Rotten Eggs

Re: Rotten Eggs

PostBy: 2001Sierra On: Thu Dec 19, 2013 12:38 am

I check my Baro semi weekly. I too found a similar result when I swept my block chimney on year 2 of my stoker. I used to seep the chimney yearly with the hand fed and not much ever came out so I would just vacuum the bottom yearly. After the second year of the stoker I swept the chimney, and at the thimble which is where I clean out, it looked like a snow bank! I embarrassed myself with the accumulation.Stokers can really put some ash up the chimney as I found out. You never can be too careful.
Merry Christmas to All :D
2001Sierra
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90 Chimney vent
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Other Heating: Buderus Oil Boiler 3115-34
Stove/Furnace Model: Keystoker 90 Chimney Vent

Re: Rotten Eggs

PostBy: Lightning On: Thu Dec 19, 2013 4:00 am

I hate to say it out loud, but it makes me wonder if all the fly ash in the pipe is a result of excessive combustion air that would impair efficiency. :o
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash

Re: Rotten Eggs

PostBy: heatwithcoal On: Thu Dec 19, 2013 6:37 am

It has been running full time for maybe 2 months. Now i know my cleaning schedule :D
After cleaning out the pipe and changing the dirty air filter, as suggested by Dave, all is running fine this morning. I think i will try to eliminate one elbow in the spring

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Stove pipe increases from 6" to 8" after elbow exiting the stove.

Mark
heatwithcoal
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: AK-110
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: AK-110

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Re: Rotten Eggs

PostBy: Lightning On: Thu Dec 19, 2013 7:28 am

Yes, I would run a sloped pipe and take out the 90 in the middle. Then put a T at the top before the thimble to put the barometric on. It could probably be done in a couple hours if you decided to do it sooner. :)
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash

Re: Rotten Eggs

PostBy: coalkirk On: Thu Dec 19, 2013 7:33 am

It is suprising how quickly the fly ash can accumulate. Replace your elbows with T's and you can clean out the ash in less than a minute and never have this problem again. I fired up mid October and did the first flyash clean out the first week of December. It wasn't as bad as your picture but bad enough.
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This picture doesn't show it but I've got the same T arrangement at the bottom. Pop of the caps on the T's and a stick the shop vac wand in there and you are done. Don't even have to shut down.
coalkirk
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Harman VF3000
Coal Size/Type: antrhcite/rice coal

Re: Rotten Eggs

PostBy: heatwithcoal On: Thu Dec 19, 2013 8:29 am

It is supposed to be in the 50's this weekend. Seems like a good project this weekend while my in-laws are in from out of state. I could probably stretch it out to 4 hours of quiet in the basement if I have a few beers while working on it.
:beer:
heatwithcoal
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: AK-110
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: AK-110

Re: Rotten Eggs

PostBy: Lightning On: Thu Dec 19, 2013 9:11 am

Perfect hahaha!
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash

Re: Rotten Eggs

PostBy: heatwithcoal On: Thu Dec 19, 2013 9:35 am

coalkirk,

Where is your baro on your set up?
heatwithcoal
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: AK-110
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: AK-110

Re: Rotten Eggs

PostBy: Pacowy On: Fri Dec 27, 2013 11:37 am

heatwithcoal wrote: Stove pipe increases from 6" to 8" after elbow exiting the stove.

Mark


AFAIK the increase in stove pipe size causes the speed with which the exhaust gases are moving to diminish. Having the increase occur at the bottom of a vertical section of pipe accentuates the accumulation of fly ash you get at that point. Without reworking all of the smoke pipe, if space permits you might be able to remedy this by replacing the first elbow with a tee, with one outlet from the tee facing the floor and forming a "trap" for some of the fly ash. Frequent checking/cleaning would still be needed, but this would leave the unit better able to withstand fly ash accumulation.

Mike
Pacowy
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: H.B. Smith 350 Mills boiler/EFM 85R stoker
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/anthracite

Re: Rotten Eggs

PostBy: Rob R. On: Fri Dec 27, 2013 2:01 pm

Pacowy wrote:
heatwithcoal wrote: Stove pipe increases from 6" to 8" after elbow exiting the stove.

Mark


AFAIK the increase in stove pipe size causes the speed with which the exhaust gases are moving to diminish. Having the increase occur at the bottom of a vertical section of pipe accentuates the accumulation of fly ash you get at that point. Without reworking all of the smoke pipe, if space permits you might be able to remedy this by replacing the first elbow with a tee, with one outlet from the tee facing the floor and forming a "trap" for some of the fly ash. Frequent checking/cleaning would still be needed, but this would leave the unit better able to withstand fly ash accumulation.

Mike


Great idea. I think it would work even better if the tee is a few inches larger than the flue outlet. Come off the furnace with 6" and go into an 8" tee, then run 6" to the chimney. The "slow down" should occur in the tee and drop the flyash into the "trap".
Rob R.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Other Heating: Dad's 1953 EFM Highboy

Re: Rotten Eggs

PostBy: Lightning On: Fri Dec 27, 2013 2:03 pm

Franco and I were just discussing a fly ash trap. Seems like a good idea. Isn't there anything like that on the market?
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut Size / White Ash

Re: Rotten Eggs

PostBy: Pacowy On: Fri Dec 27, 2013 3:31 pm

Rob R. wrote: I think it would work even better if the tee is a few inches larger than the flue outlet. Come off the furnace with 6" and go into an 8" tee, then run 6" to the chimney. The "slow down" should occur in the tee and drop the flyash into the "trap".


x2. The reducer should go first and the tee should be 8". I should try looking more closely at the pics. :lol:

Mike
Pacowy
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: H.B. Smith 350 Mills boiler/EFM 85R stoker
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/anthracite

Re: Rotten Eggs

PostBy: Uglysquirrel On: Fri Dec 27, 2013 8:34 pm

We as a forum do not emphasize periodic cleaning as a safety and efficiency requirement.

Is it reasonable to say that stokers in general create more ash accumulation in the exhaust system ?

What is a good general cleaning frequency ? I'm thinking every 5-6 weeks.
Uglysquirrel
 
Stove/Furnace Model: Pocono

Re: Rotten Eggs

PostBy: Rob R. On: Fri Dec 27, 2013 9:38 pm

It depends on the unit and the amount of coal burned. 5-6 weeks is a good starting point, if it is found to be clean then extend the cleaning interval. I clean my EFM 3 times per year (every 3 tons) but could go longer. My dad's gets cleaned once per year.
Rob R.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Other Heating: Dad's 1953 EFM Highboy

Re: Rotten Eggs

PostBy: Flyer5 On: Fri Dec 27, 2013 10:19 pm

I generally tell people to clean at least twice a month with a new installation. Then after getting their experience they can make an assessment for their own schedule. Every setup is different. But most can go 5-6 weeks easily. But it still needs to be routinely checked.
Flyer5
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Leisure Line WL110
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Leisure Line Pioneer

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