draft help

Re: draft help

PostBy: bkm1924 On: Wed Dec 11, 2013 4:12 pm

do u mean by pulling the cold air down by using a fan blowing away from the bottom of stairs towards the center of my basement??. My coal stove is approx. 10 feet from the bottom of the stairs. The stairs come down into the middle of the basement itself. I do have oil heat down there with a boiler but it is baseboard heat so no duct work to use
bkm1924
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: alaskan stoker

Re: draft help

PostBy: titleist1 On: Wed Dec 11, 2013 5:09 pm

in our ranch house layout (with the stoker in the basement) the warm air goes up the open basement steps (no door or walls at top). I have the floor vent in the back bedroom (point furthest from the stairwell and always the coolest location) with flex duct dropped to the basement floor. The cool air falls through this floor vent/duct and that actually pulls warmer air into that bedroom.

I do get some cool air falling down the basement steps too.

your layout may have to do something similar. start at the coolest location at the ends of the house and put the floor vent there with flex duct to the basement floor. Let the experimentation begin!! :)
titleist1
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman Mag Stoker (old style) one in basement, one in workshop
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III on standby for long power outages
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite; Nut/Anthracite

Re: draft help

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Wed Dec 11, 2013 5:50 pm

Putting fans in a duct below the vents will help, but you'll need a fan at each vent. And it will also use additional electricity.

To keep the system passive (no electricity needed), you can create a "convection loop". You use the difference in weight of the heavier cold air upstairs, verses the lighter warm air in the basement to naturally move them where you want them. Gravity will be the driving force.

To better understand warm verses cold vents, it might be easier to think of them as two types of vents, "short" and "tall".

The "short" vents only go through the floor. They will let the warm air up.

The "tall" vents also go through the floor, but they have duct work that extends them almost to the basement floor. They let the cold air go down.

By having some air vents open to the warm air at the basement ceiling, and using other vents with ducts that extend the cold air vent opening down near the basement floor, you naturally prevent the cold air upstairs from damming up the warm air vents. That difference in duct length "steers" the air to form a convection loop. Then the upstairs heavier cold air will sink to the basement floor pushing the warm basement air up through the warm air vents.

If you have rooms that you close the door and you want them to stay warm, the closed door will short-circuit the loop. Therefore, you have to give each room their own convection loop. In other words, a cold air return vent and a warm air vent in each room.

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace


Re: draft help

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Wed Dec 11, 2013 5:55 pm

titleist1 wrote:in our ranch house layout (with the stoker in the basement) the warm air goes up the open basement steps (no door or walls at top). I have the floor vent in the back bedroom (point furthest from the stairwell and always the coolest location) with flex duct dropped to the basement floor. The cool air falls through this floor vent/duct and that actually pulls warmer air into that bedroom.

I do get some cool air falling down the basement steps too.

your layout may have to do something similar. start at the coolest location at the ends of the house and put the floor vent there with flex duct to the basement floor. Let the experimentation begin!! :)



This is a good starting point. Get the coldest air down to the basement floor. It will have greater convection driving force the colder it is.

Paul.
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Re: draft help

PostBy: dcrane On: Wed Dec 11, 2013 10:26 pm

Lightning wrote:
bkm1924 wrote:thanks for the welcome.

Should I install fans on the basement ceiling to push air up through the vents or just have a fan on the basement floor moving the air around. Like I said this is all new to me so just looking for all the help I can get at this point


This is what I what I would try first. A couple little fans on the basement ceiling to push warm air up thru the vents.

Heres a few -

http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywor ... f6sozxl4_b


it is very hard for new folks to understand the dynamics of air, heat, draft and flow (I too think the vents are doing the exact opposite of what you intended them to do). depending on location of basement door / stove... i would put as large a vent as possible above the stove with a booster fan up then place a smaller vent with no fan way over their>>>>>>> opposite side of house from stove. Then you dont have to keep your basement door open. This will hopefully create enough of a correct flow to satisfy.... if not.... come back and we will take the next steps :cry:
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: draft help

PostBy: Lee1 On: Thu Dec 12, 2013 9:09 am

I also have a Alaska channing 3, have it installed in unfinished basement. (Ranch house) I had a 7 inch cold air return installed from bedroom upstairs back to stoker (farthest room upstairs) and reduced 7 inch to 6 inch and installed flex hose to convection blower of stoker.(265 cfm) So warm air comes up cellar stairs through kitchen, living room and finally is pulled (vacuum) through cold air vent in bedroom down the hall. I have created a convection loop. I also placed a filter at vent. I have also put in line a cold air booster blower (365 cfm) to help cold air return turn more volume over. 1100 sq ft home (basement also 1100 sq ft) and I do not burn any oil all winter!
Lee1
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska Channing 3

Re: draft help

PostBy: Rick 386 On: Thu Dec 12, 2013 8:07 pm

bkm,

A quick experiment would be to place small window fans over top of the vents and blow the air down to the basement. If that works, all you will have to do is refine the way you want that to work.

Drops to the floor from the vent may take a while to move the air. The fans will force the issue in a relatively small amount of time.



Rick
Rick 386
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AA 260 heating both sides of twin farmhouse
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: LL Hyfire II w/ coaltrol in garage
Coal Size/Type: Pea in AA 260, Rice in LL Hyfire II
Other Heating: Gas fired infared at work

Re: draft help

PostBy: warren On: Wed Jan 01, 2014 4:44 pm

I used one inch foil backed styrofoam insulation board and built a hood over my stove in the basement and directed the heat from it thru a vent in the floor. not rapid heat but a lot better than just cutting vents. you could try a small fan on vent farthest from stove blowing down in basement. much easier to move cold air down.
warren
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: othello wood/coal cook stove
Coal Size/Type: hard nut
Other Heating: outside furnace