Cookin' with coal

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Carbon12 On: Wed Feb 12, 2014 11:27 am

Click add image, wait a couple of seconds then hot submit. The image will not appear in the submit screen. It will on the forum, however
Carbon12
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite
Other Heating: Heat Pump/Forced Hot Air Oil Furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: SWPaDon On: Wed Feb 12, 2014 11:29 am

Sixkids wrote:Trying to post a picture of our new stove, but when I clink the picture I want and then click 'add the file' the wordage next to browse, (telling the 'name' of my picture), goes away and nothing happens. :(

Be sure not to have any periods, commas, question marks or any punctuation in the file name. Some sites won't accept them(not sure about this one).
SWPaDon
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1600M
Coal Size/Type: Bituminous. Labeled as 'Big Vein', about the size of acorns. Makes a lot of ash, but heats well and lasts longer than my previous coal.

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: SWPaDon On: Wed Feb 12, 2014 11:49 am

One last thing to check is the file ext. itself. Is your picture a '.gif ' '.jpeg' '.jpg ?

There are a list of allowable extensions in the upload area.
SWPaDon
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1600M
Coal Size/Type: Bituminous. Labeled as 'Big Vein', about the size of acorns. Makes a lot of ash, but heats well and lasts longer than my previous coal.

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Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Wed Feb 12, 2014 12:03 pm

Sixkids wrote:Trying to post a picture of our new stove, but when I clink the picture I want and then click 'add the file' the wordage next to browse, (telling the 'name' of my picture), goes away and nothing happens. :(



After picking the picture and seeing it's name of the file appear in the box, . . did you click, "Open" next,. . . before clicking "Add the file" ?

When you click "Open", the file name will disappear from the box, but clicking, "Add the file" as the next step and it will still upload that picture file you chose, that appeared in the box.

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sixkids On: Wed Feb 12, 2014 12:42 pm

Jpeg, If I just double click on the picture, or 'open', it puts the 'name of the picture' into the blank spot. When clicking on 'add the file' , or 'submit', the 'name' of the picture goes away. Nothing changes in the text box above, (where I am typing now), and nothing shows up in the 'review', and nothing is posted on the forum, (at least from what I can tell!)
Sixkids
 

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Wed Feb 12, 2014 12:58 pm

Sixkids wrote:Jpeg, If I just double click on the picture, or 'open', it puts the 'name of the picture' into the blank spot. When clicking on 'add the file' , or 'submit', the 'name' of the picture goes away. Nothing changes in the text box above, (where I am typing now), and nothing shows up in the 'review', and nothing is posted on the forum, (at least from what I can tell!)


Carole

Yes the name goes away at a certain point, but that's OK.

Try, these three steps.
1. Click the picture
2. Click "Open",
3. Click "Add the file"

Then, if your on a dial-up connection, see what happens if you give it a couple of minutes before pressing "submit" button.

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: SWPaDon On: Wed Feb 12, 2014 1:01 pm

Sixkids wrote:Jpeg, If I just double click on the picture, or 'open', it puts the 'name of the picture' into the blank spot. When clicking on 'add the file' , or 'submit', the 'name' of the picture goes away. Nothing changes in the text box above, (where I am typing now), and nothing shows up in the 'review', and nothing is posted on the forum, (at least from what I can tell!)

I think you are skipping a step. Or it's not uploading fast enough as Sunny Boy suggested.

Double click the picture, or click 'open'.

click 'add file'.

screen will flash, then scroll down a hair. You should see your file name in blue letters just above 'place inline' button and 'delete file' button.

Click 'submit' after you see that.
SWPaDon
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1600M
Coal Size/Type: Bituminous. Labeled as 'Big Vein', about the size of acorns. Makes a lot of ash, but heats well and lasts longer than my previous coal.

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Wed Feb 12, 2014 9:43 pm

Sixkids wrote:Trying to post a picture of our new stove, but when I clink the picture I want and then click 'add the file' the wordage next to browse, (telling the 'name' of my picture), goes away and nothing happens. :(

I think you have to go one step further, either click on preview or submit at that point. Once you tell it to add the file, it uploads it to the site but you have to click on submit before it goes online....oops, I see I responded before I finished reading the rest of the thread.

Randy
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, & Kineo #15 base heater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: SWPaDon On: Fri Feb 14, 2014 8:11 am

Any updates from Carole?
SWPaDon
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1600M
Coal Size/Type: Bituminous. Labeled as 'Big Vein', about the size of acorns. Makes a lot of ash, but heats well and lasts longer than my previous coal.

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Fri Feb 14, 2014 8:46 am

Don,

Last I heard yesterday was that they have the stove in the cabin, it's all assembled, and they are working on getting it hooked up.

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sixkids On: Fri Feb 14, 2014 9:23 am

UPDATE from Carole and Roger ....We bought 2 pieces of black stove pipe yesterday , (3 actually, but one might go back to TSC). We stopped at TSC and bought a 2 ft piece of black stove pipe, (and an ash bucket with a lid, and a can of high-temp black stove paint). Then we went to a stove place in Erie and bought a 2 piece slidder pipe kit. This is to allow you to remove the pipe from the stove end, by sliding one pipe up into another for easier removal, to enable you to clean out the stove pipe, from the floor of your house. If we are using that we won't be needing to use the 2 ft piece from TSC, (and an additional 3 ft piece of stove pipe that they didn't have). We bought the stove paint in anticipation of making a heat shield for the back of our stove and spray painting it to match the stove.
And now we are stuck .. again ... A big one this time .... We have 2 choices, (at the moment), and can't move forward until we figure this one out. Chimneys. We can choose to go with a stove pipe chimney from the kitchen up through the catwalk, upstairs on up to the roof and out, (about 21 feet to a barnstyle roof), using all stove pipe and needing to have a chimney sweep clean the stove pipe as we are 62 and not looking forward to climbing on a steep metal roof each time to clean it out, (in addition to cleaning out the chimney ourselves from the stove end). OR, .... knowing that the brick chimney is better in the long run, going up from the stove to the 2nd floor through the catwalk floor, (full log wall downstairs), then up past 6 ft tall windows upstairs, to where the log siding wall is and out to join into a brick chimney then up along the side of the house where we could use a ladder on the upper deck to do the clean-out ourselves from a tall step ladder... although in talking to the block layer we would need to wait until warmer weather to build the chimney, ....
.... OR to do option #1 with a combination of #2 added in ... to where we go outside over the upstairs windows .. then straight up with stainless steel chimney until warmer weather then build the chimney and scrap the stainless steel chimney in favor of the block chimney. (Extra expense but able to use the stove faster)....(Possibly resell the stove pipe to recoup some expense?)
Anyone have any other ideas to throw into the mix, or any thoughts on the subject?
We are also looking at stove boards, hearth boards, other thoughts on floor coverage. Our floor is plywood as we haven't added any flooring on top of that as of yet. How important is R value? Some of the stove boards are zero R value. Do we need to cover all the area undeneath and out in front of the stove and behind it too? Also how far out past the ash bin door? If we didn't build into the floor we could simply raise the whatever when we would finish the floor underneath. But, if we built a raised what's-it, it could elevate the stove to avoid stubbing your toe, (how far would be needed?), and a bit easier for coal / wood tending and cooking.
Thoughts are welcomed! :)
Sixkids
 

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Fri Feb 14, 2014 9:43 am

Sunny Boy wrote:The 1927 manual probably wouldn't be up to modern standards anyway. :D

Think of it like a wood stove that can burn coal (yours can be both). There's a ton of set-up info on the internet and just about every wood stove maker has on their websites, for wood stoves. Here's a link that can get you started.

http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.ph ... _woodstove

My range is near the back door and also in a walkway to the pantry. To get it closer to the wall and not out where we need to walk I went with the, "reduce the clearance by using a heat shield" method. However, I hate the look of a big piece of sheet metal attached to the wall behind an antique stove, . . in an antique -ish house.

I made a heat shield for the back of the stove, which is allowable under most fire codes. It's hardly noticeable and has the added benefit of helping to keep heat in the oven. Some 22 gauge, mild, cold rolled sheet metal, a pair of tin snips, a hand drill and within an hour I had a heat shield box that is sandwiched under and hangs from the screws that hold the back splash on. The shield covers the back of the firebox and the oven and flues. That allowed me to get the stove within 14 inches of the wall ("combustible material").

For the hearth, I rarely see anyone putting anything under the firebox end of their range, just floor protectors of some type under the cast iron feet, but I doubt that meets code. I was concerned that if the floor of the ash drawer ever cracked (they are thin) hot coals could drop through onto the floor.

I put 1/2 inch slates on a bed of sand right on the floor. As luck would have it, my kitchen has two linoleum floors put on over the years. Cutting down through the layers of linoleum and backer sheets of masonite, I came to the original hard-rock maple floors. That let me recess the sand and slate on top of the original floor so they are level with the top layer of linoleum and we don't trip over a raised edge.

You can get thinner hearth board at stove shops and home Depot, Lowes, etc., to put under the firebox end of the range. Less chance to trip over it.

There'll be others along to help with chimney choices. One is Berlin, he does chimney work for a living.

Meantime, here's a few pix of the heat shield I bent up for the back of the range.


If you have an extra piece of sheet metal laying around you can use, then Paul's idea is the way to go. Not to try to compete with what Paul showed you, I just wanted to show you what I did in the house with my parlor stove. The tiles were getting too hot for my taste so I went to Lowe's and bought two of the fireproof boards covered with metal that were meant to be used for under & behind wood stoves. I bought 4 L brackets for each board, and some high temp paint (It comes in tons of colors). Since my stove is in a corner, I needed two of them. (I think the boards were $50.00 each). I bolted the L brackets to the bottom of the boards after I painted them...they were originally black. They are portable, can be moved closer or further away...whatever you want. I will attach photos showing what I mean. Paul's way certainly would be more economical and probably less noticeable but wanted to post another option. Another note, I am not sure with these being portable if it would meet code, but I don't see why not???????

Randy
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Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, & Kineo #15 base heater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Fri Feb 14, 2014 10:17 am

Good alternative Randy, especially if it can be color matched to the back ground.

A single sheet of mild steel with an air gap between it and the heat source will meet code for reducing the clearance, but only to a point. I've heard that some of the modern stove manufacturers "reduced clearance kits", that get attached to the stove, can get the stove-to-combustible distance down to as little as eight inches. Does anyone know what materials are used to do that with ?

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sixkids On: Fri Feb 14, 2014 10:50 am

I liked the alternative as well. Good job! That would work really well painted the same color as the walls around it and I think I might be tempted to use that idea if our house were a little more modern. :)
Sixkids
 

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Fri Feb 14, 2014 11:20 am

Sixkids wrote:I liked the alternative as well. Good job! That would work really well painted the same color as the walls around it and I think I might be tempted to use that idea if our house were a little more modern. :)


Taking Randy's idea a bit more toward log-looks. Do you know any tinsmiths ? One with a wide roller that could roll waves into a piece of sheet steel that closely matches the surface shape of the logs ? Painted to match the logs and mounted on spacers I would think it would meet code and it would be an interesting looking heat shield - in a sorta camouflaged way. Since your in the "unregulated stove category", that plus the heat shield on the back of the stove may get you down below the 185 degree wall temp guide line so you could move the stove even closer ?????

BTW, my stove beats that 185 degree rule with just the shield I showed you. And, the stove top back edge is only 14 inches from the wall.

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Visit Hitzer Stoves