A tale of CO and lessons learned

Re: A tale of CO and lessons learned

PostBy: nwaelder On: Fri Jan 31, 2014 9:06 pm

Despite being early in 2014, I'm going to nominate this post as the best of the year in multiple categories.
Thanks, Coalkirk.
nwaelder
 

Re: A tale of CO and lessons learned

PostBy: gjambor On: Fri Jan 31, 2014 9:11 pm

I just purchased a Dwyer mark 11 25 on Amazon for for $34.00. comes with fluid. Just needed to buy a 1/8 inch brake line repair kit at Napa , $18.00 it is copper with several different fittings
gjambor
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska Channing III
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 30-95
Coal Size/Type: RICE COAL/ nut coal
Other Heating: HEAT PUMP
Stove/Furnace Make: alaska channing III

Re: A tale of CO and lessons learned

PostBy: Uglysquirrel On: Fri Jan 31, 2014 9:20 pm

Great Lessons.

Good problem solving logic.

Ug
Uglysquirrel
 
Stove/Furnace Model: Pocono


Re: A tale of CO and lessons learned

PostBy: Keepaeyeonit On: Fri Jan 31, 2014 9:34 pm

Well Coalkirk I feel your pain,I have had 3 CO problems in the last 3 years thank god I have none since I repaired my chimney this fall but this is a good reminder not to take things for granted.I will tell anyone that heats with flame(gas,wood,coal,and oil hell even electric can be a fire hazard) to have redundant CO and smoke alarms in the house,I have 2 battery powered,3 plug in w/battery back up,and a hard wired to a monitored alarm system CO and smoke/heat detector plus battery powered smoke alarms in every room.I love to be warm but its not worth anyones life ;) .Keepaeyeonit
Keepaeyeonit
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 983 insert
Coal Size/Type: Mammoth nut
Other Heating: oil furnace,and a crappy heat pump

Re: A tale of CO and lessons learned

PostBy: titleist1 On: Fri Jan 31, 2014 11:52 pm

Glad you are OK and shared your experience so others can learn from it.
I know what you mean by hearing the oil burner. My furnace came on at 4 this morning and woke me up. Went downstairs and the stoker was dark & cold and pushing coal into the ash pan. No CO reading on the monitors so I just shut it down since I was heading out at 5 anyway. It bugged me all day that the furnace was being used but I am glad I have backup systems. After cleaning and checking things out this evening, the only cause I can come up with is the combustion blower was plugged into a loose receptacle and it wobbled to the no contact position. Took the opportunity to clean it all out real well and swapped in a set of used replacement grates. Now I am sitting here adjusting the feed and air every hour to match up with the new grates...overshot on the first setting a little....830* on the front!! Got it dialed back a bit now!
titleist1
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman Mag Stoker (old style) one in basement, one in workshop
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III on standby for long power outages
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite; Nut/Anthracite

Re: A tale of CO and lessons learned

PostBy: Freddy On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 5:50 am

First, I'm glad you & your loved ones are OK.

Second, sorry to hear you are out of the one match club. Dag-nab it!

Third, thanks for the fun, yet serious, story. You write well. Salmon induced CO.... wow. ;)
Freddy
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 130 (pea)
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Reading piece o' junk in the barn (rice)
Coal Size/Type: Pea size, Superior, deep mined

Re: A tale of CO and lessons learned

PostBy: theo On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 7:18 am

You all our going to think that I'am nuts ( long story short ) but I had my co det. go off a few years back. We have 3 of the det. upstairs and the only one that would go off was in the kitchen. I checked everything out and just could not come up with a reason this was happening, then I thought about something,,,, sounds crazy but the wife was baking chicken in the oven when this happened, well a few weeks before this I was watching either 20/20 or one of those other shows ( cant think of the name's of them now ) and they had a segment on the show about how companies were using Co2 to keep the meat red longer, they even said that some companies were somehow experaminteing on injecting this into the meat. It sounds crazy but I never had the co det. go off after that one time ,,, Could it have been????????? Here is a quick link I found about Co and the meat. http://www.jsfoodbrokers.com/co2-pads-meat-poultry.html
theo
 
Stove/Furnace Make: LL
Stove/Furnace Model: Hyfire 2

Re: A tale of CO and lessons learned

PostBy: Lightning On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 7:43 am

I would say it could be possible but the problem is that, CO (carbon monoxide) detectors don't detect CO2 (carbon dioxide) very well. :)
Lightning
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1537G
Coal Size/Type: Nut/Stove Size Mix

Re: A tale of CO and lessons learned

PostBy: theo On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 7:47 am

Coalkirk, Was that fish caught by you or store bought?
theo
 
Stove/Furnace Make: LL
Stove/Furnace Model: Hyfire 2

Re: A tale of CO and lessons learned

PostBy: coalkirk On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 8:23 am

Lightning wrote:I would say it could be possible but the problem is that, CO (carbon monoxide) detectors don't detect CO2 (carbon dioxide) very well. :)


Thank goodness! It they did it would go off everytime I opened a beer.

theo wrote:Coalkirk, Was that fish caught by you or store bought?


Store. :(
coalkirk
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Harman VF3000
Coal Size/Type: antrhcite/rice coal

Re: A tale of CO and lessons learned

PostBy: theo On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 8:31 am

theo
 
Stove/Furnace Make: LL
Stove/Furnace Model: Hyfire 2

Re: A tale of CO and lessons learned

PostBy: Freddy On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 9:47 am

Ya learn something every day! The co2 story was wrong! It IS CO they use to keep meat from turning brown. Ewwwwww I guess it's time to look closer at the dates on meat.
Freddy
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 130 (pea)
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Reading piece o' junk in the barn (rice)
Coal Size/Type: Pea size, Superior, deep mined

Re: A tale of CO and lessons learned

PostBy: Ctyankee On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 10:39 am

"When the stuff hit the fan here Tuesday evening and I determined there was a real CO event, I went into immediate shut down and ventilation mode. No real diagnostics or observations made. I guess I went tactical instead of scientific. In doing so I lost maybe some valuable information. I've never had the CO detectors in my home go off other than the first day I fired the boiler and had no restrictor plate on the combustion fan. "

I fully agree with the tactical mode response. I was told something in SCUBA class long ago... "If you think you are in a situation where you "might" need to drop your weight belt to get to the surface, you should have already dropped it!"

When life is in danger it seems to me there is no time for science, just go into tactical life-saving mode. You shouldn't think and analyze but just do the emergency routine that you planned out beforehand.

Everyone in my family knows that if the alarm goes off, first thing is to open the doors and get everyone outside (count heads, including visiting guests of your teenagers), and if anyone feels at all sick or groggy call 911. After we have confirmed everything is safe, then we will try to figure out why and what has happen.
Ctyankee
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 503 insert
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea

Re: A tale of CO and lessons learned

PostBy: Horace On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 8:44 pm

coalkirk wrote:Now I will confess I'm a smoke and CO detector freak.


You say that as if it's a character flaw. It's not. When we first bought our house and fired up the coal stove, with the former owner showing me how to do it, he neglected to mention that the flyash hadn't been cleaned out since the beginning of the previous season. Two months later and we were flooded with CO one morning. NO DETECTORS. Luckily (if there is such a thing) it happened in the morning and our alarms went off for work. I got my wife and dogs out of the house, then went back in to see if I could see what was up. At that point, I had no idea what was going on. I'm in the basement, right in front of the stove, which is still belching CO all over the place, when the firemen show up in full gear. They drag me out. I climb into the ambulance with my seven-months-pregnant wife. They drag me out to my own ambulance. The last thing that I heard her say was, "The baby hasn't kicked all morning."

I don't care what you've ever faced, you were never as scared as I was at that moment.

As it all turned out, baby was fine, mom was fine, dad was a wreck, but healthy. Until I peed all over myself in the ER trying to piddle in a plastic bedpan. Twenty-four hours in the hospital sucking pure oxygen, but all's well that ends well, I suppose. The fireman told me that they got CO readings outside of the garage. Next to the stove, it was off the chart.

There's no such thing as too many CO or smoke detectors.
Horace
 
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman ST8-VF8 / Frankenstove

Re: A tale of CO and lessons learned

PostBy: Wood'nCoal On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 10:26 pm

Very good post, Terry.
Thanks for sharing the story.
Wood'nCoal
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert