Cookin' with coal

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Tue Nov 26, 2013 10:07 pm

Sunny Boy wrote:BTW, for anyone interested in cooking on an old range, there's a pretty good book about it. Lots of info on kitchen range manufacturers, what to look for before buying, how to hook one up and operate it with either wood or coal. With over 100 pages of recipes, plus many more pages of other uses for wood/coal ranges. 196 pages in all, with drawings.

The title is, WOODSTOVE COOKERY, AT HOME ON THE RANGE. by Jane Cooper. I see Amazon.com still offers it for sale for under $10.00 in paper back.

Printed in 1977 by Storey Publishing, it's geared more toward the novice with the info it provides about how to check out, hook up and operate old cooking ranges. And, even more of the range manufactures listed in it are out of business, but all the other info is still very valuable.

And, giving the wife a copy may help lean her more toward letting you get an old range. :D

Hope you enjoy.

Paul

Paul, you are right about the book "Woodstove Cookery, At Home On The Range" is a very good book. Another one I ordered from Lehman's was a cookbook that Home Comfort ranges use to hand out to people who purchased their ranges. I like this book even better than the other one because of the historical value of it. Lehman's had it re-printed directly from the original. Some of the recipes are hard to follow, example: for starting out to make bread, it says start with a "good amount of flour". LOL How much is a good amount? LOL The back of the book is full of information pertinent to running a farm/household.

I got back tonight from driving to Lehman's in Ohio. The store is awesome and overwhelming to the senses, if you like this sort of thing. (I certainly do) The snow storm that hit Western NY today around 1:30 made a mess of things and I got home an hour and half later than I planned but made it safely. Overall, I am glad I got to see the store and was a good trip.
Randy
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Tue Nov 26, 2013 11:09 pm

A "goodly amount of flour". Wow, that must have made for some interesting cakes ! :D

Some of those old recipes need a translator. When I bought this house there was a crate of old books from the 1800's. In there was a thick cook book. Lots of info, but many of the terms and methods of measure are different than what's used in cook books today. And some of the names of the recipes are less than appetizing too. :D

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 6:26 pm

I got the coal fire going in the cook stove today and it will be going right through tomorrow. I made two mincemeat pies today...the old fashioned way, with meat in it. They turned out nice...well, they look nice anyway. Will have to wait until tomorrow to test them.

I really like baking with the coal fire going as opposed to wood. With coal, you get the temperature regulated and it will stay right there through the whole process. With wood, you have to throw more wood on the fire and that changes the temps.
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

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Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: windyhill4.2 On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 6:56 pm

Photog200 -- Do you have to regulate the oven temp.by regulating the fire temp.? Should have a draft Knob or 2 on the oven door to help regulate inside oven temp. Thanks. David
windyhill4.2
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1960 EFM520 installed in truck box
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404 with variable blower
Coal Size/Type: 404-nut, 520 rice ,anthracite for both

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 7:08 pm

windyhill4.2 wrote:Photog200 -- Do you have to regulate the oven temp.by regulating the fire temp.? Should have a draft Knob or 2 on the oven door to help regulate inside oven temp. Thanks. David

If you have to make a big change in the temp, then I change the fire draft. It it is not too much of a change, you can just open the check damper a little and it will cool it down.
Randy
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 7:16 pm

Photog200 wrote:
windyhill4.2 wrote:Photog200 -- Do you have to regulate the oven temp.by regulating the fire temp.? Should have a draft Knob or 2 on the oven door to help regulate inside oven temp. Thanks. David

If you have to make a big change in the temp, then I change the fire draft. It it is not too much of a change, you can just open the check damper a little and it will cool it down.
Randy

I have also been known to just crack the door open to cool it down a bit in the oven. I would agree that a control to let some heat out would be nice.
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: windyhill4.2 On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 8:10 pm

Photog200 wrote:
windyhill4.2 wrote:Photog200 -- Do you have to regulate the oven temp.by regulating the fire temp.? Should have a draft Knob or 2 on the oven door to help regulate inside oven temp. Thanks. David

If you have to make a big change in the temp, then I change the fire draft. It it is not too much of a change, you can just open the check damper a little and it will cool it down.
Randy

Opening the check damper ( the one you thought check meant open this plate to check,yep i read this thread from the beginning ) smile here as i have no idea how to put smiley faces in. Opening that damper will let heat go up the stack ? instead of thru the flues around the oven ? We are trying to learn as much as we can about cooking with coal so when we do get a stove we are better prepared.Thanks for info.David
windyhill4.2
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1960 EFM520 installed in truck box
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404 with variable blower
Coal Size/Type: 404-nut, 520 rice ,anthracite for both

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 8:25 pm

windyhill4.2 wrote:
Photog200 wrote:
windyhill4.2 wrote:Photog200 -- Do you have to regulate the oven temp.by regulating the fire temp.? Should have a draft Knob or 2 on the oven door to help regulate inside oven temp. Thanks. David

If you have to make a big change in the temp, then I change the fire draft. It it is not too much of a change, you can just open the check damper a little and it will cool it down.
Randy

Opening the check damper ( the one you thought check meant open this plate to check,yep i read this thread from the beginning ) smile here as i have no idea how to put smiley faces in. Opening that damper will let heat go up the stack ? instead of thru the flues around the oven ? We are trying to learn as much as we can about cooking with coal so when we do get a stove we are better prepared.Thanks for info.David

LOL, well, that was Paul that said that...but yes that one. LOL You can see it in one of his photos, it is right on top of the stove near the stove pipe. When opened, it sucks air through there and short circuiting it from going up through the coals...cooling the fire. Depending how far you open that damper will depend on how much it cools. It is however important to note that the check damper should not be left open at night. If you get negative draft, it can put CO into your house. Only use it when you are right there.
Randy
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 8:35 pm

windyhill4.2 wrote:
Photog200 wrote:
windyhill4.2 wrote:Photog200 -- Do you have to regulate the oven temp.by regulating the fire temp.? Should have a draft Knob or 2 on the oven door to help regulate inside oven temp. Thanks. David

If you have to make a big change in the temp, then I change the fire draft. It it is not too much of a change, you can just open the check damper a little and it will cool it down.
Randy

Opening the check damper ( the one you thought check meant open this plate to check,yep i read this thread from the beginning ) smile here as i have no idea how to put smiley faces in. Opening that damper will let heat go up the stack ? instead of thru the flues around the oven ? We are trying to learn as much as we can about cooking with coal so when we do get a stove we are better prepared.Thanks for info. David



Windy,
The Oh, duh, about the check damper would be me. :roll: Randy's too smart to get that one mixed up. :D

Check damper vs oven damper. On my stove in the pictures, they are right next to each other.

The "check damper" doesn't let heat go up the stack. It lets colder room air into the base of the stack to cool off flue gases, thus slowing, or "checking" the draft, which in turn slows down the fire.

The "oven damper" is the one that, when opened, sends the fire box heat directly to the stack instead of through the oven flues.

You were close - just inches apart ! :D

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: windyhill4.2 On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 8:50 pm

Sorry Paul ,i gave the credit to the wrong guy, insert my embarrassed face here,sorry Randy for the false accusation, and me being a new member !? Anyway.. thank you both for the info,do all makes of cook stoves have both dampers ? i don't recall seeing 2 on the Columbia i looked at last week .thanks again David
windyhill4.2
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1960 EFM520 installed in truck box
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404 with variable blower
Coal Size/Type: 404-nut, 520 rice ,anthracite for both

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 9:01 pm

windyhill4.2 wrote:Sorry Paul ,i gave the credit to the wrong guy, insert my embarrassed face here,sorry Randy for the false accusation, and me being a new member !? Anyway.. thank you both for the info,do all makes of cook stoves have both dampers ? i don't recall seeing 2 on the Columbia i looked at last week .thanks again David

I believe most stoves would have the check damper but they might not be in the same location. It is a standard way of controlling fires especially if it is windy out and a strong draft. (like tonight). I would also bet that all stoves would have some kind of oven control. During the summer months, people would want to have just a small fire and then let it go out after cooking. If the oven was always engaged it would be unmercifully hot. The stoves smoke a lot when starting a fire, if you forget to disengage the oven control. So, in conclusion...I would have to say that any good cook stove would have both controls on it.

No problem with getting our conversations confused...if I had not already figured out the check damper on my stove in the living room, I would have made the same mistake! After you learn what the controls are for, it is easy to know when to implement them.
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: windyhill4.2 On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 9:16 pm

Photog200 wrote:
windyhill4.2 wrote:Sorry Paul ,i gave the credit to the wrong guy, insert my embarrassed face here,sorry Randy for the false accusation, and me being a new member !? Anyway.. thank you both for the info,do all makes of cook stoves have both dampers ? i don't recall seeing 2 on the Columbia i looked at last week .thanks again David

I believe most stoves would have the check damper but they might not be in the same location. It is a standard way of controlling fires especially if it is windy out and a strong draft. (like tonight). I would also bet that all stoves would have some kind of oven control. During the summer months, people would want to have just a small fire and then let it go out after cooking. If the oven was always engaged it would be unmercifully hot. The stoves smoke a lot when starting a fire, if you forget to disengage the oven control. So, in conclusion...I would have to say that any good cook stove would have both controls on it.

No problem with getting our conversations confused...if I had not already figured out the check damper on my stove in the living room, I would have made the same mistake! After you learn what the controls are for, it is easy to know when to implement them.

So the key word is good stove , BUT is the Columbia made by Keeley, in Columbia ,Pa. a good stove or a cheap stove, how is the Dickson stove? i don't know how to post pictures & images,but Craigs list,Harrisburg,Pa. lists the Dickson & Columbia stoves which have flat sides like a cabinet,from the front do not look as much like stoves as you 2 guys have.
windyhill4.2
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1960 EFM520 installed in truck box
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404 with variable blower
Coal Size/Type: 404-nut, 520 rice ,anthracite for both

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Photog200 On: Wed Nov 27, 2013 9:33 pm

windyhill4.2 wrote:
Photog200 wrote:
windyhill4.2 wrote:Sorry Paul ,i gave the credit to the wrong guy, insert my embarrassed face here,sorry Randy for the false accusation, and me being a new member !? Anyway.. thank you both for the info,do all makes of cook stoves have both dampers ? i don't recall seeing 2 on the Columbia i looked at last week .thanks again David

I believe most stoves would have the check damper but they might not be in the same location. It is a standard way of controlling fires especially if it is windy out and a strong draft. (like tonight). I would also bet that all stoves would have some kind of oven control. During the summer months, people would want to have just a small fire and then let it go out after cooking. If the oven was always engaged it would be unmercifully hot. The stoves smoke a lot when starting a fire, if you forget to disengage the oven control. So, in conclusion...I would have to say that any good cook stove would have both controls on it.

No problem with getting our conversations confused...if I had not already figured out the check damper on my stove in the living room, I would have made the same mistake! After you learn what the controls are for, it is easy to know when to implement them.

So the key word is good stove , BUT is the Columbia made by Keeley, in Columbia ,Pa. a good stove or a cheap stove, how is the Dickson stove? i don't know how to post pictures & images,but Craigs list,Harrisburg,Pa. lists the Dickson & Columbia stoves which have flat sides like a cabinet,from the front do not look as much like stoves as you 2 guys have.

To be completely honest with you, I have not done any research on those cabinet style stoves. Coming from PA, the anthracite coal capital, my guess they would have known how to build a nice stove. But that is just a guess on my part. The main things you want to look for when looking at a stove is what condition the grates are in and the condition the stove top/eyes are in. When burning coal, it is important to keep everything as air tight as possible so the air has to come up through the grates. If the tops are warped, you could get air leakage. If the grates are wrecked, it could be hard to get replacement parts (depending on the brand of stove). You would also want to see what condition the fire box is in, is it rusted, is it lined???

Hope this helps.
Randy
Photog200
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Colonial Clarion cook stove, Kineo #15 base burner & Geneva Oak Andes #517
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Chestnut
Other Heating: Electric Baseboard

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Smokeyja On: Thu Nov 28, 2013 10:27 am

Sunny , great thread you started here! Also check out KITCHEN RANGES

That is a thread Mike started last year .

I was sad to sell my cook stove as it was a coal/wood cook stove with triangular grates. The Zephyr deluxe it was called but it was too modern looking for me . It had a water hook up for thermal convection already as well!

When I do get a cool stove I will be creating a system of thermal convection as Mile "coalturkey" was talking about .

Here is the thread with a of photos on that zephyr if you're ever interested .

My wife is going to kill me! Zephyr Cook Stove

I am trying to find a stove smaller more like your sunny.

I may build one myself this go around. Between the stoves I've used and the reading and learning I've done on this site I think I could build one that would work rather well.
Smokeyja
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Anthracite Nut

Re: Cookin' with coal

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Thu Nov 28, 2013 2:32 pm

Thanks.

For what it's worth to your search, . . .
As I mentioned, my 1903 Glenwood Sunny Mod 208, is at the smaller end of kitchen range sizes. There are many choices of rangers even smaller, however, they may be trading off fire box capacity, or oven size, or heat output because of shorter internal flues to extract heat.

You've seen the pictures, here's the size specs.

My Sunny , with the optional water tank, is 53 inches wide - measured plumb from the ash door ledge to water tank top rail. Without the water tank and no right end shelf, the stove would be 43 inches wide.

Front to rear, it's 30 inches from plumb with the rear top edge to the oven door ledge. Add five inches to that to swing the trivets back so large pots can be put on the very back of the stove top.

The cook top is 31 inches high, with approx. 24 x 32 inch worth of heated cooking area. Hottest on the left end over the firebox.

The oven is, approx. 18 inches wide, 10 inches high, and 19 inches deep. With only one slide-out "pie shelf" about midway up. While not quite as large as most modern ovens, we've had no problems cooking a 20 lb turkey in a large roasting pan. Or , fitting two medium sized Corning Wear casseroles in it at the same time.

The warming shelf is 47 inches high.

The firebox has the original, molded refractory liners making it approx. 15 x 6 x 6 inches (excluding the years of built up coal ash scale). It can run on wood, and load the wood through the front door by sliding the front refractory section and the iron backing plate up and out.

For long term wood use, they did sell iron firebox liners that give a bit more wood room. And wood grates were available. However, the firebox is still small compared to only a few years later production Glenwood Sunny, or others of the same general size such as the very commonly seen Model C.

Beware! The stoves should NOT be used without firebox liners. I've seen pictures of few Glenwood stoves for sale that had no liners (iron, or refractory), and they had the resulting cracked firebox/oven walls.

The first year I had the stove I went through about a face cord of maple and red oak in the Fall. Even with the front loading door liners out, the wood has to be cut shorter than usual face cord lengths. Since I don't cut firewood I had to have it cut to order, . . which didn't get me any bargain on wood price. Plus, having to restart it every morning, or if I went away for more than five of six hours, and feeding more wood every two hours or so, got old really quick !!!

Even with the smaller fire box, filled with fresh coal and damped down for the night, it will hold a fire 10-11 hours. And, when I come down in the morning, it will keep my 11 x 20 foot old kitchen (that has two uninsulated outside walls, tall ceiling, three doors to other parts of the house, several old tall windows, and an open air register to an upstairs bed room), at 65 degrees, when it's been near zero outside over night.

Hope this helps your search.

And congrats to you both on the pending kid !

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Visit Hitzer Stoves