Reloading Center fire ammo

Reloading Center fire ammo

PostBy: Dirty Steve On: Wed Jan 15, 2014 12:12 pm

I am thinking about getting into reloading for centerfire ammo. Rifle mostly. I do have a 9mm semi auto pistol though. I have had trouble finding ammo for Remington 7mm Ultramag. $50-$60 a box of twenty when you do find it. I've hunted deer with that for years but recently bought a 30.06 because I could find that ammo alot easier. Now I find myself looking for some .06 ammo that is apparently fairly exotic and scarce. 165 grain trophy bonded tip from Federal premium. Price is around forty for that one. I did just find a box of Hornaday Superformance in 165 gr with balistic tip. The gun is Benelli R1 in 30.06. Was steered toward tipped ammo by the Benelli shooters forum. It sucks having to buy $40 boxes of ammo to try to figure out what groups the best.

I have never reloaded and had no idea where to start. I understand intial equipment investment can be pricey. What manufacturers do people suggest for a beginner? Kits? Single stage vs. turret? Progressive presses which can crank out hundreds of loads an hour don't seem practical for my use. Any brand to stay away from? I saw good reviews on the turret from Lyman- T-mag II. Any one use one? What about single stage presses or kits?

Thanks, Steve
Dirty Steve
 
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Re: Reloading Center fire ammo

PostBy: Wanna Bee On: Wed Jan 15, 2014 12:46 pm

If all you want to do is turn out 100+/- 7mm a year. Rcbs single stage rock chucker is where I'd start.
Wanna Bee
 
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Re: Reloading Center fire ammo

PostBy: Billyirons On: Wed Jan 15, 2014 12:59 pm

I also have just decided to reload ammo. I found some reloading equipment at Midway USA.
I learned a little from reading the posted reviews. I decided to spend a 'little' money for a Lee single stage and decide
if it was really worth spending a lot more money for a multi-stage.
Unfortunately, I cannot use anything yet because the powder that I need has been out of stock since November!
Billyirons
 
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Re: Reloading Center fire ammo

PostBy: grumpy On: Wed Jan 15, 2014 2:29 pm

Single Stage is all you need, in fact I think its better... but thats just my opinion..
grumpy
 

Re: Reloading Center fire ammo

PostBy: Involute On: Wed Jan 15, 2014 2:43 pm

I reload on a Dillon 550B progressive, but that's mostly high volume handgun ammo that I do. For lower volume rifle, single stage is fine - I'd second the RCBS Rock Chucker recommendation.
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Re: Reloading Center fire ammo

PostBy: Dirty Steve On: Wed Jan 15, 2014 3:00 pm

I have looked a Rock Chuckers and other single stage presses before over the years and don't know why I never bought one other than lack of knowledge and exposure to reloading. For those with immediate knowledge of single stage reloaders- are the kits worth the money or would you suggest just getting the press and buying better scales and other supplies?
Dirty Steve
 
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Re: Reloading Center fire ammo

PostBy: grumpy On: Wed Jan 15, 2014 3:05 pm

I should have said for rifle, hand gun, Yeah crank em out, I would look for used stuff someone is looking to dump, I got an old press, all cast iron, weighs a ton, works great, paid $15.
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Re: Reloading Center fire ammo

PostBy: SuperBeetle On: Wed Jan 15, 2014 3:09 pm

I've used RCBS Rock Chucker for 30+ years. For priming cases I use a Lee Auto Prime. Reloading is getting rather expensive too. I pick up a lot of components at auctions and sometimes yard sales as well. I also scrounge around shooting ranges for brass too. Of course, I always bought odd calibers like .41 Rem Mag and .221 Fireball and reloading has always been second nature to me.
SuperBeetle
 
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Re: Reloading Center fire ammo

PostBy: KLook On: Wed Jan 15, 2014 5:37 pm

Ditto with these guys for me. I have the old RCBS Rockchucker and an even older Herters turret set up to just seat bullets. Look around as there are good deals on used stuff and it don't really wear out. You can get as fancy as you like but get started with basics and make decisions about the bells and whistles as you learn. Be sure and read as much as possible about reloading safety. I like the new edition of the LEE Reloading Manual. It gets a bit annoying when he runs down other auto primers, but I use the LEE as well.

Kevin

I should add I do not like the new Lee Autoprime. the 2 stage primer lift is annoying as hell and my cover is bent and lets primers flip over. The old style was bullet proof if you used your head.
KLook
 
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Re: Reloading Center fire ammo

PostBy: Wanna Bee On: Wed Jan 15, 2014 8:38 pm

Dirty Steve wrote:I have looked a Rock Chuckers and other single stage presses before over the years and don't know why I never bought one other than lack of knowledge and exposure to reloading. For those with immediate knowledge of single stage reloaders- are the kits worth the money or would you suggest just getting the press and buying better scales and other supplies?


Sorry I was unable to give you a better answer earlier, I was short on time.

The Kits aren't a bad way to get started. Your going to need just about everything that's included. You might end up graduating to a big better scale. A different primer setting tool, but you still need something to get started. Another thing to do would be, go out and buy yourself a hand loading manual. Your going to need lots of them and they are cheap. Every time I change projectile manufactures I buy their manual. It takes the guesswork out of hand loading and keeps things a little safer. There are plenty of guys that will disagree with me on this but I'm also looking at ballistic coefficients too. If you buy the Hornady one it gives you a very detailed description of the, hows and what's of hand loading. I load a lot of Hornady bullets so it comes in mighty handy. Rock chucker comes with a Speer manual I think, so you won't end up with duplicates.

As far as single stage vs progressive. I'd load high volumes of pistol cartridges on a progressive. All of my rifle cartridges get weighed and assembled one by one on a single stage press.
Wanna Bee
 
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Re: Reloading Center fire ammo

PostBy: Rob R. On: Thu Jan 16, 2014 6:23 am

If you want to get into reloading as a hobby, look around and talk to some friends that are already into it. You might find someone that is ready to upgrade and willing to sell you some equipment for a reasonable price.

If all you want is to produce cartridges that you can't find otherwise, there are plenty of custom loaders that will make loads to your specs. That Federal .30-06 should be available...have you tried Cabella's or asked a local shop to order it for you?

My dad has a .350 and a 6.5mm Remington Mag., finding ammo for them is very tough.
Rob R.
 
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Re: Reloading Center fire ammo

PostBy: I'm On Fire On: Thu Jul 17, 2014 7:43 am

Sorry to piggy back my question off of this thread but I felt that maybe it was better to post here as opposed to starting a new thread.

I'm not sure if it's a good idea or not given how new to shooting I am but I've been reading a lot about firearms, ammo and reloading. I'm curious, would it be beneficial to reload my own ammo or is it not a good idea since I'm so very new to this? I keep looking at the prices of ammo and then looking at prices for ammo components/supplies and I'm kind of curious if it's something I should get into.

Should I just stick to buying ammo for when I go to the range and wait until I get better at shooting? I figure the initial cost of equipment is going to be like buying a gun initially, very expensive but then I figure that over time it'll pay for itself and I'd save money. I'm just kind of spit balling here so if anyone has any input it'd be appreciated. Hell, I'm not even sure of what to get. But I currently only shoot 9mm and .45 ACP but do have plans in the immediate future to shoot 12 ga. and rifle cartridges of some sort; still undecided on a rifle right now, there are so many I like so choosing one is going to have to be nailed down first.

I have however been looking at the Lee Pro 1000 Beginner Kit if anyone is interested. I'd also like some suggestions one where to start with manuals and equipment. But at the same time, if you guys feel that I'd be better off not getting into reloading/handloading then by all means tell me. Like I said I'm completely green with this hobby so if you guys think it's not wise tell me. I've currently got no plans on buying anything until I'm ready anyway. I'm just trying to gather information.
I'm On Fire
 
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Re: Reloading Center fire ammo

PostBy: mozz On: Thu Jul 17, 2014 4:46 pm

I'd be more worried about finding all the components. Primers used to be 1000/$12, powder was 1lb/$15, brass was fairly cheap. If you can find all the items, figure out how much to reload 1000 rounds. Save all your brass you are shooting now. Also figure out spending a lot of time doing (and learning) this. Sometimes you can find someone with a press and give him your brass and get reloads a lot cheaper than buying off the shelf.
mozz
 
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Re: Reloading Center fire ammo

PostBy: KLook On: Thu Jul 17, 2014 8:17 pm

I'd be more worried about finding all the components. Primers used to be 1000/$12, powder was 1lb/$15, brass was fairly cheap. If you can find all the items, figure out how much to reload 1000 rounds. Save all your brass you are shooting now. Also figure out spending a lot of time doing (and learning) this. Sometimes you can find someone with a press and give him your brass and get reloads a lot cheaper than buying off the shelf.


This for sure. It is an investment in time and you have to have the time as the learning curve dictates. IF you want to blast away, it means hours of reloading even with a Progressive press. For those of us that loaded em one at a time for accuracy and hunting, it just made sense. Many of my friends moved on to cast bullets and low pressure loads, I did not follow. I started at a time when all premium bullets had to be reloaded. All the manufacturers had was standard bullets. After years of using everything I could, I ended up just using Rem. Core-Lokt. Can't justify spending .50 per bullet to shoot a deer that does not know the difference.
It is a wonderful hobby and will educate you about ballistics and much more, but saving money is probably not a good reason to do it. More shooting equals more money, more time reloading, and time is money.

Kevin
KLook
 
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Re: Reloading Center fire ammo

PostBy: harley On: Thu Jul 17, 2014 11:00 pm

I have been reloading for many years and find a single stage is the best for accuracy RCBS would be your best bet as they have different starter kits and yes you can save a substantial amount of money not only that but it is enjoyable knowing what you are shooting is what you have made i have had several factory rounds miss fire over the past 40 years have never had a hand load do that Good Luck and enjoy

I would suggest you do some reading on the process first
harley
 
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