Slowly but surely getting ready to switch from wood to coal

Re: Slowly but surely getting ready to switch from wood to coal

PostBy: Pancho On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 7:09 pm

Photog200 wrote:I have one of the antique baseburner stoves that has been restored. The base burners are extremely efficient, they were manufactured in the coal burning hey - day. Mine has a suspended fire pot and the exhaust is pulled down around the fire pot keeping it hot. That causes a more efficient burn of the coal because it is keeping the fire pot hot. Then the gases are pulled down under the ash pan and around a chamber in the base (thus, baseburner) then the gases go out the exhaust. When it goes out the chimney, the temps are quite low because they were efficiently distributed throughout the stove. It is my opinion that these old stoves are just as efficient as the new stoves of today. Don't take this the wrong way, I am not knocking the new stoves in any way. I just like the classic designs of the old stoves and I am extremely happy with mine.
Randy


Thanks Randy. This is encouraging. Do they have a hopper on them??. Are they fairly easy to operate once you get it going?.

My wife works at home so she would be the one tending to it (if required) during the day. She can run the wood stove with no issues.
Pancho
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood No. 8
Coal Size/Type: Stove
Other Heating: Jotul Firelight

Re: Slowly but surely getting ready to switch from wood to coal

PostBy: wsherrick On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 7:15 pm

A base heater that is properly restored is many times more efficient than any new stove. There are several companies that sell restored stoves full time. There is a great demand for them.
A large stove such as a Glenwood No 8 base heater or equivalent would be able to heat your house quite easily for about 1/2 of the coal consumption of a new box stove. Oak stoves with an indirect back pipe would also be a good choice for you. There is simply no comparison between those masterpieces to what is made now. Of course, the choice is yours, however; do your homework before you decide.
Here on this forum is the most information you can find in one place anywhere. I mean anywhere.
wsherrick
 
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size

Re: Slowly but surely getting ready to switch from wood to coal

PostBy: Pancho On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 7:22 pm

wsherrick wrote:A base heater that is properly restored is many times more efficient than any new stove. There are several companies that sell restored stoves full time. There is a great demand for them.
A large stove such as a Glenwood No 8 base heater or equivalent would be able to heat your house quite easily for about 1/2 of the coal consumption of a new box stove. Oak stoves with an indirect back pipe would also be a good choice for you. There is simply no comparison between those masterpieces to what is made now. Of course, the choice is yours, however; do your homework before you decide.
Here on this forum is the most information you can find in one place anywhere. I mean anywhere.


If that's the case.....why doesn't everyone go that route?.

I am on Bryant Stove's site...and I gotta say one of those old stoves would look incredible in my house.
Pancho
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood No. 8
Coal Size/Type: Stove
Other Heating: Jotul Firelight

Visit Hitzer Stoves

Re: Slowly but surely getting ready to switch from wood to coal

PostBy: windyhill4.2 On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 7:36 pm

Lots of peopl;e assume that anything old is worn out,too old to be feasible for our modern way of thinking (new is so much better because we are so much smarter today & we know how to make things better )today's labor rates would have the modern version of the base heater thru the roof. Any one know if the chubby would be adequate for this job ??
windyhill4.2
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1960 EFM520 installed in truck box
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404 with variable blower
Coal Size/Type: 404-nut, 520 rice ,anthracite for both

Re: Slowly but surely getting ready to switch from wood to coal

PostBy: Carbon12 On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 8:12 pm

You could always build a small add on utility alcove and hide a modern stoker stove in there with a powerventer. No chimney required. Just duct the supply and return to the alcove. Keep the wood stove for backup and ambiance.
Carbon12
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite
Other Heating: Heat Pump/Forced Hot Air Oil Furnace

Re: Slowly but surely getting ready to switch from wood to coal

PostBy: SWPaDon On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 8:52 pm

wsherrick wrote:A base heater that is properly restored is many times more efficient than any new stove. There are several companies that sell restored stoves full time. There is a great demand for them.
A large stove such as a Glenwood No 8 base heater or equivalent would be able to heat your house quite easily for about 1/2 of the coal consumption of a new box stove. Oak stoves with an indirect back pipe would also be a good choice for you. There is simply no comparison between those masterpieces to what is made now. Of course, the choice is yours, however; do your homework before you decide.
Here on this forum is the most information you can find in one place anywhere. I mean anywhere.

Is this the type of Oak stove you were meaning for Pancho?

http://youngstown.craigslist.org/fuo/4275726324.html
SWPaDon
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1600M
Coal Size/Type: Bituminous. Labeled as 'Big Vein', about the size of acorns. Makes a lot of ash, but heats well and lasts longer than my previous coal.

Re: Slowly but surely getting ready to switch from wood to coal

PostBy: grumpy On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 8:56 pm

Oh Man, that poor stove.... :shock:
grumpy
 

Re: Slowly but surely getting ready to switch from wood to coal

PostBy: SWPaDon On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 9:03 pm

grumpy wrote:Oh Man, that poor stove.... :shock:

Here's one with the legs:

http://york.craigslist.org/atq/4296706445.html
SWPaDon
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1600M
Coal Size/Type: Bituminous. Labeled as 'Big Vein', about the size of acorns. Makes a lot of ash, but heats well and lasts longer than my previous coal.

Re: Slowly but surely getting ready to switch from wood to coal

PostBy: SWPaDon On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 9:07 pm

SWPaDon
 
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1600M
Coal Size/Type: Bituminous. Labeled as 'Big Vein', about the size of acorns. Makes a lot of ash, but heats well and lasts longer than my previous coal.

Re: Slowly but surely getting ready to switch from wood to coal

PostBy: Pancho On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 9:09 pm

SWPaDon wrote:
grumpy wrote:Oh Man, that poor stove.... :shock:

Here's one with the legs:

http://york.craigslist.org/atq/4296706445.html


That's a beauty. What's the heat output on something like that???.

I am open to anything that will give the heat I need (plus a lil' extra).

How do you load a stove like that?.
Pancho
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood No. 8
Coal Size/Type: Stove
Other Heating: Jotul Firelight

Re: Slowly but surely getting ready to switch from wood to coal

PostBy: Carbon12 On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 9:14 pm

You need to throw a bucket of coal in twice a day or so depending on the weather. Fueling and removing ash is often done twice a day. Takes 10-15 minutes to do. Really not a big deal. Most of the antique stoves do not have a hopper but that shouldn't be a deal breaker.
Carbon12
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite
Other Heating: Heat Pump/Forced Hot Air Oil Furnace

Re: Slowly but surely getting ready to switch from wood to coal

PostBy: Pancho On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 9:15 pm

I am looking at a Glenwood #6 or #8 on a stove restoration site. THAT is one purdy stove.
Pancho
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood No. 8
Coal Size/Type: Stove
Other Heating: Jotul Firelight

Re: Slowly but surely getting ready to switch from wood to coal

PostBy: tikigeorge On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 9:18 pm

Do you heat with hot air or water. Check out Keystoker. I have a KA -6 boiler. No electronics, just motors and timers. I use buckwheat coal.
tikigeorge
 
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: KA-6

Re: Slowly but surely getting ready to switch from wood to coal

PostBy: grumpy On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 9:19 pm

Glenwood or Florence top choice, but I don't think Florence made base burners, but don't out rule bit coal either.
grumpy
 

Re: Slowly but surely getting ready to switch from wood to coal

PostBy: Pancho On: Sat Feb 01, 2014 9:23 pm

tikigeorge wrote:Do you heat with hot air or water. Check out Keystoker. I have a KA -6 boiler. No electronics, just motors and timers. I use buckwheat coal.


Free standing wood stove. That's it.

When I say 'no electronics', I really would like to stay away from the need for electricity, period. I cannot tell you how many times we have lost power and I am sittin' toasty warm while some YardBarn friends are without heat.
Pancho
 
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood No. 8
Coal Size/Type: Stove
Other Heating: Jotul Firelight

Visit Hitzer Stoves