so much heat, not much snow makes it down here ! :D

But, those Nor-Easters are brutal here. Guess there aren't any Maine-built kitchen ranges left in Maine ? :D

Paul

You got more snow out of the last storm than we did!

Before I got my stove, I saw a "Modern Clarion" listed on Craigs List in the town of Richland. That is when I fell in love with the design. I e-mailed the listing twice and never got a reply so I started my quest elsewhere and found mine in Maine. I rented a pickup truck and drove there in a terrible snow storm but I got it home! The nice thing is, I got this one for half of what they were asking for the one locally...and they are still advertising it for sale a year later.

I will get a good hot fire going for you today so you should not get any snow! :D
Randy
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, & Kineo #15 base heater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

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