Oak stove pros an cons

Oak stove pros an cons

PostBy: Den034071 On: Sun Dec 15, 2013 2:29 pm

Hi oak stove owners .Please your comments .I see at house auctions here in Pa. quite a few Oak stoves but all did not have the indirect backpipe .A Columbian blue porcelain oak with a 13 times 15 deep firebox sold for 500 bucks .Skirts an nickel wings an finial were somewhat dull from age .How do these do in fall spring temps .I have also seen green porcelain stove .Rest of Blue stove was solid but i left it go .Please give me your comments. thanks
Den034071
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer, 3095

Re: Oak stove pros an cons

PostBy: PJT On: Sun Dec 15, 2013 8:19 pm

Hi Jack

I too seem to see a lot more oaks than any other type of antique parlor stove for sale in my area. They must have made more of them than most others or maybe people are more willing to part with them?
PJT
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Magee Royal Oak; Glenwood Modern Oak 116
Other Heating: propane

Re: Oak stove pros an cons

PostBy: coalcracker On: Tue Dec 17, 2013 12:10 am

Den034071 wrote:Hi oak stove owners .Please your comments .I see at house auctions here in Pa. quite a few Oak stoves but all did not have the indirect backpipe .A Columbian blue porcelain oak with a 13 times 15 deep firebox sold for 500 bucks .Skirts an nickel wings an finial were somewhat dull from age .How do these do in fall spring temps .I have also seen green porcelain stove .Rest of Blue stove was solid but i left it go .Please give me your comments. thanks



The problem with the OLD stoves with big round firepots, is they had cast iron firepots, brittle, ancient metallurgy, prone to cracking. This goes for any of them, oaks, baseburners/baseheaters, backheaters, radiant micas, double burners, etc. If the round firebrick insert burned out, and they continued to fire the stove, the cast iron firepot is a dead player, it'll be cracked on the larger stoves. The smaller size firepots are more durable, because smaller ones have more structural rigidity.

I have a Lehigh Oak with an 18" firepot that was cracked half way around. We paid $100 for it, and while loading it in the station wagon, noticed it was cracked. The antique dealer said "keep it" and handed us our $100 back. We did him a favor taking it away. At that point it's good for scrap, or parts, unless it's a highly rare valuable model worth restoring. A new firepot is a lot of money, like $450 with shipping back and forth- you have to send your old one in repaired with cement, to make a casting mould from.

There is a beautiful stove on Ebay now, with a cracked firepot. Here's a picture of it. Imagine laying out a couple grand for this. Need I say more ? Ebay is now filled with stoves that are cracked. The sellers take pictures of the cracks and post them in their ads, to cover their return liability. There's about 5 vintage stoves on their now with closeups of cracked castings. Deleting posts about this here, doesn't cover the truth. It just becomes a badge of honor, for the guy trying to inform everyone about it.

There's a darn good reason why they don't make stoves like this anymore. It's got nothing to do with efficiency, it has to do with reputation. WTH would want to warranty something like this today ? If that cracks and the coals fall out and burn the house down, and kill the family and kids, the judge and jury won't care too much about efficiency of the stove

It has to do with simple thermodynamics and physics- heat any iron or steel that's a round hole, it gets larger. How do we get a rusted bolt off ? Heat it, then it comes free. Heat the big firepot enough, it expands and can only go so far, cast being less malleable than steel- and it cracks.
Last edited by Richard S. on Tue Dec 17, 2013 3:37 am, edited 2 times in total.
Reason: Removed Copyrighted File
coalcracker
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Standard sealed hot water boiler, hand fed
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Baseburners & Antiques: Lehigh Oak 18, Washington potbelly, Sears Roebuck parlor cabinet, PIttston 6 lid cook stove, vintage combo gas/coal cook stove 4 lid
Coal Size/Type: nut
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: Mark I Magnafire

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Re: Oak stove pros an cons

PostBy: DePippo79 On: Tue Dec 17, 2013 4:48 am

It all comes down to buyer beware. I wouldn't discount a antique stove just because of someone elses experience. There are plenty of good stoves out there and several reputable restoration shops. Glenwood Oak in the basement of my drafty old victorian woke up at 0230 first floor living space 72 deg. upstairs (bedrooms) 65 deg. outside temp 7 deg. Den keep doing your research. Nothing against new stoves, but I wanted something that goes with my house. I bought mine fully restored, but a new stove would have cost the same if not more. Redoing a Stanley Argand now and believe me if your even somewhat mechanically inclined you could restore one yourself. Not much to them. Good Luck. Matt
Last edited by DePippo79 on Tue Dec 17, 2013 5:01 am, edited 1 time in total.
DePippo79
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Oak 40, Stanley Argand No. 30, Glenwood Modern Oak 114, Stanley Argand No. 20 missing parts.
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite. Stove and nut size.
Other Heating: Oil hot water.

Re: Oak stove pros an cons

PostBy: DePippo79 On: Tue Dec 17, 2013 4:49 am

Forgot to mention I'm not even running the stove hard. Barely 500 deg. Matt
DePippo79
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Oak 40, Stanley Argand No. 30, Glenwood Modern Oak 114, Stanley Argand No. 20 missing parts.
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite. Stove and nut size.
Other Heating: Oil hot water.

Re: Oak stove pros an cons

PostBy: dcrane On: Tue Dec 17, 2013 7:42 am

many oaks had refractory liners as well, there is little doubt in my mind (or anyone else's who knows anything about strength and coal burning in a hand fired) that round is better & stronger (the egg theory or igloo theory if you will)... as far as cast iron goes, the castings of today vs castings of yesteryear are very different (im not a chemist) but im sorry... yesterdays cast iron is better, stronger, finer and lighter http://blackirondude.blogspot.com/2008/ ... -iron.html . (the casting in this example is the exact same as you find in stove comparisons... the case iron was just incredible 100+ years ago when looking at the doors of a 150 year old Glenwood compared to the thick, rough, heavy cast doors on a modern stove). The reason some of these epic marvels of engineering are not reproduced is the cost involved in doing it vs the market for such a product (not the fear its a bad design or bad product)... we should all be so lucky as to have products last 200 years and still function like some of these beauties! One does have to be aware of condition on "key" parts and/or cracked cast iron but lets not go off the deep end and say for some reason old cast iron sucks because that is false. you can search threads using the search box upper right corner of page, type "antique stoves", "Oak stoves", etc. and you will learn a lot!

I think for all practical purposes you cannot expect to obtain a good, fully functional, ready to use parlor stove (be it Oak, Dbl heater, Baseburner, Mica, etc) for much less than $2000.00. You might get one for $200.00 or $500.00 or $800.00 but you should expect at the very least to have to put $1,000 in parts and/or time/labor to make it "proper & ready" to burn for decades to to come (even if all the castings are acceptable). Most of us do this for the love of it.... it makes just as much sense to simply pay the $2000.00 and go buy a beautifully reconditioned Oak w/ dbl heater from an a reputable antique stove shop (it prob. makes MORE sense actually!)
dcrane
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404

Re: Oak stove pros an cons

PostBy: Sunny Boy On: Tue Dec 17, 2013 10:25 am

From what I've read, the Glenwoods were made from local "bog iron", which is supposed to be a higher quality iron.

In contrast, another large stove company I'm a bit familiar with, that was said to have made over one million stoves, is the Rathbone and Sard Acorn range that my girlfriends family had. Both kitchen ranges are roughly the same sizes, and about the same age. Both stoves show hard use. The R&S top plates were filled with cracks.

In eight years of searching the internet, I've only seen several R&S parlor stoves. I've yet to find evidence of another surviving R&S kitchen range.

The type of iron used could very well account for the major differences in survival rates. And it may be worth looking where the iron came from for the other high survival rate stove makers.

That's why, when I wanted another stove, I went looking for Glenwoods.

Paul
Sunny Boy
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

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