do you question this study?

do you question this study?

PostBy: dave brode On: Mon Jan 27, 2014 4:45 pm

http://www.csmonitor.com/Environment/20 ... -oil-2-526

I question the low cost of heating with elec. Am I wrong? I wonder if the elec producers had any influence in the study? I wonder what kilowatt cost was used?

Dave
dave brode
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KAA-2
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: used to have a 5 section Red Square
Coal Size/Type: rice anthracite

Re: do you question this study?

PostBy: Lightning On: Mon Jan 27, 2014 5:39 pm

Yes that's ridiculous... :lol:

"The use of electric heat is on the rise, even in the frosty Northeast. Cost is a main draw, although some homeowners complain that electric heat isn’t as efficient as other fuels. Nationally, about a third of US homes rely on electricity as their primary heating source."

isn't as efficient?? really?? Maybe not cost efficient!! :lol:
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Stove Size Mix

Re: do you question this study?

PostBy: Freddy On: Mon Jan 27, 2014 5:42 pm

I think someone thumped them head side with a 2 by 4. Certainly where I live in Maine those numbers are way off...WAY.
Freddy
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 130 (pea)
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Reading piece o' junk in the barn (rice)
Coal Size/Type: Pea size, Superior, deep mined


Re: do you question this study?

PostBy: titleist1 On: Mon Jan 27, 2014 5:43 pm

Using the fuel calculator at current reasonable prices, $4 for oil and getting to their total oil cost, electric would have to be $0.06 per kW to hit their $1315 cost in the article. Our electric rates are double that!
titleist1
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman Mag Stoker (old style) one in basement, one in workshop
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III on standby for long power outages
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite; Nut/Anthracite

Re: do you question this study?

PostBy: Lightning On: Mon Jan 27, 2014 5:45 pm

I'm sure they aren't counting "supply charge" which is just as much or more the cost of per kilowatt..
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Stove Size Mix

Re: do you question this study?

PostBy: blrman07 On: Mon Jan 27, 2014 6:14 pm

Total bill divided by number of KW used in NEPA comes to 17+ cents. Per my calculations heating by electricity in my area is the most costly, even more than #2~~~

Rev. Larry
New Beginning Church
Ashland Pa.
blrman07
 
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Bucket a Day
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vigilant Casting 2310
Baseburners & Antiques: rebuilding a 1906 March Brownback Double Heater, using a UMCO 1920's Pot Belly stove in the church
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Wood in the VC and anything that will fit in the Bucket a Day. It's not fussy.

Re: do you question this study?

PostBy: Richard S. On: Mon Jan 27, 2014 6:15 pm

Lightning wrote:I'm sure they aren't counting "supply charge" which is just as much or more the cost of per kilowatt..


It's certainly not that much here, I think it's like 3 cents added to 8 cents.

Something is seriously flawed, they must of used the wholesale cost for electric, the industrial rates or some kind of average rate across all sectors.

Email sent:
Something is seriously flawed with your article on energy prices, there is no way electric is anywhere near the cost of natural gas. May I ask what you used for references?
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

Re: do you question this study?

PostBy: titleist1 On: Mon Jan 27, 2014 6:36 pm

Using data from the website they reference, the 2012 average cost per KW in New England and NJ, NY & PA is 15.59 cents.

#2 would have to be around $5 /gal in a 75% efficient unit to cost more than electric.
titleist1
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman Mag Stoker (old style) one in basement, one in workshop
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III on standby for long power outages
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite; Nut/Anthracite

Re: do you question this study?

PostBy: lsayre On: Mon Jan 27, 2014 6:54 pm

The only way electricity could be that inexpensive is to look at a home which has a heat pump and is located in a place where it seldom gets below about 32 degrees F. outside.

I just estimated that if my home was still all electric my electric bill for this month would be in the neighborhood of $740.
Last edited by lsayre on Mon Jan 27, 2014 6:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.
lsayre
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AHS S130 Coal Gun
Coal Size/Type: Stockton Anthracite Pea
Other Heating: Resistance Boiler (13.5 KW)

Re: do you question this study?

PostBy: Richard S. On: Mon Jan 27, 2014 6:56 pm

lsayre wrote:The only way electricity could be that inexpensive is to look at a home which has a heat pump and is located in a place where it seldom gets below about 32 degrees F. outside.



Didn't think of that, that makes sense too.
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

Re: do you question this study?

PostBy: Richard S. On: Mon Jan 27, 2014 7:33 pm

Got response and awating further clarification however it appears from the URL that article is from 2012. It's still wrong but very dated.
Richard S.
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite

Re: do you question this study?

PostBy: michaelanthony On: Mon Jan 27, 2014 7:46 pm

I wouldn't trust any article that states...."customers say electricity isn't as efficient as other heating fuels"....I understand electricity is 100% efficient.
michaelanthony
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vigilant 2310, gold marc box, vogelzang pot belly coat rack
Coal Size/Type: Pea, and a little nut
Other Heating: Very cold FHA oil furnace

Re: do you question this study?

PostBy: david78 On: Mon Jan 27, 2014 7:56 pm

Using the calculator on this site and the fuels available in my area and local prices, the cost per million BTU comes out like this:
Wood: $6.49
Coal: $15.62
Wood pellets: $18.94
Electric: $27.26
Fuel oil: $33.93
Propane: $39.42
david78
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Fuller & Warren Splendid Oak 27
Coal Size/Type: Nut

Re: do you question this study?

PostBy: lsayre On: Mon Jan 27, 2014 8:01 pm

I've found that with electricity the "delivered" cost is roughly double (or more) the officially listed cost per KWH.

Where I live the cost per KWH as listed on my monthly bill is currently a tad less than $0.06 per KWH, but I'm paying $0.133 per "delivered" KWH.

Divide the bill as paid by the KWH's consumed for the month to reveal the real price you are paying.

Say you used 600 KWH, and the cost to you was $80.

$80/600KWH = $0.133 per KWH on a delivered basis.
Last edited by lsayre on Mon Jan 27, 2014 8:03 pm, edited 2 times in total.
lsayre
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: AHS S130 Coal Gun
Coal Size/Type: Stockton Anthracite Pea
Other Heating: Resistance Boiler (13.5 KW)

Re: do you question this study?

PostBy: Lightning On: Mon Jan 27, 2014 8:02 pm

Richard S. wrote:It's certainly not that much here, I think it's like 3 cents added to 8 cents.
At least half and sometimes even more than half of my total bill is supply charge... :(
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Stove Size Mix