Stove Fireplace Installation

Stove Fireplace Installation

PostBy: Alfred On: Thu Dec 05, 2013 8:51 pm

I'm looking for guidance with respect to installing a coal stove at a fireplace opening. I initially thought I would use tile board and ceramic tiles to close in the fireplace opening. Then run a stove pipe through a hole cut out of the tile and tile board. One question I have is how do you support the stove pipe as it passes through the tile/tile board and as it rests inside the fireplace. There will be an elbow inside the fireplace and maybe 3 or more sections of stove pipe running up the chimney. How should all of that be supported so it doesn't rotate and doesn't move when attaching the stove?

Another thought I had which I think I like better, is omitting the tiled board and fastening a piece of tile backer board or sheet metal directly to the old horizontal metal damper housing, then running the stove pipe through a hole cut out in that material. In that case the brick inside the fireplace will remain visible. In either case is there a way to secure the stove pipe before attaching the stove? A flange or thimble of sorts that allows you to secure stove pipe through an opening?

Thanks!
Alfred
 

Re: Stove Fireplace Installation

PostBy: michaelanthony On: Thu Dec 05, 2013 11:19 pm

This set up was quick and painless, I took down the internal damper flapper only and left the other half intact. I had 5 inches of clearance into the clay chimney. I attached a 2 ft. section of black pipe to an elbow to a 1 ft. section. the 2 ft. is in the chimney and about 4 inches of the 1 ft. section protruded through the cement board. Behind the cement board in the fireplace is a column of bricks supporting the 6" black pipe which I needed to squeeze into an oval shape to fit past the damper frame of 5 inches, the pipe ain't goin' anywhere! I am a lunatic when it comes to measuring and I located where the hole needed to be in the cement board and cut a hole 6 and 1/8 approx. in diameter and fit it over the pipe. Tap-con (cement screws) into the cement joint around the board, black high temp fire caulking around perimeter. I used a car scissor jack to slowly move the stove into position and it was like Docking at the space station. Bellisimo!...............I was nervous as fudge :lol:
This will be reworked this spring...my wife promises me! :oops:
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michaelanthony
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vigilant 2310, gold marc box, vogelzang pot belly coat rack
Coal Size/Type: Pea, and a little nut
Other Heating: Very cold FHA oil furnace

Re: Stove Fireplace Installation

PostBy: Alfred On: Fri Dec 06, 2013 12:02 am

michaelanthony wrote:This set up was quick and painless, I took down the internal damper flapper only and left the other half intact. I had 5 inches of clearance into the clay chimney. I attached a 2 ft. section of black pipe to an elbow to a 1 ft. section. the 2 ft. is in the chimney and about 4 inches of the 1 ft. section protruded through the cement board. Behind the cement board in the fireplace is a column of bricks supporting the 6" black pipe which I needed to squeeze into an oval shape to fit past the damper frame of 5 inches, the pipe ain't goin' anywhere! I am a lunatic when it comes to measuring and I located where the hole needed to be in the cement board and cut a hole 6 and 1/8 approx. in diameter and fit it over the pipe. Tap-con (cement screws) into the cement joint around the board, black high temp fire caulking around perimeter. I used a car scissor jack to slowly move the stove into position and it was like Docking at the space station. Bellisimo!...............I was nervous as fudge :lol:
This will be reworked this spring...my wife promises me! :oops:


Very nice Mike! I find it very interesting to see how people do things, and the varied challenges that they face. I was wondering if people propped up the stove pipe, as you did. Instead of bricks I was thinking putting in a stove pipe T instead of the elbow. And then running a straight section with cap, until it met the floor of the fireplace. Actually, the cap could be screwed to the floor before installing the straight section and T. That would make things rigid. I was told by Doug Crane that the feet of the 404 are adjustable about a half inch or more. After removing the damper I had plenty of room for a six inch stove pipe to pass through. I'm still thinking about not using cement board to cover the opening, but instead fastening the cement board to the damper frame, and then cutting a hole in it to pass the stovepipe through.

Thanks!
Alfred
 


Re: Stove Fireplace Installation

PostBy: michaelanthony On: Fri Dec 06, 2013 12:33 am

Yup, as long as it's safe and warm it's good! Don't forget the pic's.
michaelanthony
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vigilant 2310, gold marc box, vogelzang pot belly coat rack
Coal Size/Type: Pea, and a little nut
Other Heating: Very cold FHA oil furnace

Re: Stove Fireplace Installation

PostBy: Lightning On: Fri Dec 06, 2013 5:11 am

Hey Mike, just curious.. Did you stuff insulation around the pipe where it goes up into the chimney so room air can't be pulled up the chimney? Or is the cement board barrier to serve that purpose? Do you have a mano hooked up to it? What kind of readings ya get?
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Stove Size Mix

Re: Stove Fireplace Installation

PostBy: dcrane On: Fri Dec 06, 2013 7:26 am

Great question Al and always a subject for discussion on a fireplace install of a stove! the subject matter is here for you and many people have done this many ways...
On a Crane 404 install to an existing fireplace (which is exactly what the 404 was designed for) you dont really have to use a "T" because of the removable baffle. I will give you one thread I can grab easy because i wrote it that you will like reading Removing a Built in damper from fireplace , but their are lots more im sure you could search for as well using the search box in upper right corner of this page^^^ (type things like Fireplace Blocker, Damper Removal, Fireplace Install, etc.)

I personally like to get the portion of pipe going up the chimney past the smoke shelf area (preferably into the flue or smaller bricked area of the main chimney run), it does not much matter if you blocker board/sheet metal is used in the smoke shelf/damper area OR on the face opening of the fireplace itself (in my case i needed the stove to sit a couple inches inside the fireplace opening to allow my hearth to remain untouched with no extensions or loss of sq' liv area). The comment of using fireproof insulation around the "thru pipe" is smart in either case (my own blocker plate is actually cemented in place as a permanent attachment to the chimney and the 6 inch thru pipe cut was so tight and accurate i did not bother stuffing insulation into a gap that was non-exsistant (I should and could put a bead of furnace cement around the seam... maybe ill get to it someday ;) ) expansion & contraction will make that seam fail every couple years anyways so i just did not bother because i got the pipe to fit so snug.

i have some other threads showing my install im sure someplace in the Crane sections "fireplace reface" maybe? their are also brackets that can be bought or made that hold a pipe centered in a flue as well, but my pipe goes at a slight angle about a foot into the terra cotta liner and is secured by the tight 6 inch hole cut into the cemented rock board and secured to the flu collar on the 404 itself (it wont be touched again unless i replace the black pipe in 10 or 20 years toothy ). Some folks screw the pipe to the stoves flu collar while others take a large super quality hose clamp and secure it that way (your going to find the pipe is SO snug once you get it to slide onto the flu collar that you would mystified how it could EVER move (even with no screws or pipe clamp) :lol:

I use a blower at times on my stove and having the rear of the stoves a few inches into the fireplace opening keeps any noise the blower makes "inside" the firebox and not in my living room. If your blocker plate is on the face of the fireplace your draw comes all the way down inside the firebox of the fireplace (which is more often than not the area you may have loose brick/mortar as well as ash dump, etc.... all places of potential loss of draw/draft into the stove). some advantages of blocking the fireplace opening is that your not heating the firebox area (i think the heated pipe makes up for any of that though) and if your firebox is much larger than the stove you may not want to see inside the fireplace if its unsightly? also one last thing you want to keep in your minds eye while making these decisions is converting back to a conventional fireplace someday upon resale or whatever (i suggest you keep your removed damper plate up inside the smoke shelf! this is the first place folks will look for it long after your gone ;) )

hope this helps give you some good food for thought... we look forward to your photo's and threads as your moving along.... :clap:
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: Stove Fireplace Installation

PostBy: michaelanthony On: Fri Dec 06, 2013 7:49 am

[quote="Lightning"]Hey Mike, just curious.. Did you stuff insulation around the pipe where it goes up into the chimney so room air can't be pulled up the chimney? Or is the cement board barrier to serve that purpose? Do you have a mano hooked up to it? What kind of readings ya get?[/quote]
Two winters ago I had my box stove in the same spot only that stove and hearth pad stuck out 4 ft. this one 2 ft. The Gold Marc stove had a door that had been slightly warped so it leaked no matter what I did but I was able to get -.04 no problem with a baro. This stove is as tight as a...never mind...very tight! I have not put the mano. on her yet but I shall (or the black sedans will show up one day) :lol:
I did not insulate the black pipe that goes up past my smoke shelf, no need the cement board and black fire caulking takes care of any infiltration. Thanks for asking partnah :)
michaelanthony
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vigilant 2310, gold marc box, vogelzang pot belly coat rack
Coal Size/Type: Pea, and a little nut
Other Heating: Very cold FHA oil furnace