Cookin' with coal

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Wed Apr 16, 2014 3:43 am

wilsons woodstoves wrote:I love chicken and rice .did you have to take the lid off the pan to brown It? I noticed your sunny does not have the square clean out in the bottom of the oven. I have a #2 sunny brick in the mould under my sunny, when It dries enough I will bake It for a while, then ship them out to you. Baking brick gives new meaning to cooking with coal . Have a nice easter. Wilson



That brick probably tastes better than what I bake too ! :D

The chicken was baked with the lid on the roasting pan the entire time. I'll ash her how long she baked it for. And, I think she uses chicken stock in the white rice instead of just water ? I'll ask her.

With the stove/nut coal mix, and the water reservoir damper closed, the oven gets hot enough to brown it while covered. Don't forget that one of the hottest surfaces in the oven is the top.

I haven't tried baking with straight stove coal yet, so I don't know how hot the oven will go. Bill, at Once Upon A Time stove shop, told me his Glenwood's oven easily gets up to 600, but I didn't think to ask for more details of what he does to get it that hot. Running on just hard wood maybe ?

Thanks, and a good Easter to you too.

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Wed Apr 16, 2014 1:35 pm

Ok, the cook gave up her secret recipe for chicken in rice.

She doesn't use chicken stock as I thought. Just plain tap water. Same amount of water you use per cup of rice , normally.

She uses a saffron rice seasoning mix sold by a local super market as their brand. There's a long list of other spices and herbs mixed in with the saffron.

She also adds a few pads of butter to the rice.

Last, she sprinkles McCormick Montreal Chicken Spice all over the top of the chicken and rice.

Then cover and into the oven until the chicken browns on top (I think it was about an hour and a half at 400?). Without the cover, too much of the water boils off. Then the rice doesn't cook and the chicken gets too dry (like when I cook :oops: ).

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Wed Apr 16, 2014 3:27 pm

Sunny Boy wrote:Ok, the cook gave up her secret recipe for chicken in rice.

She doesn't use chicken stock as I thought. Just plain tap water. Same amount of water you use per cup of rice , normally.

She uses a saffron rice seasoning mix sold by a local super market as their brand. There's a long list of other spices and herbs mixed in with the saffron.

She also adds a few pads of butter to the rice.

Last, she sprinkles McCormick Montreal Chicken Spice all over the top of the chicken and rice.

Then cover and into the oven until the chicken browns on top (I think it was about an hour and a half at 400?). Without the cover, too much of the water boils off. Then the rice doesn't cook and the chicken gets too dry (like when I cook :oops: ).

Paul


Does she cook the rice first and then add the chicken on top or does she add the chicken right into the rice and water? Sounds like just put everything together and bake it...nice easy recipe!
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Visit Hitzer Stoves

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Wed Apr 16, 2014 3:52 pm

Paul asked me to post this recipe for peasant bread that I made today. I have to come clean right up front, it was cooked with wood, not coal :oops:

3 cups unbleached AP flour
1 1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon yeast
1 1/2 cup warm water

Mix the dry ingredients together, then mix in the water. It is going to be really sticky, but only mix until combined. Cover and let stand on counter for 12 to 24 hours, the longer it sits, the more like sourdough it tastes. Preheat oven to 500° along with a small pot with a lid. Clay pots and cast iron pots work well with this but it has to have a lid. I use my cast iron dutch oven. Put dough on floured board, it is really sticky so I add a little flour on the dough and fold over on itself a few times and form into a ball. Put dough into heated pot and put in the oven for 30 minutes with lid on. (I turn my pot halfway through to bake evenly). Then take the lid off and bake for another 15 min. Take out and cool.

I used white whole wheat flour this time because I was out of AP flour. It turned out just fine, just a little denser and stronger flavor.

This recipe is so simple to make and it takes hardly any time to prepare and no kneading. As you can see in the photo I had already cut into it when Paul asked me to do a post on it...it was good.

Randy
Attachments
IMG_0298[1].jpg
(260.28 KiB) Viewed 3 times
View: New PagePopup • Select:BBCode
[nepathumb]50917[/nepathumb]
IMG_0299[1].jpg
(290.61 KiB) Viewed 3 times
View: New PagePopup • Select:BBCode
[nepathumb]50918[/nepathumb]
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Wed Apr 16, 2014 4:15 pm

Randy,
Yup, no precooking anything for this version of chicken in rice.

What you saw was one package of chicken quarters.

I haven't asked her for the specific recipe. However, from watching most of what she does while I'm doing other stuff around the kitchen, my guess is that the prep time is less than 10 minutes.

If I have this right, . . wash the quarters. Cut the legs from the thighs. Place cut chicken pieces spaced out in roasting pan. Pour rice around the pieces. Add the water. Add the butter. Sprinkle the seasonings over top. Put it in the oven.

I'll double check all that with her when she gets home from work. And, I'll ask if there is a certain amount of cups of rice she uses, or does she just pour in enough rice to fill in between the chicken ? Plus, exactly how long to bake it.

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Wed Apr 16, 2014 4:19 pm

Randy,
The bread looks wonderful. Thank you.

Not sure I can get my range's oven up to 500 on coal. Would it work at a little over 400 ?

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Wed Apr 16, 2014 4:26 pm

Sunny Boy wrote:Randy,
The bread looks wonderful. Thank you.

Not sure I can get my range's oven up to 500 on coal. Would it work at a little over 400 ?

Paul

Yes it will work Paul, when I baked the bread today, it was at 400° for part of it and 450° for most of it. The original recipe called for 500°.
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Wed Apr 16, 2014 5:21 pm

Thanks Randy,

OK, I'll see if I can give it a try while the cold weather is still here.

Paul.
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Wed Apr 16, 2014 9:03 pm

The cook got home and gave me corrections on the chicken in rice. It's simple, and yes, it takes about 10 minutes to prep.

1. Start pre-heat oven to 400 degrees.
2. Take a stick of butter and using it like a crayon, coat the bottom of the roasting pan.
3. Pour in about 2-1/2 to 3 cups of rice to cover the bottom of the pan.
4. Pour in twice as many cups of water as rice used, plus an extra half cup of water to prevent the rice drying out during long baking.
5. Sprinkle seasoning and herbs over rice.
6. Season chicken with salt and pepper, or whatever you prefer. We use the McCormack Montreal Chicken seasoning too.
7. Place washed pieces of cut-up chicken quarters gently on top of the rice.
8. Put cover on roasting pan, and place pan in oven.
9. Bake for 2 hours.

Enjoy.

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Thu Apr 17, 2014 4:37 pm

Sunny Boy wrote:The cook got home and gave me corrections on the chicken in rice. It's simple, and yes, it takes about 10 minutes to prep.

1. Start pre-heat oven to 400 degrees.
2. Take a stick of butter and using it like a crayon, coat the bottom of the roasting pan.
3. Pour in about 2-1/2 to 3 cups of rice to cover the bottom of the pan.
4. Pour in twice as many cups of water as rice used, plus an extra half cup of water to prevent the rice drying out during long baking.
5. Sprinkle seasoning and herbs over rice.
6. Season chicken with salt and pepper, or whatever you prefer. We use the McCormack Montreal Chicken seasoning too.
7. Place washed pieces of cut-up chicken quarters gently on top of the rice.
8. Put cover on roasting pan, and place pan in oven.
9. Bake for 2 hours.

Enjoy.

Paul


Please tell Melisa that I tried this recipe and really liked it. After I put it all together, I put it on top of the stove for a few minutes and brought it to a boil then put it in the oven and it was done in just over an hour. I even used brown rice which takes even longer to cook. This is going to be a regular for me now!

Randy
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Thu Apr 17, 2014 4:54 pm

Thanks, Randy - I'll pass that on to her.

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Fri Apr 18, 2014 5:56 am

Well, with the cold weather coming to an end (?) we got in a bunch of baking. Figured why not? Still have over a ton of nut coal left in the bin, . . and it's cheaper then using $4.00 + a gallon pro-pain to run the gas stove oven. :shock:

While I was (not-so-patiently :D ) waiting for Randy's peasant bread dough to be ready to bake, I started getting the stove ready. I broke into a bag of Blaschak stove coal. Mixed the bigger pieces 50/50 with nut coal to give higher oven temps.

Having seen me mix the dough before she left for work, as soon as the Fiancée got home from work she wanted to get in on the baking fun too.

While I was waiting to get the bread baking, having read about my impatients, :oops: Michaelanthony took pity on me and pm-d me a recipe for scones that can be done in about 20 minutes. Would have tried it right then but the kitchen was already taken over. I was told to stay out of the kitchen, or I'd spoil the surprise !

Turns out, she baked a couple of batches of ginger snap cookies. Pix below.

When she finished, it was close to the 12 hours wait being up. So, I finished prepping the dough and into the oven it went.

The 50/50 stove nut mix coal did it's work. As you can see in the pix it turned out great !!!! What my father would call, "A good dunking bread". Tough crust, but soft inside with plenty of big pockets to hold, butter, spaghetti sauce, gravy, stew, or whatever. The Fiancée hardly wanted to eat the dinner she prepared, just the bread ! :D

Thanks Randy. Hope your B'day turned out as good for you as it did for us !

And Michaelanthony, thanks goes to you too. I'm gonna try that scone recipe this afternoon and report back here.

Paul
Attachments
DSCN4030.JPG
(207.8 KiB) Viewed 5 times
View: New PagePopup • Select:BBCode
[nepathumb]50937[/nepathumb]
DSCN4035.JPG
(203.84 KiB) Viewed 7 times
View: New PagePopup • Select:BBCode
[nepathumb]50938[/nepathumb]
DSCN4037.JPG
(214.21 KiB) Viewed 8 times
View: New PagePopup • Select:BBCode
[nepathumb]50939[/nepathumb]
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Fri Apr 18, 2014 7:10 am

Sunny Boy wrote:Well, with the cold weather coming to an end (?) we got in a bunch of baking. Figured why not? Still have over a ton of nut coal left in the bin, . . and it's cheaper then using $4.00 + a gallon pro-pain to run the gas stove oven. :shock:

While I was (not-so-patiently :D ) waiting for Randy's peasant bread dough to be ready to bake, I started getting the stove ready. I broke into a bag of Blaschak stove coal. Mixed the bigger pieces 50/50 with nut coal to give higher oven temps.

Having seen me mix the dough before she left for work, as soon as the Fiancée got home from work she wanted to get in on the baking fun too.

While I was waiting to get the bread baking, having read about my impatients, :oops: Michaelanthony took pity on me and pm-d me a recipe for scones that can be done in about 20 minutes. Would have tried it right then but the kitchen was already taken over. I was told to stay out of the kitchen, or I'd spoil the surprise !

Turns out, she baked a couple of batches of ginger snap cookies. Pix below.

When she finished, it was close to the 12 hours wait being up. So, I finished prepping the dough and into the oven it went.

The 50/50 stove nut mix coal did it's work. As you can see in the pix it turned out great !!!! What my father would call, "A good dunking bread". Tough crust, but soft inside with plenty of big pockets to hold, butter, spaghetti sauce, gravy, stew, or whatever. The Fiancée hardly wanted to eat the dinner she prepared, just the bread ! :D

Thanks Randy. Hope your B'day turned out as good for you as it did for us !

And Michaelanthony, thanks goes to you too. I'm gonna try that scone recipe this afternoon and report back here.

Paul


Looks good Paul! I love the tough crust of this bread and it is one of my favorites. Man, those cookies look good!

Randy
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Fri Apr 18, 2014 7:22 am

The cookies turned out great too.

Not too dried out and hard, or too ginger-y like the store-bought ones, which tend to give me heart burn. These are more like a cross between sugar cookies and ginger snaps !

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Sat Apr 19, 2014 10:01 am

Yup, as I said, that peasant bread is a good "dunking bread". Made spaghetti last night and the second half of that loaf of bread was prefect for soaking up the sauce. Thank you again Randy !!!!

Michaelanthony, I didn't get to try out that scones recipe yet because the "Kitchen Komander" :D was having fun baking more types of cookies. Sometimes I wonder if she bought that range for me, as she says, . . or was that just an excuse to get me to set up the range for her ? :D

Who'd a thought there'd be a waiting line to use a 111 year old coal range ? :roll:

Anyway, I'm gonna see if she will let me reserve some oven time today.

Paul
Attachments
DSCN4042.JPG
(208.85 KiB) Viewed 10 times
View: New PagePopup • Select:BBCode
[nepathumb]50950[/nepathumb]
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Visit Hitzer Stoves