Cookin' with coal

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: lobsterman On: Fri Dec 23, 2016 11:21 am

Sunny, I would try sous vide on your next steak, look it up. Once you try it you will never cook meat another way. A good cut of steak will take about an hour or 2 at 130. Impossible to over cook. Can adjust between rare/medium/well (well done should be banned IMO) by adjusting temp, not cooking time. The connective tissue will break down without overheating the protein. All moisture is retained. It is fully cooked but desired pink/red inside. Tender beyond belief. More flavorful. Still needs finishing in hot pan or open flame. But this takes just a minute or so per side. Try it and you will be hooked. Promise.
lobsterman
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Chubby, 1980 Fully restored by Larry Trainer
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Chubby Jr, early model with removable grates

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Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: lobsterman On: Fri Dec 23, 2016 11:29 am

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Bone in rack of ribs. Tender as brisket.
Last edited by lobsterman on Fri Dec 23, 2016 11:34 am, edited 1 time in total.
lobsterman
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Chubby, 1980 Fully restored by Larry Trainer
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Chubby Jr, early model with removable grates

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: lobsterman On: Fri Dec 23, 2016 11:32 am

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A lesser cut of venison steak made mouth-watering tender.
lobsterman
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Chubby, 1980 Fully restored by Larry Trainer
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Chubby Jr, early model with removable grates

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Fri Dec 23, 2016 11:49 am

I've done the slow cook with cheap, tough cuts of meat for stew. I'll give it a try with a steak.

A coal range really is ideal for any type of slow cooking - either on the stove top, or in the oven - because there are a number of ways to regulate the cooking temps of both.

With about 8 square feet to cook on, the cook top surface temps vary about 400F naturally just by varying the placement of the pot/pan.

However, the most common method for long, low-temp cooking of meat is to use covered cast iron pots/pans and prop the oven door open partway. Unlike any other stove design, having the oven door open for long times does not cause problems with fire control, or the draft. If anything, it's 5+ square feet of flue heated walls and floor, just adds more heat to the house.

And having the oven walls hotter than the oven air keeps meat cooking vapors from condensing on the walls - like a gas or electric stove would because their walls are cooler than the oven air. So, there's no need to clean coal/wood stove ovens unless something boils over, or spills. We keep a cheap, half-sheet baking pan in the bottom of the oven to catch any spills.

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: lobsterman On: Fri Dec 23, 2016 12:07 pm

Slow cooking is great, I have done lots of it, mostly stew as you say. However, sous vide is subtly different. You must have PRECISE control of the temperature because this controls the outcome, not the cook time. A digital food thermometer is essential. The expensive fancy cooker is not needed. Your stove top would be mint. I just use a covered lobster pot on a precision gas burner.
lobsterman
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Chubby, 1980 Fully restored by Larry Trainer
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Chubby Jr, early model with removable grates

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: blrman07 On: Tue Jan 10, 2017 10:17 am

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My kitchen stove is a small stove on propane. I have it hooked up to the little bottles like you have on a BBQ grill. When it gets low AND it gets cold outside it doesn't have enough umph to get a burner going other than low.

I wanted some eggs this morning so I got my skillet, put two eggs in it and set it on my Vigilant Casting stove. Worked great, eggs tasted and cooked perfectly!!!
blrman07
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Bucket a Day
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vigilant Casting 2310
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Wood in the VC and anything that will fit in the Bucket a Day. It's not fussy.

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Tue Jan 10, 2017 10:31 am

There ya go, Rev, welcome to cooking with coal. Why not make the most of the heat source, right ? ;)

Does that top surface get hot enough to heat up a kettle for a hot beverage ?

Looks like you have room to do more cooking at the same time. Maybe hash browns, bacon, or sausage to go with those eggs ?

And add a trivet of some type and you can use that heat to slow cook on it like a crock pot.

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: lobsterman On: Tue Jan 10, 2017 3:53 pm

Very interesting to see what kind of temp one would reach with a big pot on top of a trivet. I am going to try it.
lobsterman
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Chubby, 1980 Fully restored by Larry Trainer
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Chubby Jr, early model with removable grates

Visit Hitzer Stoves

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: lobsterman On: Tue Jan 10, 2017 4:33 pm

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Just warming up the pot in case I get hungry.
lobsterman
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Chubby, 1980 Fully restored by Larry Trainer
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Chubby Jr, early model with removable grates

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Tue Jan 10, 2017 5:29 pm

lobsterman wrote:Very interesting to see what kind of temp one would reach with a big pot on top of a trivet. I am going to try it.



How much change in cooking temp depends on the design of the trivet, or "simmering plate" that is used. Some are more open and don't transfer as much heat, some sit low, some hold the pot/pan higher off the heat.

Others like the simmering plate in the pictures, that was with my range when we bought it, tend to trap and transfer a bit more heat. It will reduce the cooking surface temp about 40F to 50 F lower than the stove's cook top under it.

Comes in handy for whenever we want to run the stove hotter to bake with, but don't want to over heat a pot of stew. Building up the fire to get the oven over 400F can make the lowest temp round cover too hot for slow cooking meat stews. This simmering plate drops the temp just enough that food is not sticking and burning in the bottom of the pot. Plus, the round cover lifting handle works with it, making it much easier to move the plate around, or take it off the stove while it's hot. It's the perfect size fit for the 8-1/2 diameter round covers of my range. I see them occasionally on eBay.

The cooling rack next to it in the pictures drops the temps much more because of it's more open design.

This was covered further back in this thread and some of the guys reported on what they were using as trivets and what the results were.

Paul
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Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: lobsterman On: Tue Jan 10, 2017 5:54 pm

That looks like a useful rig! I am thinking of going classic cast. Can use inside Dutch to keep meat off of bottom of pan and for my app, sous vide, where I need quite a low temp maybe stack 2.
lobsterman
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Chubby, 1980 Fully restored by Larry Trainer
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Chubby Jr, early model with removable grates

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: lobsterman On: Tue Jan 10, 2017 7:04 pm

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lobsterman
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Chubby, 1980 Fully restored by Larry Trainer
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Chubby Jr, early model with removable grates

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: lobsterman On: Tue Jan 10, 2017 8:13 pm

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Somedays ya just got a cravin' for Venison burger.
lobsterman
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Chubby, 1980 Fully restored by Larry Trainer
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Chubby Jr, early model with removable grates

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: corey On: Sat Jan 14, 2017 7:58 am

Next time it gets cold out I believe it's time to cook a big pot of soup beans on to of my Ashley. Food looks good guys.
corey
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: USS Ashley coal stove
Coal Size/Type: Eastern KY bituminous

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Sat Jan 14, 2017 11:10 am

corey wrote:Next time it gets cold out I believe it's time to cook a big pot of soup beans on to of my Ashley. Food looks good guys.


Check often until you learn what temps the stove top is capable of producing inside the cook ware. It's a bit different than cooking on a modern gas, or electric stove. You can't see flame, or glowing electric coils, or have a dial to set the stove top heat to, so it's tough to know how hot the stove top really is. That's why I keep an IR gun near the kitchen range to use during cooking on the stove top. Old timers used to spit on the stove top and learned how hot it was by how fast the spit reacted to the heat. With my upbringing, that seems like major disrespect to the stove to me ! :D

If your running the stove hotter during really cold days, you may need to put the pot/pan up on something like a trivet, or something else that can withstand high temps. Sometimes it only takes something as thin as a piece of wire grill from like a Weber BBQ grill to lower the pot temps enough to keep food from burning during a long cooking spell. One stove owner used rolled and twisted piece of aluminum foil to make a coil to sit the pot on. Small chain laid in a coil can work, too.


And don't assume all of the top surface is the same temp. It can vary and that can help by giving you a choice of different areas to cook on. ;)

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Visit Hitzer Stoves