Why are maintenance mechanics hard to find for industry?

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Re: Why are maintenance mechanics hard to find for industry?

PostBy: GoodProphets On: Tue Dec 10, 2013 9:29 pm

Hey Ed, that is true.

I will say when I was in my early years of high school, I always dreamed of going to votech.
I took cabinet classes and construction classes in high school.
I just missed the boat with the direction I took.

However, I can say that my wife went, my brother went for cabinetry and my sister went for cosmetology.
My sister has her own shop in her house.
My brother has had steady good paying work since he graduated
and my wife, well she has a full time mother job lol.

The Lancaster county Votech system is still going on, and I still have been
thinking of going back mostly for learning to educate myself.
It is truly a wonderful way to learn a living.
GoodProphets
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Coal Size/Type: Anthra Rice
Other Heating: 3 Fireplaces

Re: Why are maintenance mechanics hard to find for industry?

PostBy: Ed.A On: Tue Dec 10, 2013 9:55 pm

GoodProphets wrote:Hey Ed, that is true.

I will say when I was in my early years of high school, I always dreamed of going to votech.
I took cabinet classes and construction classes in high school.
I just missed the boat with the direction I took.

However, I can say that my wife went, my brother went for cabinetry and my sister went for cosmetology.
My sister has her own shop in her house.
My brother has had steady good paying work since he graduated
and my wife, well she has a full time mother job lol.

The Lancaster county Votech system is still going on, and I still have been
thinking of going back mostly for learning to educate myself.
It is truly a wonderful way to learn a living.


I am more than Happy for you and Yours, nobody in life gives a guarantee.

I will give you this: Merry Christmas, Happy New Years and let Peace Love and good things stay with you.
Ed.A
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska Channing III/ '94 Stoker II
Coal Size/Type: Rice

Re: Why are maintenance mechanics hard to find for industry?

PostBy: SMITTY On: Tue Dec 10, 2013 10:25 pm

Hear hear, Ed!



Mechanics. We're a dying breed. Works for me though, because it means I will NEVER sit idle wondering where money is going to come from.

Seems the Department of Education doesn't want people to be able to "do" for themselves. If they allowed shop class, that means kids might learn to be self-sufficient! :o Oh the humanity! :lol:

Glenn Beck just had Mike Rowe from Dirty Jobs on his show a couple weeks back. Mike has an organization that supports HANDS-ON jobs. He's well versed in the fact that we've been pushing kids to college rather than to trades. He made a point to note he's not anti- college -- just that not everyone is cut out for it. What a Patriot - he gets it 100%. Here's his site - pay attention to that poster there that his guidance counselor showed him when he was in high school: http://profoundlydisconnected.com/

Everyone I know that went to college is no better off than I am. When I was driving truck, I was pulling in more per year. I hated school so much that the thought of another 4 years made me physically ill at 17 when I graduated H/S.

I took 8 years off to party like a rock star ... every day ... nearly 24/7. Found myself looking around at what everyone else had, and started feeling sorry for myself & resentful toward those who had "stuff" (just what the left wants!). Hit a real low point. Had a g/f that I couldn't trust, bills I couldn't pay, and nobody (so I thought) that gave a *censored*. You can only sit in *censored* for so long before you figure a way out - just human nature. I had no place to go but up. I GTFO of dodge, spent a couple years in Phoenix, AZ and got my brain straightened out. Haven't talked to that whore since. Ran out of cash in CA, and that forced me to come back to MA. My best buddy was 26 years old and dying of cancer - his last wish was that his brother set me up with my now wife. What a guy!! His mom owns the salon that my wife works at - he'd been trying to set me up with her since I was 17! I wasn't interested then - too stupid I guess. We've been together ever since, and my life FINALLY got on a normal track. Been together 12 years now, married for 10 next summer.

My whole family worked with their hands - at least the males anyway. My grandfather was one of a few remaining people left in the late 80's early 90's that could work on Model T Fords. He got through life doing anything and everything, from hunting/trapping and selling pelts, to oil burner repair, to auto mechanics, to a machine shop. Built his own house by hand, after the guy at the bank turned his nose up at him. I love the story of that same banker who happened by my grandpa's house as it was nearly completed. The banker pulled over and approached my grandfather .."It appears we've made a mistake! That loan is available anytime you want it Mr. Smith." My grandpa told him where he could stick that loan .... :D

I picked up mechanics as a necessity. If I broke my bicycle, my dad would pay to have it fixed ONCE. After that, it was either fix it myself, or feel dad's wrath. I fixed alot of stuff he never knew about. I taught me to respect & cherish what I have. Used to ride to the local dump to scrounge for parts. Always found something. The EPA fixed the "free" parts thing for us though in the late 80's ... was fun while it lasted ...

Same with cars. Cost so much to get a vehicle on the road in MA, I had no choice but to do all my own maintenance & repairs. Kept me focused on the road too ... because I couldn't do body work (didn't have the tools, nor the money to buy them), I never had an accident with that first truck I bought.

I was different from all my buddies even back then. Most of them had fairly well-off parents that had no problem co-signing loans for expensive toys. Nobody could be bothered to fix their own cars. "I ain't got time for that *censored*" is what I used to hear (and still do). Well, I ain't got the CASH for that *censored* either! So it was fix it myself ... or walk to work.

And the rest is history ...
SMITTY
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Patriot Coal - custom built by Jim Dorsey
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III (not currently in use)
Coal Size/Type: Rice / Blaschak anthracite
Other Heating: Oil fired Burnham boiler


Re: Why are maintenance mechanics hard to find for industry?

PostBy: jpete On: Tue Dec 10, 2013 10:31 pm

As most of you know, I just went back to a "tech school" to get a new career in HVAC.

I had several conversations with a few of the instructors about why the school wasn't more in depth or rigorous. They told me that it's geared toward the kid coming out of high school that barely knows the dangerous end of a screwdriver. It's certainly not set up for 40+ year olds who were recently laid off. Too bad because that accounted for about half my class.....

I don't know if you get to hang around with many 18-20 y.o.'s but some of them are damn scary.

$9/hr might be good for them, but it's not going to cut it for anyone with any skills. I was making that 20 years ago in my first machining job out of college.
jpete
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mk II
Coal Size/Type: Stove, Nut, Pea
Other Heating: Dino juice

Re: Why are maintenance mechanics hard to find for industry?

PostBy: Flyer5 On: Tue Dec 10, 2013 10:38 pm

samhill wrote:Yep! another fault of Obama, everything was fundamentally sound before that fateful day.




Finally!!!!! :D
Flyer5
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Leisure Line WL110
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Leisure Line Pioneer

Re: Why are maintenance mechanics hard to find for industry?

PostBy: Ed.A On: Tue Dec 10, 2013 10:41 pm

SMITTY wrote:Hear hear, Ed!
.


Chit, like I'm supposed to respond to that how??

Here try this: Smitty you Rock! Schooling of hard Fng Knocks served our nation far better and more often that Haaavrd or Yale. Sadly, those who reign from those institutions will fail to realize that a true Muslim Caliphate is in the offing...how people don't see this as the next rising to destroy free nations is beyond me. Has anyone seen Sub-Sahara, Northern Africa as of late? Egypt aligning with Russia? China making moves towards Taiwan and Japan?


My God...we really are stupid people...and will suffer the consequences, sooner than later.
Ed.A
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska Channing III/ '94 Stoker II
Coal Size/Type: Rice

Re: Why are maintenance mechanics hard to find for industry?

PostBy: tsb On: Tue Dec 10, 2013 10:47 pm

Second shift is not a option for some people. A family with both parents working different
shifts creates child care problems. Someone with the skills your company needs can always
get a day shift job. I'd like not to think the guy your looking for is sitting on his ass collecting.
If he is, he's not the guy your looking for. The problem is that someone else found him first
and offered him more money and day work.
tsb
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Binford 2000
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: LL Pioneer top vent
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Saey Hanover II

Re: Why are maintenance mechanics hard to find for industry?

PostBy: stoker-man On: Tue Dec 10, 2013 10:58 pm

Here's a nice thing for any new guy who starts with us: He won't have to worry about being on 2nd shift for long. We have 3 working maintenance guys..... and the boss. All 3 of us can retire in the next year and a half; me in 3 weeks. I'm hanging around for a few more years, I hope.
stoker-man
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: 1981 efm wcb-24 in use 365 days a year
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/Chestnut
Other Heating: Hearthstone wood stove

Re: Why are maintenance mechanics hard to find for industry?

PostBy: scalabro On: Tue Dec 10, 2013 11:26 pm

You guys should pick up a copy of "Shop Class As Soulcraft" by Matthew B. Crawford .... It should be required reading in all high schools.

http://www.matthewbcrawford.com
scalabro
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford 40, PP Stewart No. 14 in the works.
Coal Size/Type: Stove, Anthracite.
Other Heating: Oil fired, forced hot air.

Re: Why are maintenance mechanics hard to find for industry?

PostBy: KLook On: Wed Dec 11, 2013 12:18 am

This whole post is a great read in how to get off your ass and go to work. There is plenty to do and no time to whine about it. I am inspired even though I have a similar story to many of you. I am looking for a different opportunity tomorrow. 8-)

Kevin
KLook
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Harman VF 3000
Coal Size/Type: rice, bagged, Blaschak
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman (Back In Maine)
Stove/Furnace Model: VF 3000

Re: Why are maintenance mechanics hard to find for industry?

PostBy: stoker-man On: Wed Dec 11, 2013 7:00 am

There were some heavy duty shelving units setting outside for the past 6 months and I was told to get rid of them. I had an idea for a Winter project to make a custom toolbox using frame and panel wood around a metal frame and then use it at work. I combined the two units at custom shelf levels and welded everything together.

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stoker-man
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: 1981 efm wcb-24 in use 365 days a year
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/Chestnut
Other Heating: Hearthstone wood stove

Re: Why are maintenance mechanics hard to find for industry?

PostBy: Rick 386 On: Sun Jan 12, 2014 10:36 pm

I don't usually get on this section as I don't do politics well and don't want to keep checking back for debates. But this subject hit home with me.

I have been looking for an employee in my body shop since October/November. My shop is located on a very busy bypass road. I have posted on the shop sign outside the building looking for experienced help since then. No takers. And I'm just looking for entry level to mid level trained candidates. I contacted the local vo-tech schools and was told that they didn't have anyone ready for co-op work. But they had graduates from last year interested. The teacher would contact them. No takers at all.

I have had 2 mechanic trainees but I'm looking for body workers. Then last week I had some prima donna come by who told me how he ran this other shop, did this and that blah, blah and would only want $1000 net per week. Really ???? I would like that and I own the friggin place. It made me wonder if he was this good, why didn't he still work at the other place ???

As was mentioned by others, it seems to me like no one wants to work either. Perhaps they like sitting at home collecting or they don't want to get dirty. It is a tough job and I'm pretty damn particular about the finished product my shop produces. Cars leave my shop looking like nothing was ever done to them except maybe the paint I applied is a little bit more shiny. We have the ability to do that and I expect it. I've been told I am too picky ????

As far as the vo-tech schools go, I have been on the advisory board of 2 of the local schools for the past several years. At 1 meeting the local guy from ATC schools was there. He told us that the job of the vo-tech school was to weed out the students who showed interest in the field so they could then apply to and pay for more education at his place !!! Again WTF ???? I immediately responded that I was under the impression that the vo-tech schools are there to prepare entry level techs to the industry. He could stick his school as it was only another money grabber for kids. HANDS ON is where the real training begins.

That same night there was a graduate there from PENN Tech, the Penn State Vo-tech school in Williamsport, PA. This kid spent 2 years at this school after he graduated from the high school vo-tech school. And his position at the shop he worked at......... paint prepper. He was the kid who sanded primer applied by others. An entry level job at a shop !!!!!!. I told the kid I didn't want to put him down and I meant it but I chastised the school instructors for blowing smoke up this kid's butt by telling him the job he should expect as a graduate....... And the pay he should be getting.

So sm, you are not alone in your quest for qualified workers.




Rick
Rick 386
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AA 260 heating both sides of twin farmhouse
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: LL Hyfire II w/ coaltrol in garage
Coal Size/Type: Pea in AA 260, Rice in LL Hyfire II
Other Heating: Gas fired infared at work

Re: Why are maintenance mechanics hard to find for industry?

PostBy: Hambden Bob On: Sun Jan 12, 2014 11:29 pm

What a Blow-Away Thread this has become ! I've got to remember that I'm not in FSC and watch myself! My Hat's Off in Total Respect and Admiration of you all! Real Men,Real Crap Deals,Curve Balls,and Chuck Holes In The Road Of Life! You've all encountered these things and had the guts to relay them to others. You all may not ever know who you may have inspired. An Old Feller once told me:"Kid,it 'aint how many times you fall....It's how many times you get up !" True Words ! When you're trying to put together an effort that pays off for all involved,you sometimes have to scrub the coal pile for the good stuff! Don't stop,even when sleeze'z and skeeze'z tell you that you're a Fool for trying! Bite Me !!! :crazy: :fear: :woot:
Hambden Bob
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman 1998 Magnum Stoker
Coal Size/Type: Rice-A-Roni !